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to secure the earth, stone, and timber from public lands and forest reserves which may be required in the construction of the works.

In order to set this matter at rest and clearly grant and define the rights and privileges in this regard which are necessary to the successful carrying out of the national irrigation act, the legislation in question is proposed.

There is appended hereto and made a part of this report a letter of the Secretary of the Interior stating that, in his opinion," some such legislation would be highly advantageous, if not absolutely necessary, to the successful prosecution of work under the act of June 17, 1902, commonly known as the reclamation act, and in my opinion the bill in question ought to be enacted."

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, April 11, 1904. SIR: I have examined H..R. 14710, a bill authorizing the use of earth, stone, and timber on the public lands and forest reserves of the United States in the construction of works under the national irrigation law, submitted with your letter of the 4th instant with request for an expression of my opinion relative thereto.

Some such legislation would be highly advantageous, if not absolutely necessary, o a successful prosecution of work under the act of June 17, 1902, commonly known as the reclamation act, and in my opinion the bill in question ought to be enacted. Inclosed is a copy of a report of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, stating that he sees no objection to the bill becoming a law. Very respectfully,

E. A. HITCHCOCK, Secretary. Hon. F. W. MONDELL,

Chairman Committee on Irrigation of Arid Lands, House of Representatives.

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Mr. Clay, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 6761.]

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 6761) making an appropriation and providing for the construction of a United States revenue cutter for service in the barbor of San Francisco, State of California, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass without amendment.

The bill has the approval of the Treasury Department, as will appear by the following letter:

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, January 24, 1905. Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 23d, submitting S. 6761 and asking the opinion of this Department with reference thereto.

A revenue cutter on the coast is much needed, and I recommend a favorable report on the bill. Respectfully,

L. M. Shaw. CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE,

United States Senate.

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SENATE.

58TH CONGRESS,

3d Session.

REPORT No. 3335.

LIGHT AND FOG-SIGNAL STATION NEAR POINT

CABRILLO, CAL.

JANUARY 26, 1905.—Ordered to be printed.

Mr. GALLINGER, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the

following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 6648.]

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. 6648) to establish a light and fog-signal station near Point Cabrillo, Cal., having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

The bill has the approval of the Commerce and Labor Department, as will appear by the following letter:

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,

Washington, January 21, 1905. SIR: This Department has the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter dated January 17, 1905, from your committee inclosing a copy of Senate bill 6648, "To establish a light and fog-signal station near Point Cabrillo, California," on which suggestions are asked touching the merits of the bill and the propriety of its passage.

In reply this Department begs leave to state that the Light-House Board, to whom the matter was referred, reports that a light-house near Point Cabrillo would be of great assistance to navigation between Point Arena light-house and Cape Mendocino light-house, California, a distance of 115 miles, which is without a light or fog signal for that entire distance. The large vessels which traverse the coast usually keep well out, using Point Arena and Cape Mendocino or Punta Gordo as points of departure, but the smaller craft that transport the commerce of the small landings along the coast to the northward of San Francisco, which has now assumed quite large proportions, must feel their way as best they can close along inshore. During northerly and easterly weather it is to the advantage of all vessels going up the coast to keep well in under the lee of the land. For the benefit particularly of these a light and fog signal here is desirable.

The establishment of this light and fog-signal station, for the erection of which many petitions have been received, would enable vessels bound for Mendocino City to lie off the shore and hold on to the light or fog signal, instead of running the risk of entering that harbor at night or in foggy weather. After a careful examination of various sites, that at Point Cabrillo is considered the most advantageous.

The Light-House Board at its session on October 3, 1904, recommended the establishment of a light and fog-signal station at or near Point Cabrillo, California. This Department, concurring with the Board, recommends the passage of this bill. Respectfully,

V. H. METCALF, Secretary. The CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE,

United States Senate.

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SENATE.

58TH CONGRESS,

3d Session.

REPORT 1 No. 3341.

USE OF CERTAIN PROPERTY DURING INAUGURATION

PERIOD.

JANUARY 27, 1905.-Ordered to be printed.

Mr. GALLINGER, from the Committee on the District of Columbia,

submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. R. 96.]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the resolution (S. R. 96) authorizing temporary use of certain vacant houses in square 686 in Washington City, and for other purposes, beg leave to report as follows:

The letters bereto annexed from Gen. John M. Wilson, chairman of the inaugural committee, and Hon. William H. Taft, Secretary of War, are self-explanatory, showing that under existing law the use of the corridors of public buildings can not be allowed, as heretofore, for temporary quarters for the National Guard of the several States and Territories. This renders it necessary to secure other quarters, and as there will be certain vacant houses in square 686 belonging to the United States, it is proposed that authority shall be given for their occupancy from the 4th to the 6th day of March next.

Your committee are of opinion that no possible objection can be urged to the joint resolution, and recommend its passage when amended as follows:

In line 12, after the word “of,” strike out the word “such” and substitute the word " said;" and after the word “superintendent,” in the same line, add of the Capitol building and grounds."

Also amend the title so as to read: "Joint resolution authorizing temporary use of certain vacant houses in square 686 in the city of Washington, and for other purposes.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., January 13, 1905. Mr. SECRETARY: From communications already received at this office it is quite evident that a number of States of the Union will be represented in the inaugural parade on March 4 by brigades, regiments, and companies of infantry or troops of cavalry of their National Guard, for which it will be necessary to provide temporary quarters for from twenty-four to forty-eight hours.

It is probable that all the troops of the Regular Army from other localities can be quartered at Washington Barracks and Fort Myer, so that no embarrassment will arise so far as they are concerned.

During the inaugurals of the past twelve years it has been the custom to quarter the State troops in the corridors of public buildings, such as the State, War, and Navy building, Interior Department building, old Post-Office Department building, and city hall, and, so far as I am aware, such action in no way interfered with public business but simply demanded the washing out of those corridors and of the sanitary closets after the troops had left.

The act of Congress approved April 28, 1902, provides as follows:

“That hereafter po public building nor the approaches thereto other than the Capitol building and the White House, in the District of Columbia, shall be used or occupied in any manner whatever in connection with ceremonies attending the inauguration of President of the United States or other public function, except as may be expressly authorized by law."

Quite a thorough canvass has been made of the city, and up to this time, it has proved to be impossible to secure quarters for more than one-fourth of the State troops that will probably arrive, and even in these cases the expense to the troops will be heavy:

It will not do to place these men, who are unaccustomed to the hardships of military life, in tents, and I now write to ask whether in your judgment and that of the Secretary of State and Secretary of the Navy, the law of April 28, 1902, will prevent the use of the corridors of the State, War, and Navy Departments for temporary quarters from the afternoon of March 3 until the evening of March 5, inclusive, and, if not, whether such use can be authorized.

The question has only recently arisen, as it was assumed that the act of April 28, 1902, was only meant to prohibit the use of public buildings for functions such as the inaugural reception, which will take place on the evening of March 4, 1905. Very respectfully,

John M. WILSON,
Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Retired,

Chairman Inaugural Committee. Hon. WILLIAM H. TAFT,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, January 16, 1905. MY DEAR GENERAL: I have your communication of January 13, in which you ask me whether in my opinion the law of April 28, 1902, will prevent the use of the corridors of the State, War, and Navy Department for temporary quarters from the afternoon of March 3 until the evening of March 5 inclusive, and, if not, whether such use can be authorized.

In reply I beg to say that in my judgment the law of April 28, 1902, absolutely prevents the use of the corridors of the State, War, and Navy Department for the pur

I am authorized by the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Navy to say that they concur in the views above expressed. Very sincerely, yours,

WM. H. Tart, Secretary of War. Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, U. S. Army (retired),

Chairman Inaugural Committee, Washington, D. C.

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