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ST. LUKE'S GOSPEL:

TUE

TEXT DIVIDED INTO PARAGRAPHS,

AND

ARRANGED CHRONOLOGICALLY,

WITH NOTES.

BY

J. DAVIES,

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON,
Author of Notes on Genesis," “ Notes on Exodus,"

and "Notes on Mark.

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LONDON:
GEORGE PHILIP & SON, 32, FLEET STREET
LIVERPOOL: CAXTON BUILDINGS, SOUTH JOHN STREET, AND
49 & 51, SOUTH CASTLE STREET

1870.

101. g. 401*

NOTES ON ST. LUKE'S GOSPEL.

LIFE OF ST. LUKE.

He was not an Apostle; nor is he mentioned either in his own or in the other three Gospels.

He wrote, besides this book, the Acts of the Apostles, which is a sequel to it, showing the progress of the Gospel after the Resurrection until the second Imprisonment of Paul,

That he is the author of the Acts appears from the fact that it, like Luke, is dedicated to Theophilus, and that in its preface he speaks of his “former treatise."

This being so, we infer from his using the pronoun 'We' in some parts of Acts, where he narrates Paul's journeyings, that he was a companion of that apostle. Of this we have confirmation in the fact that

1. Paul thrice mentions a Luke as his companion. The passages are these*Luke, the beloved physician, and Demas greet

you.”—Coloss. “Marcus, Aristarchus, Demas, Lucas, my fellow

labourers.Phile. (These passages were written during Paul's first Imprisonment).

“ Only Luke is with me.”—2 Tim. (This was written during Paul's second Imprisonment).

2. The testimony of the Fathers, especially Eusebius. If this Luke, the companion of Paul, was the author of St. Luke's Gospel and the Acts, he must have been, according to one of the passages quoted above, a physician. That the author of these books was of that profession is pretty clear, from the fact that he describes diseases as only a physician could,-e.g.

In Luke,—The Woman having the Issue of Blood.

In Acts, -Publius's father at Melita. We may, then, rest assured that the St. Luke who wrote the Gospel bearing his name is identical with the Luke mentioned by Paul, and was his companion. Putting together the materials we derive from Scripture and Tradition, we may construct the following connected narrative of his career :

ST. LUKE was of Gentile parentage,born at An

tioch,brought up' as a physician, converted to
Judaism, and then to Christianity, (perhaps by

Paul).
He joined Paul at Troas, on the latter's Second

Apostolic Journey,—was left by Paul at Philippi,-
taken thence by him on his Third Journey, -ac-
companied the Apostle to Jerusalem,—was with
him during his imprisonment at Cæsarea, - ac-
companied him to Rome,—and was with him during

his first and second imprisonments in that city. He is said to have been hanged on an olive tree in his eighty-fourth year.

(N.B.—The points not derived from Scripture are in Italics).

THE GOSPEL.

TIME AND PLACE OF WRITING. He probably collected his materials while travelling with Paul, and wrote his Gospel while he was with the Apostle in his two years' captivity at Cæsarea, (A.D. 56–58); but did not publish it till at least A.D. 63 or 64.

OBJECT. Primarily, to instruct Theophilus; but also with a view to showing the Gentile nations that the Gospel was for all mankind, and not for the Jews alone.

That it was meant specially for Gentiles appears from the following facts :

1. He explains Jewish words and customs.
2. He traces Christ's genealogy up to Adam.
3. He narrates many facts and parables, (e.g.--The

Good Samaritan, and the Prodigal Son), which
reprobate Jewish exclusiveness, and teach that

salvation is free for all. SOURCES OF HIS INFORMATION.

1. “The oral narrative common to all the Apostles.”

Of this there were, (to judge from Luke's preface), many versions, and he, (aided by the Holy Spirit),

carefully sifted them, and traced out the truth. 2. The guidance of Paul. Of this we have proof from(1). The agreement of his Gospel with the

doctrines taught by the Apostle. (His account of the Institution of the Eucharist

is almost the same as Paul's.)

(2). The testimony of the Fathers. 3. Probable intercourse with the mother and family

of Christ. Hence his intimate knowledge of our

Lord's early life.
CHIEF CHARACTERISTICS.

1. Universality.
2. The abundance of records of words and deeds of

love and mercy.
3. Agreement with St. Paul's doctrines.
4. Purity of his Greek, and polish of style.

MATTERS PECULIAR TO THIS GOSPEL.
Miracles. Raising the Widow's Son at Nain.

Restoring the Deformed Woman.
Healing the Man with the Dropsy.
Healing the Ten Lepers.

Healing Malchus's Ear.
L'arables. The Good Samaritan.

The Rich Fool.
The Barren Fig Tree interceded for.
The Two Debtors.
The Lost Sheep.
The Lost Piece of Silver.
The Prodigal Son.

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