The Life of George Washington,: Commander in Chief of the American Forces, During the War which Established the Independence of His Country, and First President of the United States, Volumen3

Portada
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

I
1
II
64
III
127
IV
171
V
224
VI
308
VII
387
VIII
438
IX
484
X
534

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 14 - major M'Williams, that general Conway had written thus to you, " heaven has been determined to save your country or a weak general and bad counsellors* would have ruined it." Lord Stirling, from motives of friendship, transmitted the account with this remark. " The enclosed was communicated by *»»»»»»*»* to major
Página 12 - deep and deadly sin. My lords, I am old and weak, and at present unable to say more, but my feelings and indignation were too strong to have said less. I could not have slept this night in my bed, nor reposed my head upon my pillow, without giving this vent to my eternal abhorrence of such enormous and preposterous principles.
Página ii - engraving, and etching historical and other prints." D. CALDWELL, Clerk of the District of Pennsylvania. CONTENTS. CHAPTER I. Arnold defeated on the lakes....General Carleton appears before Ticonderoga....Retires into winter quarters in Canada....Indian affairs....Treatment of prisoners.... Maritime exertions of America....Paper
Página 11 - Lord Suffolk, secretary of state, contended for the employment of Indians, in the war. " Besides its policy and necessity," his lordship said, "that the measure was also allowable on principle, for that it was perfectly justifiable to use all the means that God and nature had put into our hands." This moving the indignation of lord Chatham, he
Página 311 - Unless thoroughly done away it will be a stain on the national character. It is not the least of our national misfortunes that the strength and character of our army are thus impaired. Familiarized to the horrid scenes of savage cruelty, it can no longer boast of the noble and generous principles which dignify a soldier. -No longer
Página 484 - have an opportunity of justifying himself to the army, to America, and to the world in general, or of convincing them that he had been guilty of disobedience of orders, and misbehaviour before the enemy. On the same day, on Lee's expressing a wish for a speedy investigation of his conduct, and for a
Página 14 - Williams; such wicked duplicity of conduct I shall always think it my duty to detect." In consequence of this information, and without having any thing more in view, than merely to show that gentleman that I was not unapprized of his intriguing disposition, I wrote him a letter in these words.
Página 310 - scalping knife of the savage ? to call into civilized alliance the wild and inhuman inhabitants of the woods? to delegate to the merciless Indian the defence of disputed rights, and to wage the horrors of his barbarous war
Página 400 - North America, except only such duties as it may be expedient to impose for the purposes of commerce, the net produce of which should always be paid and applied to and for the use of the colonies in which the same shall be respectively levied, in like manner as other duties collected under the authority of their respective legislatures are ordinarily paid and applied.
Página 259 - past, worn a dark and gloomy aspect, I yet look forward to a fortunate and happy change. I trust general Burgoyne's army will meet sooner or later an effectual check; and, as I suggested before, that the success he has had will precipitate his ruin. From your accounts

Información bibliográfica