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NO BETTER ARGUMENT WAS EVER MADE FAVORING MUNICIPAL ART

Each person

It would include a system of docks at the our city governed better we must realize that the mouth of the Chicago River of such size and de- present and the future governing majority lives tail as to permit the rapid loading and unloading in the crowded districts under conditions where of the largest marine freighters and their con normal growth is impossible, and if that physical nection with the railroads through subways. It growth is impossible we cannot expect wisdom would include similar docks at South Chicago, and ethics from our governors. The remedy is to where the steel, coal, lumber and manufacturing let in the sunlight. interests are bound to grow.

This plan would also include such recreation

piers as would restore the lake front to the active PURIFY THE RIVERS.

bath-craving youth. It would include boulevards It would include the transformation of our on the south shore east of the Illinois Central rivers into clean streams, lined with clean and tracks, connecting Grant Park and Jackson Park. attractive factories, industrial centers, or beauti It would also include reclaiming the Hyde Park ful residences. It would include the substitution reef, which stands now as a menace to all kinds of bascule bridges or permanent ones for all of of boating. It would put upon it the spoil from the present draw bridges.

our drainage canal, and turn it into an island For the better maintenance of cleanliness and park of inestimable value. beauty, it would transmit by electricity the power now being wasted in the drainage canal so that

SUBJECT FOR STUDY. boilers and smoke might be eliminated from the These and many other things would be infactory district.

cluded in the plan, which should receive the There is no reason why Chicago River should active thought and devoted work of all our not be as attractive as the Seine, and there is also citizens for a period of years. It is all general, no reason why Chicago should not even at this and it is legitimate to ask if it is really practical late date have the advantages of plans which are or whether or not it is all a dream. so great and so evident in the case of Paris. The niust answer that question for himself. Let him beautiful plan upon which all of the streets and study the history of such movements in other boulevards are there laid out contributes much cities or of all great movements, and he may be more than the architectural façades to the beauty trusted to conclude that all great things have of Paris. Indeed, it quite nullifies the bad effect small beginnings, and that they start with a wellof some of the poor architecture there.

defined conceptiou and a determination to realize

it. This determination is quite indifferent to NEW PARK SYSTEM.

obstacles, and is willing to depend upon the The plan would further include a park sys natural value of its ideas to carry the scheme tem, extended to embrace the natural park of the through. Des Plaines Valley, lying west of the city and It is encouraging to us when we are appalled extending north and south thirteen or fourteen by the immensity of the problem before us 10 miles. It would include the Wildwood district, think of one small thing which has been done the Calumet River and Stony Island. It would here in Chicago. The idea that we needed small include much of the natural park land at Blue parks and play-grounds existed three years ago, Island. It would include the Skokie marshes, so far as all practical results are concerned, in the which form the present source of the north mind of one man. By the aid of a committee of branch of the river, and the extension and five from an organization of only twenty members branching of Sheridan drive. It would include he conceived a plan, the object of which was to a radical and definite study of our lake-front obtain small parks and play-grounds in the problem, making use of the land lying east of crowded districts. Illinois Central tracts out to the recent breakwater. It would include the proper disposition

STRIKING RESULTS. of such buildings as should be put in the park at The result was a set of resolutions, which the north and south ends, such as the Art In were afterward adopted by the Common Council stitute and its extensions, the Crerar Library of Chicago, calling for the appointment of a the Permanent Exposition Building, the Field special park commission, which has now been at Museum and possibly the City Hall, leaving work less than two years, and which has already open space in the centre.

opened to the public five play-grounds, which has Our plan would also include small parks and directed the expenditure of $20,000 in money, the playgrounds in the crowded districts where our turning over to play-ground purposes of land bedensest population lives and where the governing longing to the city worth $70,000 or $80,000, and element of our city resides. If we would have the obtaining rent free of two other valuable tracts.

90

THE ARCHITECTURAL ANNUAL

And that is not all. From this small begin- much more is now being done of which the public ning has resulted the passing of four bills by the will soon know. Illinois Legislature which gave our regularly con- It therefore seems wise and opportune to stituted park authorities the power to expend extend such planning to embrace our entire city $2,500,000 in the furtherance of this work. And and reasonable to hope for satisfactory results.

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THE ELECTRICAL TOWER AT THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION

JOHN GAYLEN HOWARD, ARCHITECT

THE BEAUTIFYING OF CITIES

CHARLES H. CAFFIN IN “THE WORLD'S WORK”

A

LARGE number of people, the majority veniences and comforts or the lack of them upon in fact, have no consciousness of the de. which they barp. The dignity or beauty of Paris,

sirability of beauty in a city. With them while it cannot have escaped their notice at the the highest consideration is the convenience or time, has not been brought home in their hearts comfort of the city life; and in these respects such as a thing that it would be desirable to emuenormous improvements have been made within late in New York. Yet, if they had learned recent years that the city seems to represent from the foreigner any wrinkle that would imeverything that could be desired. 'What is this prove their own business they would be quick to beauty, anyway?” they exclaim. Perhaps they adopt it. were in Paris during the Exposition, when the Yet may not this same beauty be just such a omnibus system proved itself entirely inadequate wrinkle? I think it is worth to the Parisians to accommodate the crowds who wished to be about $200,000,000 a year. Paris caters for the carried. They come home and rail against the world, and its main store in trade is its beauty, miseries of it and extol the superiority of their which it keeps on increasing, and the treasures of own system of rapid transit, though the latter is its works of art. Poor impoverished Italy, where not without its drawbacks. Then they did not would she be to-day were it not for the beauty of have a decent steak all the time they were in her cities, much of it created four and five hunParis, and the oysters—but the foreigners don't dred years ago, on which now she is gathering a know what oysters are ! Every time it is the con- dividend of $90,000,000 annually?

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GRAND PRIX DESIGN, 1899-ÉCOLE DES BEAUX ARTS

BY TONY GARNIER

The subject of the competition was to design new headquarters in Paris for the Bank of France, including official residences for the leading bank officials, etc.

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GRAND PRIX DESIGN, 1899

BY TONEY GARNIER

A commanding site being given, the designer has produced a most interesting plan for a new bank of France. The approaches are in perfect scale and the front, back and sides define themselves instantly. The greatest skill is shown in the subdivisions; the main court, it will be noticed, does not communicate with the courts giving access to the official residences, and the side and back entrances are merely service driveways. The treasury is in the very heart of the building, surrounded by a colossal banking-room,

ATTUR

HE

and the outer portion of the structure is given over to private offices, counting-rooms, etc. One of the ininor details is the individual stalls for three hundred bicyles for bank-runners. The composition is a unit, yet the plan includes two isolated stables, two isolated freight-houses, and two semi-isolated private palaces, each in the most convenient spots from which to perform their respective functions. All the rooms are shown furnished, and every desk, chair and gaslight is indicated with precision.

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