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Rule for the measure. ment of empty vessels.

ART. IX. In countries that have not adopted the Moorsom system of Rules for the measure measuring spaces within vessels, the cubical contents of any of the spaces spaces. included in gross tonnage shall be ascertained according to the Moorsom system as set forth in the following rules: Rule I for the measurement of empty vessels; Rule II for laden vessels; Rule III for open vessels.

RULE I.-- For measuring the gross tonnage of empty vessels.
SECTION 1. The length for the admeasurement of ships having one or
more decks is taken on the tonnage deck, which is-

(a) The upper deck for vessels having one or two decks.
(6) The second deck from below for vessels having more than two decks.

Measure the length of the ship in a straight line along the upper side of the tonnage deck from the inside of the inner plank (average thickness) at the side of the stem to the inside of the midship stern timber or plank there, as the case may be (average thickness), deducting from this length what is due to the rake of the bow in the thickness of the deck and what is due to the rake of the stern timber in the thickness of the deck, and also what is due to the rake of the stern timber in one-third of the round of the beam; divide the length so taken into the number of equal parts required by the following table, according to the class in such table to which the ship belongs:

Class 1: Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, 50 feet long or under, into 4 equal parts.

Class 2: Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 50 feet long and not exceeding 120 feet, into 6 equal parts.

Class 3: Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 120 feet long and not exceeding 180 feet, into 8 equal parts.

Class 4: Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 180 feet long and not exceeding 225 feet, into 10 equal parts.

Class 5: Ships of which the tonnage deck is, according to the above measurement, above 225 feet long, into 12 equal parts.

In the case of a break or breaks in a double-bottom for water ballast, the length of the vessel is to be taken in parts according to the number of breaks, and each part divided into a number of equal parts according to the class in the above table to which such length belongs.

SEC. 2. Then the hold being first sufficiently cleared to admit of the required depths and breadths being properly taken, find the transverse area of the ship at each point of division of the length or each point of division of the parts of the length, as the case may require, as follows: Measure the depth at each point of division, from a point at a distance of one-third of the round of the beam below the tonnage deck, or, in case of a break, below a line stretched in continuation thereof, to the upper side of the floor timber (upper side of the inner plating of the double bottom) at the inside of the limber strake, after deducting the average thickness of the ceiling which is between the bilge planks and the limber strake, subject, however, to the provisions of these rules, Article IV, section 4, regarding the measurement or exemption of doublebottom spaces. In the case of a ship constructed with a double-bottom for water ballast if the space between the inner and outer plating thereof is not available for the carriage of cargo, stores, feed-water, coal, or other fuel, then the depth shall be taken to be the upper side of the inner plating of the doublebottom, and that upper side shall, for the purposes of measurement, be deemed to represent the floor timber of the vessel. This rule for measuring the depth of the hold applies to double-bottom ships having top of double bottom not horizontal.

1 A greater number of divisions is permissible provided there be an even number of divisions. 61861°-13-16

If the depth at the midship division of the length does not exceed 16 feet, divide each depth into 5 equal parts; then measure the inside horizontal breadth at each of the four points of division, and also at the upper point of the depth, extending each measurement to the average thickness in that part of the ceiling which is between the points of measurement. Number these breadths from above (i. e., numbering the upper breadth 1, and so on down to the fifth breadth); multiply the second and fourth by 4, and the third by 2; add these products together, and to the sum add the first breadth and the fifth. Multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the product shall be deemed the transverse area of the upper part of the section; then find the area between the fifth and lower point of the depth by dividing the depth between such points into four equal parts, and measure the horizontal breadths at the three points of division and also at the upper and lower points, and proceed as before, and

two parts shall be deemed to be the transverse area; but if the midship depth exceed 16 feet, divide each depth into 7 equal parts instead of 5, and measure, as before directed, the horizontal breadths at the six points of division, and also at the upper point of the depth; number them from above, as before; multiply the second, fourth, and sixth by 4, and the third and fifth by 2; add these products together, and to the sum add the first breadth and the seventh. Multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the products shall be deemed the transverse area of the upper part of the section; then find the lower part of the area as before directed, and add the two parts together, and the sum shall be deemed to be the transverse area.

This section applies to vessels with double bottoms, the tops of which have a rise from the middle line to each side. In vessels in which the top of the double bottom is horizontal, or in which there is no double bottom, the depths are to be divided by 4 or 6 (instead of 5 or 7), according as their midship depths do not or do exceed 16 feet respectively. In such cases no subdivision of the lower part is to be made.

SEC. 3. Number the transverse sections or areas respectively 1, 2, 3, etc., No. 1 being at the extreme limit of the length at the bow, or of each part of the length, and the last number at the extreme limit of the length at the stern or the extreme limit at the after end of each part of the length; then, whether the length be divided according to the table into 4 or 12 parts, as in classes 1 and 5, or any intermediate number, as in classes 2, 3, and 4, multiply the second and every even-numbered area by 4, and the third and every odd-numbered area (except the first and last) by 2; add these products together, and to the sum add the first and last, if they yield anything; multiply the quantity thus obtained by one-third of the common interval between the areas, and the product will be the cubical contents of the space, or cubical contents of each part if the ship is measured in parts under the tonnage deck. The tonnage of this volume is obtained by dividing it by 100, if the measurements are taken in English feet, and by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in meters. The multiplier 0.353 may be used instead of the divisor 2.83.

SEC. 4. If the ship has a third deck the tonnage of the space between it and the tonnage deck shall be ascertained as follows: Measure in feet the inside length of the space at the middle of its height from the plank at the side of the stem to the lining on the timbers at the stern, and divide the length into the same number of equal parts into which the length of the tonnage deck is divided, as above directed; measure (also at the middle of its height) the inside breadth of the space at each of the points of division, also the breadth at the stem and the breadth at the stern; number them successively 1, 2, 3, etc., commencing at the stem; multiply the second and all the other even-numbered breadths by 4, and the third and all the other odd-numbered breadths (except the first and last) by 2; to the sum of these products add the first and last breadths; multiply the whole sum by one-third of the common interval between the breadths, and the result will give in superficial feet the mean horizontal area of the space; measure the mean height of the space, and multiply by it the mean horizontal area, and the product will be the cubical contents of the space; divide this product by 100 (or by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in meters) and the quotient shall be deemed to be the tonnage of the space, and shall be added to the tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesaid; and if the ship has more than three decks, the tonnage of each space between decks above the tonnage deck shall be severally ascertained in the manner above described, and shall be added to the tonnage of the ship ascertained as aforesaid.

Sec. 5. If there be a break, a poop, or any other permanently covered or closed-in space on or above the upper deck (as defined above in Article III) the tonnage of such space shall be ascertained as follows: Measure the internal mean length of the space in feet, and divide it into two equal parts; measure at the middle of its height three inside breadths, namely, one at each end and the other at the middle of the length; then to the sum of the end breadths add four times the middle breadth, and multiply the whole sum by one-third of the common interval between the breadths; the product will give the mean horizontal area of the space; then measure the mean height and multiply by it the mean horizontal area; divide the product by 100 (or by 2.83 if the measurements are taken in meters) and the quotient shall be deemed to be the tonnage

of the space.

Sec. 6. In measuring the length, breadth, and height of the general volume of the ship or that of the other spaces, reduce to the mean thickness the parts of the ceiling which exceed the mean thickness. When the ceiling is absent, or when it is not permanently fixed, the length and breadth shall be reckoned from the main frames of the ship, not from the web or belt frames. The same principle is to hold in the case of deck erections, that is, the breadth is to be reckoned from the main framing or stiffeners of the same, when ceiling is not fitted. When the main framing of the ship is curved or carried upward and inboard so as to permit the building of topside tanks or compartments outboard of the main framing, the breadth of the ship shall be reckoned from the outboard framing of such outboard tanks, thus including these tanks in the measurement.

RULE II.— For measuring the gross tonnage of laden ships.

Rule for the measure. ment of laden vessels.

SEC. 7. When ships have cargo on board, or when for any other reason their tonnage can not be ascertained by means of Rule I, proceed in the following manner:

Measure the length on the uppermost full-length deck from the outside of the outer plank at the stem to the aft side of the sternpost, deducting therefrom the distance between the aft side of the sternpost and the rabbet of the sternpost at the point where the counterplank crosses it. Measure also the greatest breadth of the ship to the outside of the outer planking or wales at the middle perpendicular. Then, having first marked on the outside of the ship on both sides thereof the height of the uppermost full-length deck at the ship's sides, girt the ship at the middle perpendicular in a direction perpendicular to the keel from the height so marked on the outside of the ship, on the one side, to the height so marked on the other side, by passing a chain under

the keel; to half the girth thus taken add half the main breadth; square the sum, , multiply the result by the length of the ship taken as aforesaid, then multiply this product by the factor 0.17 in the case of ships built of wood, and by the factor 0.18 in the case of ships built of iron or steel. The product will give approximately the cubical contents of the ship, and the tonnage can be ascertained by dividing by 100 or by 2.83, according as the measurements are taken in English feet or in meters.

Sec. 8. If there be a break, a poop, or other permanently covered and closedin spaces (as defined above in Article III) on or above the uppermost fulllength deck, the tonnage of such spaces shall be ascertained by multiplying together the mean inside length, breadth, and depth of such spaces and dividing the product by 100, or 2.83, according as the measurements are taken in English feet or meters, and the quotient so obtained shall be deemed to be the tonnage of the spaces, and shall be added to the other tonnage in order to determine the gross tonnage or total capacity of the ship.

RULE III.- For measurement of open vessels. Sec. 9. In ascertaining the tonnage of open ships, the upper edge of the upper strake of the shell plating is to form the boundary line of measurement, and the depths shall be taken from an athwartship line, extended from upper edge to upper edge of the said strake at each division of the length.

Rule for the measurement of open vessels.

DEDUCTIONS FROM THE GROSS TONNAGE TO ASCERTAIN THE NET TONNAGE.

(A) DEDUCTIONS FOR VESSELS NOT PROPELLED BY ENGINES.

Art. X. The following spaces (enumerated below in secs. 1 to 10 of this article) shall be deducted from the gross tonnage in order to ascertain the net tonnage of vessels not propelled by engines, and no other spaces shall be deducted. Unless otherwise expressly stipulated, these spaces shall be deducted whether located above or below the upper deck.

The volume or cubical contents of deducted spaces shall be ascertained in the manner specified in Article VIII or Article IX of these rules. The remainder, resulting from deducting from the total space included in gross tonnage the sum of the cubical contents of the spaces whose deduction from gross tonnage is permitted by these rules, shall be the net or register tonnage of vessels not propelled by engines and unrigged craft upon which tolls and other charges based upon tonnage shall be paid by vessels of commerce, Army and Navy transports, colliers, supply ships, and hospital ships (as defined in Art. I) for passage through the Panama Canal. One hundred cubic feet, or 2.83 cubic meters, shall constitute one gross or net ton.

Spaces for the use, or possible use, of passengers (as defined in Art. VI) shall not be deducted from the gross tonnage, except in so far as their deduction may be specifically provided for in the following sections (1 to 10) of this article of these rules.

Spaces available for the stowage of stores (other than boatswain's stores) or ports, colliers, supply cargo shall not be deducted from gross tonnage. In case of Army and Navy ships and hospital transports, colliers, supply ships, and hospital ships, as defined in Article I,

the term "stores (other than boatswain's stores) or cargo" shall include, in addition to goods or cargo ordinarily carried as freight on vessels of commerce, the following articles:

On transports, food, stores, luggage, accouterments, and equipment for passengers.

On colliers, coal, coaling gear, and fuel oil not for the use of the colliers.

Definition of stores and cargo carried on

Deductions from gross

not propelled by en

On supply ships, stores, supplies of all kinds, distilling machinery and distilled water (other than feed water stored in double-bottom compartments), machines, tools and material for repair work, mines and mining material, torpedoes, arms, and ammunition.

On hospital ships, food stores for pasengers, medical stores, and hospital equipment.

Guns mounted on transports and supply ships, for defense of the ships, and ammunition required for use in such guns shall not be classed as cargo.

SECTION 1. The tonnage of the spaces or compartments occupied by, or tonnage allowed vessels appropriated to the use of, the officers and crew of the vessel shall be deducted. gines. The term “officers and crew" shall include the personnel inscribed on the ship's rolls, i. e., the ship's officers, engineers, doctors, apothecary, sick attendants, sailors, apprentices, firemen, mechanics, and wireless operators; but shall not include clerks, pursers, stewards, and other members of the personnel provided by the ship for the care of the passengers. The spaces or compartments occupied by the officers and crew shall include their berthing accommodations, spaces provided for medical attention, mess rooms, ward and dressing rooms, bath and wash rooms, water-closets, latrines, lavatories, or privies for their exclusive use, and passageways exclusively serving these spaces.

Sec. 2. On hospital ships the spaces or compartments occupied by doctors, apothecary, and sick attendants duly inscribed on the ship's rolls, shall form part of the deduction under section 1 of this article. Spaces provided for the medical attention of the officers and crew of a hospital ship shall likewise be deducted; but spaces fitted for the transportation, or for the medical attention, of other persons than those duly listed in the ship's rolls shall not be deducted.

SEC. 3. The space occupied by the master's cabin shall be deducted.

Sec. 4. Cook houses, galleys, bakeries, laundries, and rooms for ice machines, when used exclusively to serve the officers and crew, and the condenser space,

and distilling rooms, when used exclusively for condensing and distilling the water for the officers and crew, shall be deducted.

Sec. 5. Spaces used for the anchor gear, steering gear, and capstan; the wheel house, the dynamo rooms; the chart room used exclusively for keeping charts, signals, and other instruments of navigation; lookout houses; spaces for keeping electric searchlights and wireless telegraph appliances; and other spaces actually used in the navigation of the ship, shall be deducted. Such spaces upon vessels of commerce as may be devoted to the mounting of guns and to the stowage of ammunition for the guns thus mounted shall be deducted. The deduction of all spaces, other than those devoted to the mounting of guns, enumerated in this section must be reasonable in extent and be subject to the limitations stipulated below in Article XI.

Sec. 6. In case of a ship propelled wholly by sails, any space, not exceeding 24 per cent of the gross tonnage, used exclusively for storage of sails shall be deducted.

Sec. 7. Spaces used exclusively for boatswain's stores shall be deducted. The deduction is not, however, to exceed 1 per cent of the gross tonnage in ships of 1,000 tons gross and upwards, nor more than 75 tons in any ship however large. In vessels from 500 to 1,000 tons gross the limit is fixed at 10 tons and in vessels from 150 to 500 tons at not more than 2 per cent of the gross tonnage. In vessels under 150 tons at not more than 3 tons.

Sec. 8. The space occupied by donkey engine and boiler shall be deducted if the donkey engine and boiler are connected with the main pumps of the ship, or if they are located in a permanently covered or closed-in structure on or above the upper deck.

SEC. 9. Passages and passageways shall be deducted if they serve deducted spaces exclusively for the officers and crew.

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