Modernization, Democracy, and Islam

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Shireen Hunter, Huma Malik, Center for Strategic and International Studies (Washington, D.C.)
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2005 - 361 páginas


The Islamic world has a poor record in terms of modernization and democracy. However, the source of this situation is not religion, but factors including colonialism, international economic and trading systems, and the role of the military, among others. Recognizing these themes allows the consideration of possible remedies for change in the Muslim world.

The Islamic world has a poor record in terms of modernization and democracy. However, the source of this situation is not religion--Islam--but rather factors including colonialism, international economic and trading systems, and the role of the military, among others. Recognizing these themes allows the consideration of possible remedies for change in the Muslim world.

The distinguished scholars contributing to this volume identify key factors--some intrinsic to the Muslim world, and some external--that contribute to Islam's current predicament. Contrary to much prevailing thought and opinion, Islam is neither monolithic nor impervious to change. It is neither anti-democratic nor inherently anti-modernization. Islam itself, as this book shows, is not the root cause of the malaise of the Islamic world.

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Contenido

Introduction
1
Culture and Development
21
Responses to Modernization Muslim Experience in a Comparative Perspective
35
Development and Democracy The Muslim World in a Comparative Perspective
52
Islam and Modernity Are They Compatible?
65
Islam and Democracy Is Modernization a Barrier?
82
Is Gender Inequality in Muslim Societies a Barrier to Modernization and Democratization?
98
The Role of the Military
117
Arab Liberal Legacies Full Circle
205
Hindrances to Democracy and Modernization in Indonesia
221
Malaysias Path to Modernization and Democratization
235
Islam Modernization and Democratization The Case of Iran
253
A Secular Democracy in the Muslim World The Turkish Model
277
Central Asia and Azerbaijan
293
The Roots of SubSaharan Africas Modernization and Democratization Dilemmas
310
Conclusion and Suggested Remedies
327

Lessons from Latin America for the Muslim World
133
The Political Geography of the Arab Private Sector
146
Systemic Factors and Economic Development in Islamic Countries
162
The Muslim Worlds Poor Record of Modernization and Democratization The Interplay of External and Internal Factors
186
Selected Bibliography
331
Index
351
About the Editors and Contributors
359
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Página 25 - ... a small number of very rich men have been able to lay upon the teeming masses of the laboring poor a yoke little better than that of slavery itself.
Página 111 - Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996).
Página 67 - Act in conformity with that maxim, and that maxim only, which you can at the same time will to be a universal law.
Página 205 - ... democratic rule. Democratic progress is found in many predominantly Muslim countries — in Turkey and Indonesia, and Senegal and Albania, Niger and Sierra Leone. Muslim men and women are good citizens of India and South Africa, of the nations of Western Europe, and of the United States of America. More than half of all the Muslims in the world live in freedom under democratically constituted governments. They succeed in democratic societies, not in spite of their faith, but because of it. A...
Página 18 - Daniel Lerner, The Passing of Traditional Society: Modernizing the Middle East ( Glencoe : The Free Press, 1958). 7. Everett Hagen, "The Theory of Economic Development,
Página 58 - Where self-organizing groups, movements, and individuals, relatively autonomous from the state, attempt to articulate values, create associations and solidarities, and advance their interests.
Página 25 - Italy, the extreme poverty and backwardness of which is to be explained largely (but not entirely) by the inability of the villagers to act together for their common good or, indeed, for any end transcending the immediate, material interest of the nuclear family.
Página 84 - I say autocracy, not despotism, since the sovereign was bound by and subject to the Holy Law, and was accepted by the people as rightful ruler, maintaining and maintained by the authority of the Holy Law . But still, it was authoritarian, often arbitrary, sometimes tyrannical. There are no parliaments or representative assemblies of any kind, no councils or communes, no chambers of nobility or estates, no municipalities in the history of Islam; nothing but the sovereign power, to which the subject...
Página 205 - Our commitment to democracy is also tested in the Middle East, which is my focus today, and must be a focus of American policy for decades to come. In many nations of the Middle East — countries of great strategic importance — democracy has not yet taken root.
Página 163 - ... dependence is a conditioning situation in which the economies of one group of countries are conditioned by the development and expansion of others. A relationship of interdependence between two or more economies or between such economies and the world trading system becomes a dependent relationship when some countries can expand through self-impulsion while others, being in a dependent position, can only expand as a reflection of the expansion...

Acerca del autor (2005)

Shireen T. Hunter is Director of the Islam Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Her areas of expertise include the Middle East--especially the Persian Gulf region--and Islam--particularly in Russia, Europe, and the United States. She is the author of The Future of Islam and the West: Clash of Civilizations or Peaceful Coexistence? (CSIS/Praeger, 1998) and editor of Islam: Europe's Second Religion (Praeger, 2002).

Huma Malik is a fellow in the CSIS Islam Program. Her research focuses on ethnic and sectarian conflicts in South Asia. She is the co-editor of two reports for CSIS, Islam in Europe and the United States: A Comparative Perspective and Integrating Muslim Communities in Europe and the United States (2003).

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