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PREFACE

The purpose of this volume is to supply in convenient form a body of reading material suitable for use in a course of study dealing with the Romantic Movement in English literature. The selections included have been chosen' with a two-fold intention: first, to provide in one book all the material, with the single exception of the novel, necessary to acquaint the student with the best and most characteristic work of the men who made the years 1798 to 1832 one of the notable epochs of English literature; secondly, to add to this body of prose and verse on which critical appreciation has set the seal of final approval, and which not to know is to argue oneself unknown, enough of what preceded and accompanied the triumph of the Romantic temper to show the inception of the Movement, its growth, its contrasts, its failings. Selections from Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry and from Scott's The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border are included because of the recognized influence of both of these collections upon the Romantic Movement; Percy and Scott were the most conspicuous of the group of antiquarians who were consciously concerned with the revival of interest in medieval ballads and romances. It seemed advisable also that the Gothic revival, another important phase of Romanticism, should be given representation, and therefore selections have been included from Walpole's The Castle of Otranto and from Beckford's The History of the Caliph Vathck. With these exceptions, the novelists have been excluded, inasmuch as a novel does not readily lend itself to selection, and had best be studied in its entirety.

It has been the aim to include, whenever possible, literary wholes; but in some cases the desire adequately to illustrate all the Romantic interests of a given writer has made it necessary to include only extracts from the longer works. But as a rule these extracts are distinctly characteristic in themselves as well as self-explanatory; where needed, summaries of omitted portions have been supplied in the notes. In the case of such works as Don Juan and The Prelude, enough is given to make the use of other books practically unnecessary. As it was impossible to give space to all of any one of Scott's longer poems, two cantos of The Lady of the Lake have been included as representative of this side of Scott's work. The complete poem, as well as Marmion, which is represented in the text only by songs, may easily be procured in cheap editions, if it is so desired.

The selections under each author are arranged in the order of writing, so far as this could be determined, except that in the case of writers from whom both poetry and prose are included, the selections of poetry are placed first. Dates of writing and publication, when known, are given at the beginning of each selection; dates of writing are printed in italics. Lines of verse are numbered as in the complete poems; dots are used to indicate editor's omissions ; asterisks are used as the authors used them and usually denote that the selection in which they occur was left incomplete. Unless the original spelling is distinctly important, as it is in the case of Chatterton's poems, modern spelling is employed. In the references to pages in this volume, the letter a is used to indicate the first column on the page; the letter b, to indicate the second column. Brief glossarial notes are given at the foot of the page; additional notes, both explanatory and critical in character, are given in the Appendix, where are also to be found bibliographies and reference lists, selections from the writings of Pope, Johnson, and Burke, a table of important historical events and a list of English, German, and French writers of the period, a glossary of proper names occurring in the text, and an index of authors, titles, first lines of poems, and first lines of lyrics found in the dramas and other long works printed in this volume.

I wish to express my thanks to the Houghton Mifflin Company, to Ginn and Company, to the Macmillan Company, to the John Lane Company, and to E. P. Dutton and Company for the privilege of quoting extracts from their publications; to the Librarian of the Harvard University Library for the use of a number of books which otherwise would have been inaccessible to me; to Professor Arthur W. Craver, of Miami University, and to Professor George Benedict, of Brown University, for suggestions regarding individual writers and selections; to Miss Iva Firkins, of the Library of the University of Minnesota, and to Mr. R. L. Walkley, of the Minneapolis Public Library, for help in preparing the bibliographies; to several of my colleagues and students who have been generous of their time in supplying necessary information or other help; and especially to Professor Lindsay Todd Damon, of Brown University, whose careful supervision and keen critical judgment have made for countless improvements throughout the book.

In a book of this size and nature, it is extremely difficult to preserve complete consistency of treatment, and no doubt inaccuracies have resulted. I shall appreciate notification of any corrections which may occur to students or instructors using the volume.

G. B. W. Carleton College,

September 1, 1916.

CONTENTS

PAGE
I EIGHTEENTH CENTURY FORE- Edward Young (1681-1765)
RUNNERS

Night Thoughts

1943.6

PAGE

From Night I

33

Anne, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-

From Night III

34

1720)

35

From Night V

From Night VI

35

The Tree

1

From Night IX

35

From The Petition for an Absolute Re-

From Conjectures on Original Compo-

treat

1

sition

36

To The Nightingale.

2

A Nocturnal Reverie.

2 Robert Blair (1699-1746)

From The Grave .....

37

Thomas Parnell (1679-1718)

A Fairy Tale

3 William Shenstone (1714-1763)

A Night-Piece on Death.

From The Schoolmistress..

40

A Hymn to Contentment.

Mark Akenside (1721-1770)

Allan Ramsay (1686-1758)

The Pleasures of the Imagination

The Highland Laddie..

7

From Part I

44

My Peggy

7

For a Grotto

46

Sweet William's Ghost.

8

Ode to the Evening Star.

47

Through the Wood, Laddie.

9

An Thou Were My Ain Thing.

9 William Collins (1721-1759)

From The Gentle Shepherd

A Song from Shakespear's Cymbelyne.. 48

Patie and Peggy.

9

Ode to Simplicity.

Preface to The Evergreen.

11

Ode on the Poetical Character.

49

William Hamilton of Bangour (1704-

Ode Written in the Beginning of the

Year 1746

50

1754)

Ode to Evening.

50

The Braes of Yarrow...

13

The Passions ..

51

Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson.

52

David Mallet (1705-1765)

An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of

William and Margaret.

15

the Highlands of Scotland.... 53

The Birks of Endermay.

15

Thomas Gray (1716-1771)

John Dyer (1700-1758)

Ode on the Spring....

57

Grongar Hill

16

Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton Col-

The Fleece

lege

57

From Book I...

17

Hymn to Adversity...

58

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard 59

James Thomson (1700-1748)

The Progress of Poesy.

61

The Seasons

The Bard

63

From Winter

18 Ode on the Pleasure Arising from Vicis-

From Summer

19

situde

65

From Autumn

21 Song (Thyrsis, when we parted, swore)

A Hymn on The Seasons.

23 The Fatal Sisters

66

The Castle of Indolence

The Descent of Odin.

67

From Canto I......

24 The Triumphs of Owen..

68

Tell Me, Thou Soul of Her I Love.. 32 The Death of Hoel...

68

To Amanda

32 Caradoc

68

Preface to Winter..

.1348 Conan

68
72

PAGE

PAGE

Thomas Gray (Continued)

Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770)

From Journal in France..

69 Bristowe Tragedie; or, The Dethe of Syr

From Gray's Letters

Charles Bawdin.

125

To Mrs. Dorothy Gray.

69 The Accounte of W. Canynges Feast. :. 130

To Richard West..

70 From Ælla: A Tragycal Enterlude

To Horace Walpole.

71 Mynstrelles Song (The boddynge flour-

To Richard Stonehewer.

71 ettes bloshes atte the lyghte) ...... 130

To Thomas Wharton...

71

Mynstrelles Song (O! synge untoe mie

To the Reverend William Mason.

72

roundelaie)

131

To the Reverend William Mason,

An Excelente Balade of Charitie.

132

To Thomas Wharton...

. 1244 Epitaph on Robert Canynge.

134

To Horace Walpole.

1263

To Richard Hurd.

.1264 William Beckford (1759-1844)

To Horace Walpole. .

.1265 From The History of the Caliph Vathek 134

From Journal in the Lakes..

73

William Cowper (1731-1800)

Thomas Warton (1728-1790)

From Olney Hymns

From The Pleasures of Melancholy..... 75 Lovest Thou Me?...

145

From Ode on the Approach of Summer 76 Light Shining Out of Darkness. 145

The Crusade....

77 The Task

Sonnets

From Book I. The Sofa

145

Written in a Blank Leaf of Dugdale's

From Book II. The Time-Piece. 147

Monasticon

77

From Book VI. The Winter Walk at

Written at Stonehenge

78

Noon

148

While Summer Suns o 'er the Gay Pros- The Poplar-Field

148

pect Play'd..

78 The Negro's Complaint.

148

On King Arthur's Round Table at On the Receipt of My Mother's Picture

Winchester

78

out of Norfolk..

149

From Observations on the Fairy Queen Yardley Oak.

151

of Spenser

79

To Mary.

153

The Castaway.

154

Joseph Warton (1722-1800)

From Cowper's Letters

To William Unwin

1202

The Enthusiast: or The Lover of Nature 80

To William Unwin

Ode to Fancy..

84

1247

To Mrs. Cowper

1247

From Essay on the Genius and Writings

To Mr. Johnson

of Pope...

85

1248

To William Unwin

.1248

James Macpherson (1738-1796)

George Crabbe (1754-1832)

Carthon: A Poem...

86

From The Village

Oina-Morul: A Poem..

91

Book I

154

From Fingal: An Ancient Epic Poem

From The Borough

Book I....

92

Letter I. General Description.. 160

Richard Hurd (1720-1808)

From Preface to The Borough

1251

From Letters on Chivalry and Romance William Lisle Bowles (1762-1850)

Letter I

97

At Tynemouth Priory.

164

Letter VI

98

The Bells, Ostend..

164

Bereavement

Horace Walpole (1717-1797)

164,

Bamborough Castle.

164

From The Castle of Otranto

Hope

165

Chapter 1...

100

Influence of Time on Grief.

165

From Preface to The Castle of Otranto.1350 Approach of Summer.

165

Absence

165

Thomas Percy (1729-1811)
From Reliques of Ancient English Poetry

WiWam Blake (1757-1827)

Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne. . . . 110

To Spring:

166

The Ancient Ballad of Chevy-Chase.. 112 How Sweet I Roamed.

166

Sir Patrick Spence.

116 My Silks and Fine Array.

166

Edom o' Gordon..

117 To the Muses..

166

Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor.

118 Introduction to Songs of Innocence. 166

The Shepherd....

167

James Beattie (1735-1803)

The Little Black Boy.

167

Retirement

119 Laughing Song

167

The Minstrel; or, The Progress of Genius The Divine Image.

167

From Book I..

120 A Dream..

168

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PAGE

PAGE

William Blake (Continued)

Robert Burns (Continued)

The Book of Thel...

168 Dedication to the Second, or Edinburgh

The Clod and the Pebble.

170

Edition of Burns's Poems..

206

Holy Thursday....

170 Holy Willie's Prayer..

.1212

The Chimney-Sweeper

171

Letter to Thomson.

.1217

Nurse's Song.

171 Letter to Alison..

.1280

The Tiger..

171

Ah, Sunflower.

171 II. NINETEENTH CENTURY ROMANTI-

The Garden of Love..

171

CISTS

A Poison Tree...

171 Samuel Rogers (1763-1855)

A Cradle Song.

172

Auguries of Innocence.

172

The Pleasures of Memory

The Mental Traveller.

173

From Part I..

207

Couplet (Great things are done when men

An Italian Song.

209

and mountains meet).

174

Written at Midnight.

209

From Milton...

174 Written in the Highlands of Scotland... 209

To the Queen.

209

174 An Inscription in the Crimea...

The Boy of Egremond..

210

Robert Burns (1759-1796)

From Italy

The Lake of Geneva.

210

0, Once I Lov'd a Bonie Lass...

175

The Gondola

211

A Prayer in the Prospect of Death. 175

The Fountain

212

Mary Morison...

175

My Nanie, 0..

175 Willam Godwin (1756-1836)

Poor Mailie's Elegy.

176

Enquiry Concerning Political Justice

Green Grow the Rashes, O.

176

From Book I. Of the Powers of Man

To Davie....

177

Considered in His Social Capacity.. 213

Epistle to J. Lapraik.

177

From Book V. Of the Legislative and

Epistle to the Rev. John M 'Math.

179

Executive Power.....

219

The Jolly Beggars.

180

The Holy Fair..

185 William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

The Cotter's Saturday Night.

188 Extract from the Conclusion of a Poem,

To a Mouse.

190

Composed in Anticipation of Leav-

Address to the Deil.

191

ing School....

223

A Bard's Epitaph.

193 Written in Very Early Youth.

223

Address to the Unco Guid; or, The Rig- From An Evening Walk...

223
idly Righteous.

193 Lines Left Upon a Seat in a Yew-Tree. 223

To a Mountain Daisy.

194 The Reverie of Poor Susan...

224

To a Louse...

194 We Are Seven..

225

The Silver Tassie.

195 The Thorn....

225

Of A’ the Airts.

195 Goody Blake and Harry Gill.

228

Auld Lang Syne.

195 Her Eyes Are Wild..

229

Whistle O'er the Lave O't.

196 Simon Lee...

230

My Heart's in the Highlands.

196

Lines Written in Early Spring.

231

John Anderson My Jo....

196 To My Sister..

231

Sweet Afton....

196 A Whirl-Blast from behind the Hill. 232

Willie Brew'd a Peck of Maut.

197 Expostulation and Reply.

232

Tam Glen..

197 The Tables Turned...

232

Thou Lingåring Star.

198 Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tin-

Tam o' Shanter..

198 tern Abbey...

233

Ye Flowery Banks.

201 The Old Cumberland Beggar.

234

Ae Fond Kiss....

201

Nutting

237

The Deil's Awa wi' th’ Exciseman. 201 Strange Fits of Passion Have I Known.. 238

Saw Ye Bonie Lesley.

202 She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways. 238

Highland Mary...

202 I Travelled among Unknown Men..... 238

Last May a Braw Wooer.

202 Three Years She Grew in Sun and Shower 238

Scots, Wha Hae..

203

A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal...

239

A Red, Red Rose.

203 A Poet's Epitaph...

239

My Nanie's Awa.

203

Matthew

239

Contented wi' Little.

204 The Two April Mornings..

240

Lassie wi' the Lint-White Locks.

204 The Fountain.

240

Is There for Honest Poverty.

204 Lucy Gray.

241

O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast. 205 The Prelude

0, Lay Thy Loof in Mine, Lass. 205 From Book I. Introduction-Childhood

Preface to the First, or Kilmarnock Edi-

and School-Time....

242

tion of Burns's Poems..
205 From Book II. School-Time

245

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