Life, Sex and Ideas: The Good Life Without God

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Oxford University Press, 2004 - 236 páginas
"A distinctive voice somewhere between Mark Twain and Michel Montaigne" is how Psychology Today described A.C. Grayling. In Life, Sex, and Ideas: The Good Life Without God, readers have the pleasure of hearing this distinctive voice address some of the most serious topics in philosophy--and in our daily lives--including reflections on guns, anger, conflict, war; monsters, madness, decay; liberty, justice, utopia; suicide, loss, and remembrance.
A civilized society, says Grayling, is one which never ceases having a discussion with itself about what human life should best be. In this book, Grayling adds to this discussion a series of short informal essays about ethics, ideas, and culture. A recurring theme is religion, of which he writes "there is no greater social evil." He argues, for instance, that liberal education is better than religion for inculcating moral values. "Education in literature, history, and appreciation of the arts," he says, "opens the possibility for us to live more reflectively and knowledgeably, especially about the nature and variety of human experience. That in turn increases our capacity for understanding others better, so that we can treat them with respect and sympathy, however different their outlook on life." Thought provoking rather than definitive, these essays don't tell readers what to think, but only note what has been thought about how it is best to live.
A person who does not think about life, the author reminds us, is like a stranger mapless in a foreign land. These brief and suggestive essays offer us the outlines of a map, with avenues of thought that are a pleasure to wander down.
 

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Life, sex and ideas: the good life without God

Crítica de los usuarios  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Grayling (Meditations for the Humanist) writes in praise of the essay, and his book is an excellent example of a fine essayist in action. It consists of a large number of short pieces on various ... Leer comentario completo

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This book was so well written the author is sharp and realistic, although rough to some I found it refreshing and informative,it was unexpected.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Emotion
3
Moral Education
6
Emancipation and Ethics
11
Symbols
16
Religion
20
Credulity
24
Fasting
27
Meat
30
Guns
126
War
129
Waxs Causes
132
Western Victories
135
Triumph
138
Safety
141
War Crimes
144
Vengeance
146

Evil
33
Luxury
36
Games
39
Marriage
42
Sex
45
Benevolence
60
Morality
63
Identity
69
Cultures
72
Conservation
76
Teachers
82
Intellectuals
84
Politics
91
Voting
94
Utopia
97
Profit
101
Power
104
Protest
106
Justice
109
Liberty
112
Pluralism
116
Anger
121
Conflict
124
Capital Punishment
148
Bystanders
151
Slavery
154
Experience
157
Suicide
163
Loss
166
Obsequies
169
Remembrance
172
Naturalness
177
Nature
181
Monsters
184
Madness
187
Clones
193
Decay
196
The Essay
201
Reading and Reviewing
206
Biography
215
Becoming Philosophical
219
Philosophy
228
Reality
231
Values and Knowledge
234
Derechos de autor

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Página iii - I applied mine heart to know, and to search, and to seek out wisdom, and the reason of things...

Acerca del autor (2004)


A.C. Grayling is a British literary journalist and university professor of philosophy, who contributes the weekly column "The Reason of Things" to The London Times and writes frequently for Financial Times and The New York Review of Books. He is a Reader in Philosophy at Birbeck College, University
of London, and Supernumerary Fellow of St. Anne's College, Oxford. His books include Meditations for the Humanist: Ethics for a Secular Age.

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