Bearing Witness Against Sin: The Evangelical Birth of the American Social Movement

Portada
University of Chicago Press, 2006 - 256 páginas

During the 1830s the United States experienced a wave of movements for social change over temperance, the abolition of slavery, anti-vice activism, and a host of other moral reforms. Michael Young argues for the first time in Bearing Witness against Sin that together they represented a distinctive new style of mobilization—one that prefigured contemporary forms of social protest by underscoring the role of national religious structures and cultural schemas.

In this book, Young identifies a new strain of protest that challenged antebellum Americans to take personal responsibility for reforming social problems.In this period activists demanded that social problems like drinking and slaveholding be recognized as national sins unsurpassed in their evil and immorality. This newly awakened consciousness undergirded by a confessional style of protest, seized the American imagination and galvanized thousands of people. Such a phenomenon, Young argues, helps explain the lives of charismatic reformers such as William Lloyd Garrison and the Grimké sisters, among others.

Marshalling lively historical materials, including letters and life histories of reformers, Bearing Witness against Sin is a revelatory account of how religion lay at the heart of social reform.

 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

IV
10
V
39
VI
54
VII
86
VIII
118
IX
154
X
196
XI
207
XII
235
XIII
251
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 1 - God is my witness that, great as is my detestation of slavery and the foreign slave trade, I had rather be a slaveholder — yea, a kidnapper on the African coast — than sell this poison to my fellow-creatures for common consumption. Since the creation of the world there has been no tyrant like INTEMPERANCE, and no slaves so cruelly treated as his."* Abhorring war, he CHAP.VIII.
Página 1 - As I left my native state on account of slavery, and deserted the home of my fathers to escape the sound of the lash and the shrieks of tortured victims, I would gladly bury in oblivion the recollection of those scenes with which I have been familiar; but this may not, cannot be...

Acerca del autor (2006)

Michael P. Young is assistant professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin.

Información bibliográfica