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CONTAINING THE TITLES OF ALL WORKS UP TO DECEMBER 1893.

COMPILED BY

HUGH ROBERT MILL, D.Sc.

LONDON:
PUBLISHED FOR THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY BY

JOHN MURRAY,
50 ALBEMARLE STREET, W.

1895.

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PREFACE.

THE first Catalogue of the Library of the Royal Geographical Society

I was prepared by the Secretary, Dr Norton Shaw, in 1852. It was superseded in 1865 by a larger Catalogue, comprising 542 pages octavo, giving the contents of the Library down to that date. This was arranged in one alphabet, according to authors' names, as far as possible, but with subject headings for anonymous books, and extensive sub-divisions under “Voyages," "Transactions,” &c. This Catalogue bears marks of having been rapidly compiled and not very carefully revised. In 1871 an Appendix of 136 pages was prepared by Mr Godfrey M. Evans, of the British Museum, containing the accessions up to the end of 1870. Mr Evans also prepared a Classified Catalogue brought up to 1870. The accessions for the ten years 1870-80 were catalogued by Mr E. C. Rye, at that time Librarian to the Society, and his is an admirable piece of work, the revision having been very thorough. It consists of 380 pages, and necessarily follows the classification of the main Catalogue and its first Supplement, but uniformity was introduced into the cataloguing of compound names, and some improvements were made in the manner of entering official publications.

On my appointment as Librarian in March 1892, it became my duty to prepare a third Supplement to the Catalogue, containing the accessions for the ten years ending in 1890. This was completed, with the aid of Mr Vincent S. B. Hawkins, the Assistant-Librarian, in February 1893. But after estimates had been obtained for printing the third supplement as a volume of 420 pages, the Library Committee decided to incorporate the Catalogue of 1865 and the three appendices, and to print the whole as one volume. The additional material was prepared for the printer, and after several experiments the form now adopted was arrived at as the best and most convenient; the use of double columns being necessary in order that the whole might be contained in a single volume.

The one aim kept in view was to produce a Catalogue of the most convenient form for the use of Fellows of the Society and practical geographers. No attempt was made to give a bibliographical description of the books or a full transcript of the title-pages. Nor are the contents of books, except in the great collections of travels in Appendix I., noted, save in a few cases, and papers in journals are not catalogued. The size of the volumes is

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