Cuba Between Empires, 1878-1902

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University of Pittsburgh Press, 2007 - 490 páginas

Cuban independence arrived formally on May 20, 1902, with the raising of the Cuban flag in Havana - a properly orchestrated and orderly inauguration of the new republic.  But something had gone awry.  Republican reality fell far short of the separatist ideal.  In an unusually powerful book that will appeal to the general reader as well as to the specialist, Louis A. Perez, Jr., recounts the story of the critical years when Cuba won its independence from Spain only to fall in the American orbit.

The last quarter of the nineteenth century found Cuba enmeshed in a complicated colonial environment, tied to the declining Spanish empire yet economically dependent on the newly ascendant United States.  Rebellion against Spain had involved two generations of Cubans in major but fruitless wars.  By careful examination of the social and economic changes occurring in Cuba, and of the political content of the separatist movement, the author argues that the successful insurrection of 1895-98 was not simply the last of the New World rebellions against European colonialism.  It was the first of a genre that would become increasingly familiar in the twentieth century: a guerrilla war of national liberation aspiring to the transformation of society.

The third player in the drama was the United States.  For almost a century, the United States had pursuedthe acquistion of Cuba.  Stepping in when Spain was defeated, the Americans occupied Cuba ostensibly to prepare it for independence but instead deliberately created institutions that restored the social hierarchy and guaranteed political and economic dependence.  It was not the last time the U.S. intervention would thwart the Cuban revolutionary impulse.

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Contenido

The Fateful Interlude
3
From Reconciliation to Reconcentration
39
Intuitive Certainty
57
Exhaustion of the Passions
73
An Imperfect Consensus
89
Convergence and Divergence in Cuban Separatism
109
Rebellion of the Loyal
139
The Passing of Spanish Sovereignty
165
Purpose Without Policy
269
Collaboration and Conflict
283
The Electoral Imperative
303
From Amendment to Appendix
315
The Construction of a Colonial Army
329
Sugar Reciprocity and the Reconstruction of the Colonial Economy
345
A General Understanding
367
Postscript to the ColonyPrologue to the Republic
375

Shades of a Shadow
179
The Infelicitous Alliance
195
From Allies to Adversaries
211
Peace Without Victory
229
Dissent and Dissolution
249
Notes
389
Bibliography
449
Index
481
Derechos de autor

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Página 180 - In view of these facts and of these considerations, I ask the Congress to authorize and empower the President to take measures to secure a full and final termination of hostilities between the Government of Spain and the people of Cuba...
Página 323 - That the government of Cuba shall never enter into any treaty or other compact with any foreign power or powers which will impair or tend to impair the independence of Cuba, nor in any manner authorize or permit any foreign power or powers to obtain by colonization or for military or naval purposes or otherwise, lodgment in or control over any portion of said Island.
Página 147 - If it shall hereafter appear to be a duty imposed by our obligations to ourselves, to civilization, and humanity to intervene with force, it shall be without fault on our part and only because the necessity for such action will be so clear as to command the support and approval of the civilized world.
Página 323 - III. That the government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty, and for discharging the obligations with respect to Cuba imposed by the treaty of Paris on the United States, now to be assumed and undertaken by the government of Cuba.
Página 147 - The near future will demonstrate whether the indispensable condition of a righteous peace, just alike to the Cubans and to Spain, as well as equitable to all our interests so intimately involved in the welfare of Cuba, is likely to be attained.
Página 72 - When the inability of Spain to deal successfully with the insurrection has become manifest, and it is demonstrated that her sovereignty is extinct in Cuba for all purposes of its rightful existence, and when a hopeless struggle for its reestablishment has degenerated into a strife which means nothing more than the useless sacrifice of human life and the utter destruction of the very...
Página 313 - November, in the year 1900, to frame and adopt a constitution for the people of Cuba, and, as a part thereof, to provide for and agree with the government of the United States upon the relations to exist between that government and the government of Cuba...
Página 186 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination when that is accomplished to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Página 323 - States to carry these resolutions into effect," the President is hereby authorized to "leave the government and control of the island of Cuba to its people" so soon as a government shall have been established in said island under a constitution which, either as a part thereof or in an ordinance appended thereto, shall define the future relations of the United States with Cuba, substantially as follows...
Página 61 - Other considerations connected with a certain class of our population, make it the interest of the southern section of the Union that no attempt should be mad.e in that island to throw off the yoke of Spanish dependence...

Acerca del autor (2007)

Louis A. Pérez, Jr. is the J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Información bibliográfica