Imágenes de páginas
PDF
[ocr errors]

d Dr. Donne seems to have entertained an indifference to and an alienation from every fecular pursuit. In the various scenes of his maturer life, he has his attention principally fixed upon another and a better state. His defires and affections being mortified and entirely subdued, he familiarizes to his thoughts the idea of death. Hence he expresses not merely an acquiescence in the difpenfations of God cailing him away from this world, but even an unwillingness to live; and by that very extraordinary mode of representation, which his biographer has recorded, he reconciles and endears to himself the approaching moinent of his dissolution. But such a conduct will not be pursued by the generality of mankind. We are indeed influenced by every religious and moral principle to aspire after length of days and an honourable old age; when we languiih on the bed of fickness, to bear the agonies of pain with the conföling hopes of being reliored to health, not to reject the probable remedies which medicinal skill proposes for extinguishing dileale and protracting life. This difpofition, joined with a cherrlul and ready consignment of our state to the will of God, and a juli fente of the finall value of all eartbly enjoyments, is surely not unworthy of

the Christian character.

[merged small][ocr errors]

colo 1631 I made a tombe for Dr. Donne, and sette it up in St. “ Paul's, London, for which I was paid by Dr. Mountford the fum of £120. I took £60 in plate, in part of payment." (From a Copy of the Pocket-Book of Nicholas Stone. ro 1631, Humphrey Mayor, a “ workman employed under Stone, finitht the tiatue for Dr. Donne's “ monument, 28:0:0.” (Ibid.).

On the south-fide of the Choir of St. Paul's Cathedral, food a white, marble monument, with the figure of Dr. Donne, in his Mroud, standing erec!, his feet in an urn, and placed in a nich. Speed calls it "A White Marble Statle on an Urn." Above are the arms of the Deanery, inpaled with his own, viz. a wolf saliant. The concluding lines of the infcription evidently allude to his pofiure. : “ He was looks oing toward the eali, from whence he expested his Saviour.” The critical reader will remember, that in Zech vi. 12. the passage alluded to, mould be rendered - Behold the Man, whose name is the BRANCH,” which the Seventy-Two translate 'Avatuan óvouv'auty,--and the Vula' gate “ Oriens nomen ejus."

Of

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

and by Dr. Donne's own appointment, these words were to be affixed to it as his epitaph:

JOHANNES DONNE,

SAC. THEOL.. PROFESS.
POST VARIA STUDIA QUIBUS AB ANNIS TENERRIMIS

FIDELITER. NEC INFELICITER INCUBUIT:
INSTINCTU ET IMPULSU SP. SANCTI, MONITU

ET HORTATU
REGIS JACOBI, ORDINES SACROS AMPLEXUS
ANNO SUI JESU, MDCXIV. ET SUÆ ÆTATIS XLII.
DECANATU HUJUS ECCLESIÆ INDUTUS

XXVII NOVEMBRIS, MDCXXI. EXUTUS MORTE ULTIMO DIE MARTI MDCXXXI. HIC LICET IN OCCIDUO CINERE ASPICIT EUM

CUJUS NOMEN EST ORIENS.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »