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" which blessed afsurance, I feel that inward joy which this world “ can neither give nor take from me.” More he would have spoken, but his spirits failed him; and, after a short conflict betwixt nature and death, a quiet figh put a period to his last breath, and so he fell asleep".

And here I draw his curtain, till with the most glorious company of the Patriarchs and Apostles, the most noble army of Martyrs and Confessors, this most learned, most humble, holy man, shall also awake to receive an eternal tranquillity, and with it a greater degree of glory than common Christians shall be made partakers of. In the mean time, Bless, O Lord! Lord, bless his brethren, the clergy of this nation, with ardent desires, and effectual endeavours to attain, if not to his great learning, yet to his remarkable meekness, his godly simplicity, and his Christian modera. tion: for these are praise-worthy; these bring peace at the last! And let the labours of his life, bis most excellent writings, be blessed with what he designed when he undertook them: which was glory to thee, O God on high, peace in thy church, and good will to mankind. Amen, Amen. .

d He died Nov, 2, 1600. Thus the day of his death was noted by Archbishop Laud, in the title-page of his copy of “ The Ecclesiastical Polity."

APPENDIX .

TO THE LIFE OF

MR. RICHARD HOOKER,

A ND now having by a long and laborious search fatisfied myself, and I hope, my reader, by imparting to him the true relation of Mr. Hooker's life; I am desirous to acquaint him with some observations that relate to it, and which could not properly fall to be spoken till after his death, of which my reader may expect a brief and true account in the following Appendix.

And first, it is not to be doubted but that he died in the fortyseventh, if not in the forty-sixth year of his age ; which I mention, because many have believed him to be more aged; but I have so examined it, as to be confident, I mistake not; and for the year of his death, Mr. Camden, who in his “ Annals of Queen Elizabeth," 1599, mentions him with a high commendation of his life and learning, declares him to die in the year 1599; and yet in that inscription of his monuments, set up at the

e The following is an accurate copy of the inscription on Mr. Hooker's monument:

SUNT MELIORA MIHI. RICHARDUS HOOKER EXONIENSIS SCHOLARIS SOCIUSQ; COLLEGIICORP. XTI OXON: DEINDE'LONDINIIS TEMPLI INTERIORIS IN SACRIS MAGISTER RECTORQ; HUJUS ECCLÆ. SCRIPSIT VIII LIBROS POLITIÆ ECCLESIASTICÆ ANGLICANÆ, QUORUM TRES DESIDERANTUR, OBIIT ANO. DOM. MDC ÆTATIS SUÆ L.

ATIS SUÆ L. . . . .üi POSUIT HOC PIISSIMO VIRO MONUMENTUM ANO. DOM, MDCXXXIII, GULIELMUS COWPER ARMIGER IN CHRISTO JESU QUEM GENUIT PER EVANGELIUM, 1 Cor. iv. 15.

Sir William Cowper, who ereded this monument, was the great grandfather of William, the first Earl Cowper, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. He was created first a Baronet of Nova Scotia, and afterward a Baronet of England in 1641. He suffered imprisonment, the loss of his son, and other great calamities, for his fidelity to Charles I. He outlived all his troubles, residing at his cafile of Hertford, and famed for his hofpitality, charity, and other Chrifiian virtues, often visiting his poor neighbours at their houles, and relieving them in private according to their necessities.

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