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the Erie Canal, the Albany and Buffalo Railroad, the manufactures and productions of this city, and the merchandise sold in this city to the Western trade, constituie the exports.

The States using the Lake route in 1848 for transporting their merchandise and other supplies, were Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, lowa, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, New York bordering on Jake Erie, and Canada West.

(Condensed tables are here given from the statements of the canal office, of the various quantities and valuation of canal imports, for the year 1848, and also, of the different kinds of property, quantities and value, which cleared by the Albany and Buffalo Railroad.

These tables, or similar ones, we have given in a former number. The report thus proceeds :)

From the foregoing statements the value of the Export Commerce (including Foreign, which amount will be given under its proper head) of Buffalo during the year 1848, may with considerable certainty be arrived at.

Property landed here from the Erie canal, originally destined for the Western States

29,486,393 do. do. do. Canada West

46,382 do. for Buffalo and that portion of New York on and near Lake Erie

8,072,345 Received by the Albany and Buffalo Railroad

3,212,832

11,285,177 To determine what amount of this sum of 11,285,177 dollars, enters into the Lake Commerce, the committee think, that by adding to it the value of manufactured articles of iron-mongery, cabinet ware, leather, white lead, upholstery, and the production of numerous other manufactures in this city; a large portion of dry goods of light weight but valuable, broughton by railroad originally started for the Western States; the export of the largest portion of the salt brought up the canal; the large amount of merchandise sold wholesale and retail to the Western traders ;-it will not be exaggerating to place the value at three-fourths of the canal and railroad importation, which will give an amount of

8,463,883 Forming a total of

37,996,658 These statements show that the importations from the Eastward into this city, in 1848, were equal to the sum of $40,817,952; of which amount $37,996.658 entered into and formed the export commerce of this Port that year, to the Western States. The value of the imports from the Lakes so far as they can be arrived at, is $22,143,404, making the total of the Lake Commerce, of imports and exports from this port in 1848, $60,140,062. 4th. Exports, Foreign, quantity and value.

The Commitiee are unable to specify in detail the articles which make up our Foreign export trade, and can only refer to them by name. They consist of merchandise received by the Erie Canal originally destined for Canada, various articles of merchandise purchased in this city, as well as considerable wheat, flour, pork and whiskey used on the public works in Canada, and for the trade of the St. Lawrence. The amount of exports as given at the Custom House is $254,254, as follows:Exports, Foreign goods in American vessels

6,089 Foreign

52,906 Domestic produce in American vessels

51,938 Foreign

143,321

254,254

5th. Number of Steam Boats, Steam Propellers and Vessels Registered and Licensed

in the District of Buffalo, their tonnage and value.

By referring to the Custom House records, we find the following named Boats, Propellers and Vessels, their tonnage and the number of persons employed thereon, registered and licensed in this District in 1848.

(Here follows a table containing the names in full and the tonnage of all the lake vessels, which is thus summed up by the Committee :) forming a total as follows:Class.

Number. Tonnage. Valuation. Steamers

28

16,741.31 $884,000 Propellers

14

4,925.40 206,000 Brigs

32

7,430.75 225,000 Schooners

86

13,531.39 401,300
Sloops and Scows

4
106.54

6,100

Total

164

44,744.49 $1,722,400 To arrive at the value of this property was a most difficult matter. It would not answer to put it down at the original cost, nor yet so low, as to satisfy those owning it that we had placed a value upon it far below its real market as well as intrinsic worth. To obviate these objections, the committee not only appraised the several vessels, but they referred the matter to an experienced ship-carpenter, and to others well conversant with the property. The several parties made separate estimates without consultation with each other, and the amount arrived at, as stated in this report, is the result of the mode adopted. 6th. Number of persons employed.

By reference to the books at the Custom House, we ascertain the number of persons employed on the various vessels licensed and registered in this District in 1848, wereEmployed on Board Steamers

803
Do.
Propellers

275
Do.
Brigs

330
Do.
Schooners

714
Do.
Sloops and Scows

14
Total number employed

2,136 7th. Number of Arrivals and Departures during the season, of Steamers and Ves

sels, and their aggregate tonnage.

From the Custom House books, the number of arrivals and departores reported (which do not include all) and gross amount of tonnage wasFor quarter ending March 31, 1848.

No.

Tons. Hands. Arrivals from Foreign ports, American ves. 728 45,391.27 1,456

Do. do. Foreign Cleared to do. American ves. 728 45,391.27 1,456

Do. do. Foreign ves. Arrivals, coastwise

6

2,185.23 133 Cleared, do.

8

3,329.52 187 For the quarter ending June 30. Arrivals from Foreign ports, American ves. 845

53,301.19 Do.

do. Foreign ves. 263 55,417.79 3,304 Cleared to do. American ves. 866

54,831.41 1.816 Do. do. Foreign ves. 264

53,906.77 3,242 Arrivals, coastwise

1,202 330,540.23

16,175 Cleared, do.

1,235 356,330.35 16,953

1,708

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For the quarter ending September 30.

No..
Tons.

Hands.
Arrivals from Foreign ports, American ves, 740 46,643.19 1,495
Do.
Foreign ves. 239

49,365.79 2,891 Cleared to do. American ves. 758 49,990.41 1,588

Do. do. Foreign ves. 231 47,168.77 2,837 Arrivals, coastwise

1,052 289,223.23 14,153 Cleared, do.

1,081 311,787.35 14,834
For the quarter ending December 31.
Arrivals from Foreign ports, American ves. 837 52,832.70 1,732
Do. do. Foreign ves. 114

30,663.78 1,634
Cleared to
do. American ves.

846 53,631.24 1,782 Do. do. Foreign ves. 116 29,702.13 1,642 Arrivals, coastwise

832

230,559.37 11,135 Cleared, do.

742 208,101.05 10,095 The entrance and clearance of American vessels from and to Foreign ports in this statement appear very large; the reason of it is this—a steam ferryboat runs regularly across the Niagara river from Black Rock, which is included in the other arrivals and departures. To arrive at the number that justly and properly belongs to commerce, the committee exclude all the American arrivals and clearances from and to Foreign ports in the quarter ending March 31, and seven-eighths of the same during the remainder of the season. This, we are informed by the officials at the Custom House, would give a very near account of the number of American vessels engaged in commercial business with Foreign ports.

A statement of the entire number of arrivals and clearances we have given, and making therefrom the deductions above stated, shows that as near as the accounts can be made up, the arrivals and departures were 8084, with an aggregate tonnage of 2,045,175 tons. 8th. The population of the city, January 1, 1849.

Much diversity of opinion exists as to the real number of our population-many judicious persons putting it as high or higher than 45,000. The last official cen.. sus was the State census of 1845, which gave the number 29,837. Estimating from the number of votes polled, and from the number of children at our public schools, which is the only guide we have, the committee prefer placing the number at 40,000, to going beyond it. In 1850, only one year from this time, the United States census will be taken, when the true number will be ascertained. In estimating as we have to do now, the committee prefer erring by putting the number under, than over the real amount,

The answer to the ninth inquiry, viz.: The works of internal improvements constructed for the benefit of commerce, is deferred to a subsequent number.

GROWTH AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKIE. Among the Lake ports which have sprung up as if by magic in the west, none have perhaps had a more rapid growth than Milwaukie, situated upon the Wisconsin shore of Lake Michigan. From the statistics of the place recently collected for the agent of the government, and published, it appears that in May, 1834, Mr. Solomon Juneau was the only white seitler within the limits of what is now the city of Milwaukie. The following table of census returns, iaken since that period, exhibits the rate of increase in the population. 1838,

700 1840,

1,700 1842,

2,700

1816,-June 1,

9,655 1847,- Dec. 15,

14,061 1849,-Aug. (estimated)

18,000 Equally rapid has been the augmentation in the exports of produce, &c. It was in 1845, that the first shipments of wheat and flour, to any extent, were made from Milwaukie. The following table shows how this business grows.

EXPORTS FROM MILWAUKIE.

Wheat bushels. Flour bbls. 1845,

95,510 7,550 1846,

213,448 15,756 1847,

508,011 35,840 1848,

612,574 92,732 1849,

1,148,807 201,942 It is proper to remark that the exports for 1849, in the above table, embrace those from July 1, 1848, 10 July 1, 1849, while those for the four previous years are for the season of navigation in each year respectively,

The value of exports from Milwaukie in 1848 were of manufactured articles $1,714,200, and of agricultural products $2,098,469, making a total of ex. ports of $3,812,669. The value of imports of merchandise, &c., for the same period was $3,828,650. There are in Milwaukie five flouring mills, propelled by water power, and one by steam, containing seventeen run of stone, each ruu capable of turning out 80 to 100 bbls. flour per day, and consuming in all 7000 bushels wheat daily.

There are thirty-nine sail vessels owned in, and sailing out of that port, of which the total tonnage is 5,542; also, stock in steamers and propellers of 3000 10ns; making the total tonnage owned in the port 8,542,

Sixteen sail vessels are engaged exclusively in the lumber trade, and the remainder in freighting produce and merchandise.

ARRIVALS DURING THE SEASON OF 1848.
Steamers,

498
Propellers,

248 Barques and brigs,

119 Schooners,

511

Total,

1,376

MICHIGAN. The growth of this youthful member of the confederacy has been wonderfully rapid. In 1830 her settlement had hardly commenced; now her population is not less than 400,000. Her soil bears every species of grain which thrives in the State of New York. In 1847, she exported over one million of barrels of flour, an amount ten times greater than all the wheat and flour that passed through the Erie canal from west of Buffalo in 1835. Her total tonnage in 1847 was over 35,000, and its value is estimated at $1,757,250. The aggregate commerce for the same year was over thirteen millions. Her fisheries yield $200,000 a year; her wool product is over $400,000. Iron, copper, salt, and plaster, are indigenous and abundant.

COMMERCE OF CINCINNATI. From an interesting article in the Cincinnati Gazette, in reference to the commerce of that flourishing city, we gather the following statistics of some of the principal articles of trade. The commercial year opens on the 1st of September, and closes on the 31st of August.

VOL. II.-SEPT., 1849. 8

IMPORTS.

1846-7.
1847-8.

1848–9. Cotton, bales,

12,528
13,476

9,058 Coffee, bags,

59,337
89,242

74,961 Molasses, barrels,

27,216
51,001

52,591 Rice, tierces,

1,145
2,494

3,365 Sugar, hogsheads,

16,649
27,153

22,685 Do. barrels,

7,196
11,175

7,575 Do. boxes,

5,177
2,928

1,847 Total packages,

129,248

188,469 172,582 EXPORTS.

1846–7.
1847-8.

1848-9. Cotton, bales,

5,077
6,123

4,009 Coffee, bags,

13,037
18,587

18,907 Molasses, barrels,

9,046
18,332

17,750 Sugar, hogsheads,

4,998
5,559

8,443 PORK AND BEEF. The following is a comparative statement of the stock of Pork and Beef exported from Cincinnati, and in the Inspection Warehouse, at New Orleans, on the first of the last three months. PORK.

July 1. August 1. Sept. 1. Clear, barrels,

53
103

151 Prime Mess,

116
57

27 Mess,

22,224 22,187 18,816 Mess, Ordinary,

4,988
5,078

4,500 Soft Mess,

648
132

90 Prime,

6,172
5,093

3,124 Prime Ordinary, Soft Prime,

522
478

502 Rumps and Chines,

2,348
2,721

2,647 Inferior and Damaged,

618
916

567 Not Inspected,

3,252
2,319

1,880 Total, barrels,

40,941
39,084

32,604 BEEF.

July 1.

August 1. Sept. 1. Prime Mess, tierces,

30 Do. barrels,

650

276 Mess, barrels,

1,114
662

346 Mess, Ordinary,

162
196

132 Prime,

462
541

492 B. Beef,

27

59 Inferior and Damaged,

202

219

39 Mess and Prime, half barrels, 1,288

1,203

107 Total,

3,772
3,129

2,323 Total tierces,

30
Total barrels,

2,451
1,926

1,248 Total half barrels,

1,288
1,203

1,075
3,772
3,129

2,323 The stock of Lard, as near as can be ascertained, is 13,500 tierces and bar. rels, and 43,000 kegs. Last year, 2,000 barrels and 3,800 kegs.

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