Joan of Arc: And Minor Poems

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G. Routledge and Company, 1854 - 469 páginas
 

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Página 328 - They say it was a shocking sight After the field was won ; For many thousand bodies here Lay rotting in the sun : But things like that, you know, must be After a famous victory. 'Great praise the Duke of Marlbro* won And our good Prince Eugene;' 'Why 'twas a very wicked thing !' Said little Wilhelmine; 'Nay . . nay . . my little girl,' quoth he, 'It was a famous victory.
Página 327 - IT wAS a summer evening; Old Kaspar's work was done. And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the sun; And by him sported on the green His little grandchild Wilhelmine. She saw her brother Peterkin Roll something large and round. Which he beside the rivulet In playing there had found; He came to ask what he had found. That was so large and smooth and round. Old Kaspar took it from the boy, Who stood expectant by; And then the old man shook his head, And with a natural sigh...
Página 344 - O READER ! hast thou ever stood to see The Holly Tree ? The eye that contemplates it well perceives Its glossy leaves Order'd by an intelligence so wise, As might confound the Atheist's sophistries. Below, a circling fence, its leaves are seen Wrinkled and keen ; No grazing cattle through their prickly round Can reach to wound ; But as they grow where nothing is to fear, Smooth and unarm'd the pointless leaves appear.
Página 327 - And often, when I go to plough, The ploughshare turns them out. For many thousand men," said he, " Were slain in that great victory." "Now tell us what 'twas all about...
Página 328 - twas a famous victory. 'My father lived at Blenheim then, Yon little stream hard by; They burnt his dwelling to the ground, And he was forced to fly: So with his wife and child he fled, Nor had he where to rest his head.
Página 329 - Why .'twas a very wicked thing! " Said little Wilhelmine. ">Nay, nay, my little girl," quoth he, " It was a famous victory. " And everybody praised the Duke, Who such a fight did win." " But what good came of it at last? " Quoth little Peterkin. " Why, that I cannot tell," said he,
Página 344 - And should my youth, as youth is apt I know, Some harshness show, All vain asperities I day by day Would wear away, Till the smooth temper of my age should be Like the high leaves upon the Holly Tree.
Página 264 - The shriek again was heard : it came More deep, more piercing loud ; That instant o'er the flood the moon Shone through a broken cloud ; And near them they beheld a child ; Upon a crag he stood, A little crag, and all around Was spread the rising flood. The boatman plied the oar, the boat Approach'd his resting-place ; The moon-beam shone upon the child, And show'd how pale his face. " Now reach thine hand ! " the boatman cried, "Lord William, reach and save!
Página 327 - Old Kaspar took it from the boy, Who stood expectant by; And then the old man shook his head, And, with a natural sigh, "'Tis some poor fellow's skull," said he, "Who fell in the great victory.
Página 311 - But has heard of the Well of St. Keyne. An oak and an elm tree stand beside, And behind does an ash tree grow, And a willow from the bank above Droops to the water below. A traveller came to the Well of St. Keyne ; Joyfully he drew nigh, For from cock-crow he had been travelling, And there was not a cloud in the sky. He drank of the water so cool and clear, For thirsty and hot was he ; And he sat down upon the bank, Under the willow tree.

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