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we readily adopt them into the scale of Nature, from
a presumption, that were they really to exist, they
would probably resemble the characters which his
wand has endowed them with.

These two plays are generally supposed to have
been the first and second of his writing; though I
believe there are no dates remaining, to confirm this
opinion ; which can therefore be founded only on the
idea, that his youthful imagination must naturally be
thought to have been more sportive and exuberant,
than his riper judgment might have permitted the
indulgence of. And here, indeed,

“ She wantons, as in her prime,

“ And plays at will her virgin fancies :"
though, if I may be allowed the liberty of a criti-
cism about this matter, I should be rather inclined
to suppose this Play to have been one of his latter
performances, as all the unities are so strictly pre-
ferved in it.

But though both these pieces possess all the lefser
merits of poely, they are not so much suited to the pur-
pose of my present undertaking, especially the second,
as several others of the same author ; for the most
material events, in both, being principally conducted
by machinery, or supernatural agency, produce rather
astonishment than reflection : fo that unless we adopt
Dr. Johnson's remark, in the first scene of the Tem-
pest," it may be observed of Gonzalo, that being the

only good' man that appears with the King, he is ... the only one who preserves his chearfulness in the

wreck, or his hope on the island," there is not so much to be collected from them, as I could wish, ta be placed to the score of Morality. However, all that can be extracted from either, referrible to this head, shall be diligently pointed out to the reader. With this view I shall lay the Fable of this Play before my reader, for the sake of the Moral, which may be fo fairly deduced from it.

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Prospero,

readily adopt them into the scale of Nature, from resumption, that were they really to exist, they ild probably resemble the characters which his Ed has endowed them with. hese two plays are generally supposed to have n the first and second of his writing; though I ieve there are no dates remaining, to confirm this nion ; which can therefore be'founded only on the

, that his youthful imagination must naturally be ught to have been more sportive and exuberant, n his riper judgment might have permitted the

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ulgence of. And here, indeed,

“ She wantons, as in her prime,

“ And plays at will her virgin fancies :" ough, if I may be allowed the liberty of a critin about this matter, I should be rather inclined suppose this Play to have been one of his latter formances, as all the unities are fo ftrictly preved in it. But though both these pieces possess all the lefer rits of poely, they are not so much suited to the purle of my present undertaking, especially the second, several others of the same author ; for the matt terial events, in both, being principally conducied

Prospero, a duke of Milan, having been expelled his dominion, by the usurpation of his brother. Anthonio, confederated with Alonzo, a king of Naples, is committed to the mercy of the winds and waves, in a rotten bark, accompanied only by his daughter, Miranda, a child of three years old, but has had the good fortune to escape, and be landed on an uninhabited inand; where the first scene is laid, and the intire action continued, during the whole representation.

About twelve years after this event, Anthonio, with Alonzo, Ferdinand his son, and other attendants, being on a voyage together, are driven out of their course, by a storm, and wrecked upon this island, but escape alive on shore ; where the Prince, meeting with Miranda, falls in love with her, and a reciprocal passion is conceived on her part, also.

Prospero, having thus got his enemies within his power, on their repentance, generously forgives them their cruelty and injustice, recovers his dukedom again, and the marriage of the lovers confirms an alliance on both sides.

From this short story I think the following general Moral will naturally result : That the ways, the justice, and the goodness of Providence, are so frequently manifested towards mankind, even in this life, that it should ever encourage an honest and a guiltless mind to form hopes, in the most forlorn lituacions; and ought also to warn the wicked never to rest assured in the false confidence of wealth or power, against the natural abhorrence of vice, both in God and man. Many of the unforeseen events of life, which

appear to us but accident or contingency, may possibly be parts of the secret workings of Provi

machinery, or fupernatural agency, produce rather
orithment than reflection : fo that unless we adopt

Johnson's remark, in the first scene of the Ten-
1, " it may

be observed of Gonzalo, that being the only good man that appears with the King, ke is the only one who preferves his chearfulneis in the wreck, or his hope on the island," there is not so ich to be collected from them, as I could will, 10 placed to the score of Morality. However, all toza i be extracted from either, referrible to this head,

dence,

“ All chance direction which we cannot see;" and have oftener been remarked rather as chastife. ments of vice, than as reliefs from misery. We are B 2

sen Gible

1l be diligently pointed out to the reader. 13

view l hall lay the Fable of this Play before in der, for the lake of the Moral, which may be á

Prosper.

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rly deduced from it.

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we readily adopt them into the scale of Nature, from a presumption, that were they really to exist, they would probably resemble the characters which his wand has endowed them with.

These two plays are generally supposed to have been the first and second of his writing; though I believe there are no dates remaining, to confirm this opinion ; which can therefore be founded only on the idea, that his youthful imagination must naturally be thought to have been more sportive and exuberant, than his riper judgment might have permitted the indulgence of. And here, indeed,

“ She wantons, as in her prime,

And plays at will her virgin fancies :" though, if I may be allowed the liberty of a criticism about this matter, I should be rather inclined to suppose this Play to have been one of his latter performances, as all the unities are so strictly preferved in it.

But though both these pieces possess all the lesser merits of poefy, they are not so much suited to the purpose of my present undertaking, especially the second, as several others of the same author ; for the most material events, in both, being principally conducted by machinery, or supernatural agency, produce rather altonishment than reflection : fo that unless we adopt Dr. Johnson's remark, in the first scene of the Tempest, “ it may be observed of Gonzalo, that being the

only good man that appears with the King, he is -60 the only one who preserves his chearfulness in the " wreck, or his hope on the island,” there is not so much to be collected from them, as I could wish, to be placed to the score of Morality. However, all that can be extracted from either, referrible to this head, shall be diligently pointed out to the reader. With this view I shall lay the Fable of this Play before my reader, for the sake of the Moral, which may be fo fairly deduced from it.

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Prospero,

Prospero, a duke of Milan, having been expelled his dominion, by the usurpation of his brother. Anthonio, confederated with Alonzo, a king of Naples, is committed to the mercy of the winds and waves, in a rotten bark, accompanied only by his daughter, Miranda, a child of three years old, but has had the good fortune to escape, and be landed on an uninhabited island; where the first scene is laid, and the intire action continued, during the whole representation.

About twelve years after this event, Anthonio, with Alonzo, Ferdinand his son, and other attendants, being on a voyage together, are driven out of their course, by a storm, and wrecked upon this island, but escape alive on shore; where the Prince, meeting with Miranda, falls in love with her, and a reciprocal passion is conceived on her part, also.

Prospero, having thus got his enemies within his power, on their repentance, generously forgives them their cruelty, and injustice, recovers his dukedom again, and the marriage of the lovers confirms an alliance on both sides.

From this short story I think the following general Moral will naturally result : That the ways, the justice, and the goodness of Providence,' are so frequently manifested towards mankind, even in this life,' that it should ever encourage an honest and a guiltless mind to form hopes, in the most forlorn situations; and ought also to warn the wicked never to rest assured in the false confidence of wealth or power, against the natural abhorrence of vice, both in God and man.

Many of the unforeseen events of life, which appear to us but accident or contingency, may possibly be parts of the secret workings of Provi. dence,

“ All chance direction which we cannot see ;" and have oftener been remarked rather as chastife. ments of vice, than as reliefs from misery. We are

sen Gble

B a

sensible in our own nature, of a stronger impulse to resent the first, than even to commiserate the latter. How much higher, then, must this sentiment rise, in the Author of that very nature! In wretchedness there is no contagion ; 'tis but particular and temporary: the effects of vice are general and eternal.

Part of a speech in this play may be better quoted here, than elsewhere, as it refers so immediately to this subject.

ARIEL, speaking to the Conspirators.
But remember,
For that's my business to you, that you three
From Milan did fupplant good Prospero;
Exposed unto the sea, which hath requit it,
Him and his innocent child ; for which foul deed,
The Powers, delaying, not forgetting, have
Incensed che seas and Mores, yea, all the creatures,
Against your peace, Thee, of thy son, Alonzo,
They have bereft ; and do pronounce, by ine,
Lingering perdition, worse than any death
Can be at once, thall step by step attend
You and your ways; whose wrath to guard you from,
(Which here in this most desolate ile else falls
Upon your heads) is nothing but heart's furrow,
And a clear life enfuing *.

Let us now proceed to the particular maxims and sentiments which occur from the several parts of the Dialogue. · ACT I.

I. . SCENE II. Miranda, speaking of the shipwreck, thus expresses her sympathetic feelings for the wretched.

O! I have suffered
With those that I saw fuffer: A brave veífel,
(Who had, no doubt, some noble creatures in her)
Dah'd all to pieces. O! the cry did knock

Against my very heart. Poor souls, they perish'd !
Had I been any God of power, I would
Have funk the sea within the earth, or ere
It should the good thip fo have swallowed, and
The freighted fouls within her.

AA III, Scene iv.

There

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