American Educational Monthly

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Schermerhorn, Bancroft & Company, 1864
 

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Página 51 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which, being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Página 33 - No matter how poor I am ; no matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling, if the sacred writers will enter and take up their abode under my roof, if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of Paradise, and...
Página 102 - An Act to incorporate the Society instituted in the city of New York, for the establishment of a free school for the education of poor children who do not belong to, or are not provided for by, any religious society.
Página 78 - State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively precribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the...
Página 164 - The day is done, and the darkness Falls from the wings of Night, As a feather is wafted downward From an Eagle in his flight. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me, That my soul cannot resist; A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist...
Página 46 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No ! Men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued, In forest, brake or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain, — These constitute a State ; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, • O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Página 190 - Wasoga and Waganda fishermen coming out in boats and taking post on all the rocks with rod and hook, hippopotami and crocodiles lying sleepily on the water, the ferry at work above the falls, and cattle driven down to drink at the margin of the lake, — made, in all, with the pretty nature of the country — small hills, grassytopped, with trees in the folds, and gardens on the lower slopes — as interesting a picture as one could wish to see.
Página 100 - All hail, great master! grave sir, hail ! I come To answer thy best pleasure ; be't to fly, To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride On the curl'd clouds ; to thy strong bidding, task Ariel, and all his quality.
Página 46 - What Constitutes a State? WHAT constitutes a State ? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate — Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned — Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride — Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Página 121 - In parts superior what advantage lies ? Tell (for you can) what is it to be wise ? 'Tis but to know how little can be known, To see all others...

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