Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

1

I have thought proper to add in this place the subjoined table of statistics published by the licensed measurer of grain for this port. It is probably for that entered for consumption, as it differs materially from the custom-house statistics ; at any rate, it is probably the more correct of the two.

TABLE No. 5. Statement showing the amounts of salt, corn, and wheat entered for consump

tion in Madeira during the year 1862.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small]

III. The comparative increase or decrease in articles of import and export. has already been shown in gross; but it may be noted that the imports there has been an increase in beer, coal, earthenware, flour, (slight,) hardware, wine, woollens and linens, and a decrease in cotton, corn, sugar, timber and lumber, tobacco, wheat and coffee. In exports the principal increase has been of beef, brandy, coal, oranges and sugar, the export of the latter being 302,176 pounds against 3,464 pounds in 1861.

Before leaving this topic it will be interesting to note the comparative proportions of the direct and indirect maritime trade of Madeira, as exhibited in the nationality, tonnage, &c., of the vessels touching here during the past year. This will be found in the annexed.

H. Ex. Doc. 41-17

Statement showing the number, nationality, tonnage, and crews of vessels entered and cleared at the port of Funchal during the year 1862, together with the value of their cargoes and the proportion of each engaged in the direct trade to and from the respective countries.

ENTERED.

8 4,447 52 | 14,516

898 106 888

18 | 13,992

1 360 64 26, 391 3

750

20
1,977

47

1,648

126 2,865

79 23, 837

4 981 104 | 39,012

2 739

97

25,984
9

4,837
116 40, 907

3 968
1 73
2

409
1 80
2 720

18

5
12
1
1
1

968

2, 147 $300, 240 00
3,856

34,406 00
1,895 471, 600 00
229
73

960 00
192

47

73

5

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1

2 1 2

409

80 720

5 22 15 49

217 80

15 49

2

720

[blocks in formation]

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

DIRECT TRADE.

INDIRECT TRADE.

Nationality,

Value of cargoes-in

voice.

No. of Tonnage. No. No. of Tonnage. vessels.

of crews. vessels.

No. No. of Tonnage. of crews.vessels.

No. No. of Tonnage. No. of Tonnage. of crews. vessels.

vessels.

79 | 11,992

Portuguese
United States.
British..
Spanish.
Ninteb
French..
Hamburg
Brazilian.

Total in 1862.

140 31,028

1,897

91 | 42, 920

2,880

Total in 1861

123 26,541

1,910

84 30, 429

2, 142

Total in 1862.

45 | 10,040

[blocks in formation]

IV. General regulations of trade, 8c.- Under this head there is little to note in this district. The temporary abatement of duty on our produce, which quickened our trade with Lisbon and Oporto somewhat during the year, had no effect here, as the Juty was abated only at the internal ports, while the islands, unless receiving by transhipments from the continent, obtained no benefit whatever from the regulation. One consequence of this is a greater apparent than real decline here in importations of breadstuffs from the United States.

The existing tariff in this country is, however, so capricious and unequal in its effects as to hamper trade very materially, while bearing unequally upon the people. Another hindrance to our trade, more apparent from the limited markets, are concentrations of the trade in breadstuffs, or combinations almost equivalent in effect to monopolies, crushing out all independent or transient trade, and keeping the market in complete control of a few, to the sore cost of the consuming public. An efficient corrective of this would seem to be the establishment of a reliable commission sale warehouse; but, under present business prospects, there is little inducement to hope that it can be or will be done.

V. Freights.-Since the neutral pirates have entered upon their career there has been almost a total absence of American shipping from these waters. In direct trade to and from Madeira there is little or nothing to be depended upon; but our ships might sometimes find freight from Welsh coal ports to Madeira, and proceed thence home, or to the West Indies, in ballast of paving stones.

VI. Salt and tobacco are still prohibited to be imported except from Portugal, the latter being a monopoly, and the former a protected product.

The consumption of staple products of the United States seems to be on the decrease. That portion of the governor's reference to cereals, already quoted, explains why there has been such a falling off. The consumption of cotton goods shows also a decrease; but as nearly all the cottons used here are of English manufacture, the loss in market is theirs. Were there any means of direct communication with our ports, there can be no doubt that many of the articles now exclusively obtained in England could be more advantageously furnished by the United States.

Since my last report I am glad to notice that the use of our petroleum oil has been introduced here, and has already become quite extensive in this city, where it is rapidly displacing other oils for illuminating purposes. Hitherto olive oil had been most generally in use. As yet, however, there has been but one direct importation of oil and lamps, nearly all that is used being reimported from Portugal or England.

During the year ending December 31, 1862, the value of the cargoes imported into Madeira in American vessels, as reported to me, was $74,489, and the exports $10,685. The same by custom-house returns was: imports, $34,406; exports, $10,685; the difference in imports being due to certain arbitrary values placed on the latter on articles imported.

SANTIAGO, CAPE VERDE-W. H. MORSE, Consul.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1863. I have the honor to report everything quiet and nothing of any unusual importance transpiring within my consular district.

American trade is dull, and in fact so small as hardly to warrant a return of “ Navigation and Commerce."

The importation of Indian corn is prohibited by law, otherwise it could be made an article of profitable trade to us, and beneficial to these islands. At the present time the market price is $2 50 per bushel.

American vessels bound to the coast of Africa continue to touch at these islands, bartering pine lumber, manufactured and leaf tobacco, wooden chairs and flour for goatskins and salt, but in small quantities.

The present time is the season of the annual rains, but without the usual and necessary abundance. It seems to foreshadow a great scarcity of food during the coming year.

*

*

OPORTO—Henry W. DIMAN, Consul.

OCTOBER 1, 1863. * * * I beg further to state to the department that no American vessel has entered or sailed from this port during the past quarter ended September 30, 1863.

[ocr errors]

Statement showing the description and value of the exports from Oporto to the
United States during the quarter ended December 31, 1862.

(Compiled from official copy of invoices.)

Ports.

Merchandise.

Value, including costs and charges.

$705 96

33 93 11,514 07

Boston, via Liverpool .. 130 boxes corks....
Philadelphia ..do... 1 case and 5 bags corks
New York....do 9,732 bundles and 100 quintals of cork-

wood; 46 bags and 21 cases of corks;
6 casks of almonds; 75 casks of ar-
gols; 14 hhds., 40 4-casks, 5 fourth,
and 28 eighth casks of wine.

$12, 253 96

Statement showing the imports and exports at the island of Fayal during the

quarter ended December 31, 1862.

IMPORTS.

Whence imported.

Nature of imports.

Value in reis.

United States Lamber, nails, provisions, &c., &c.....
Newfoundland. Codfish....
Great Britain. Coal, iron, sugar, rice, goods, &c.
Brazil....

Rum, timber.....
Lisbon and islands .. Salt, limestone, tobacco, furniture, oil,

drugs, dried fruits.

6,892, 960 3, 678, 840 31,684, 200

2, 468, 000 27, 37, 640

[ocr errors]

72, 111, 640

EXPORTS.

Whither exported.

Nature of exports.

Value in reis.

United States ....

Straw hats and baskets...
Great Britain.... Fruits, sperm oil, baskets, &c. ...
Lisbon and islands .. Butter, hides, cheese, baskets, salt beef,

specie, sumach, &c.

810, 950 23, 380,000 14, 768, 490

38, 959, 440

Statement showing the imports and exports at the island of Fayal during the

quarter ended March 31, 1863.

IMPORTS.

Whence imported.

Nature of imports.

Value in reis.

28, 364, 000

45, 469, 700

Great Britain..... Coal, goods, sugar, tea, specie, and sun

dries.
Lisbon, St. Michael's, Goods, tobacco, paper, sweet oil, bran-

Terceira, Gracioza, dy, grain, wine, hides, iron work, fur-
Saint Jorge, and niture, and sundries.

Flores.
United States Lumber, canvas, ropes, salt beef, pork,

glass, furniture, &c. St. Domingo .

Coffee.

4,995,000

3,000,000

81, 828, 700

EXPORTS.

Whither exported.

Nature of exports.

Value in reis.

2, 478, 800 40, 550,000

Great Britain..... Fruit, old metal, bones, &c .....
Lisbon, St. Michael's, Butter, old metal, coffee, hides, codfish,

Terceira, Madeira, straw hats, wine, specie, and sun-
Gracioza, St.Jorge, dries.

and Flores.
United States . Fruit, sperm oil, straw hats, braid and

baskets.

14, 693, 540

57, 722, 340

« AnteriorContinuar »