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is guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction therefor shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand nor less than one hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not less than ten days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

§ 447a. Negligently furnishing insecure scaffolding.--A person or corporation employing or directing another to do or perform any labor in the erection, repairing, altering or painting, any house, building or structure within this state, who knowingly or negligently furnishes or erects or causes to be furnished or erected for the performance of such labor, unsafe, unsuitable or improper scaffolding, hoists, stays, ladders or other mechanical contrivances; or who hinders or obstructs any officer detailed to inspect the same, destroys or defaces any notice posted thereon, or permits the use thereof after the same has been declared unsafe by such officer contrary to the provisions of article one of the labor law, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

Section 2. The penal code is hereby amended by inserting at the end of title twelve the following new section:

§ 447c. Neglect to complete or plank floors of buildings constructed in cities.-A person, constructing a building in a city, as owner or contractor, who violates the provisions of article one of the labor law, relating to the completing or laying of floors, or the planking of such floors or tiers of beams as the work of construction progresses, is guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction therefor shall be punished by a fine for each offense of not less than twenty-five nor more than two hundred dollars.

Section 3. The penal code is hereby amended by inserting at the end of title eleven the following new sections:

§ 384f. Failure to furnish statistics to commissioner of labor statistics.-Any person who refuses, when requested by the commissioner of labor statistics,

1. To admit him or a person authorized by him to a mine, factory, workshop, warehouse, elevator, foundry, machine shop or other manufacturing establishment; or,

2. To furnish him with information relative to his duties which may be in such person's possession or under his control; or,

3. To answer questions put by such commissioner in a circular or otherwise, or shall knowingly answer such questions untruthfully, is guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction therefor shall be punished by a fine of not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars.

§ 384g. Refusal to admit inspector to mines and quarries; failure to comply with requirements of inspector.–A person,

1. Refusing to admit the factory inspector, or any person authorized by him, to a mine or quarry, for the purpose of examination and inspection.

2. Neglecting or refusing to comply with the provisions of article nine of the labor law upon written notice of the factory inspector, is guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction therefor shall be punished by a fine of not less than fifty dollars, or by imprisonment for not less than thirty days.

§ 38th. Hours of labor to be required.-Any person or corporation,

1. Who, contracting with the state or a municipal corporation, shall require more than eight hours work for a day's labor; or

2. Who shall require more than ten hours labor, including one-half hour for dinner, to be performed within twelve consecutive hours, by the employees of a street surface and elevated railway owned or operated by corporations whose main line of travel or routes lie principally within the corporate limits of cities of more than one hundred thousand inhabitants; 01',

3. Who shall require the employees of a corporation owning or operating a brickyard to work more than ten hours in any one day or to commence work before seven o'clock in the morning, unless by agreement between employer and employee; or,

4. Who shall require the employees of a corporation operating a line of railroad of thirty miles in length or over, in whole or in part within this state to work contrary to the requirements of article one of the labor law, is guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction therefor shall be punished by a fine of not less than five hundred nor more than one thousand dollars for each offense. If any contractor with the state or a municipal corporation shall require more than eight hours for a day's labor, upon conviction therefor in addition to such fine, the contract shall be forfeited at the option of the municipal corporation.

$ 384i. Payment of wages.-A corporation or joint stock association or a person carrying on the business thereof, by lease or otherwise, who does not pay the wages of its employees in cash, weekly or monthly as provided in article one of the labor law, is guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction therefor, shall be fined not less than twenty-five nor more than fifty dollars for each offense.

g 384j. Failure to furnish seats for female employees.-Any person employing females in a factory or mercantile establishment who does not provide and maintain suitable seats for the use of such employees and permit the use thereof by such employees to such an extent as may be reasonable for the preservation of their health, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

$ 384k. No fees to be charged for services rendered by free public employment bureaus.-A person connected with or employed in a free publie employment bureau, who shall charge or receive, directly or indirectly, any fee or compensation from any person applying to such bureau for help or employment, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

$ 3811. Violations of provisions of labor law.–Any person who violates or does not comply with:

1. The provisions of article six of the labor law, relating to factories and the employment of children therein;

2. The provisions of article seven of the labor law, relating to tb facture of articles in tenements;

3. The provisions of article eight of the labor law, relating to bakeries and confectionery establishments, the employment of labor and the manufacture of flour or meal food products therein;

4. The provisions of article eleven of the labor law, relating to mercantile establishments, and the employment of women and children therein is guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be punished for a

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first offense by a fine of not less than twenty nor more than one hundred dollars; for a second offense by a fine of not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than thirty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment; for a third offense by a fine of not less than two hundred and fifty dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than sixty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

8 384m. Illegal practice of horseshoeing.--A person who presents to a county clerk, for the purpose of registration, a certificate purporting to qualify him to practice horseshoeing in a city of the first or second class, which has been fraudulently obtained, or practices as a horseshoer it any such city without complying with the provisions of article twelve of the labor law, or violates or neglects to comply with any of such provisions, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

Section 4. The following parts of acts are hereby repealed: Laws of

Chapter-

Section1870. 385.

4. 1871. 298.

2. 1883. 336.

3. 1886. 409.

21, first appearing. 1887. 529.

2. 1889. 381.

2. 1890. 388.

2. 1890. 394.

8, 20. 1892. 517.

5. 1892. 667.

2. 1893. 691.

3. 1894. 699.

8. 1895. 518.

7. 1896. 271.

6. 1896.

384.

11. 1896. 936.

5. 1896. 982.

6.

(Became a law May 13, 1897, with the approval of the Governor.)

CHILD LABOR. *

Certain Employments of Children Prohibited.

PENAL CODE: LAWS OF 1881, CHAPTER 676. $ 292. A person who employs or causes to be employed, or who exhibits, uses, or has in custody, or trains for the purpose of the exhibition, use or employment of, any child actually or apparently under the age of sixteen years; or who having the care, custody or control of such a child as parent, relative, guardian, employer, or otherwise, sells, lets out, gives away, so trains, or in any way procures or consents to the employment, or to such training, or use, or exhibition of such child; or who neglects or refuses to restrain such child from such training, or from engaging or acting, either

1. As a rope or wire walker, gymnast, wrestler, contortionist, rider or acrobat; or upon any bicycle or similar mechanical vehicle or contrivance; or,

2. In begging or receiving or soliciting alms in any manner or under any pretense, or in any mendicant occupation; or in gathering or picking rags, or collecting cigar stumps, bones or refuse from markets; or in peddling; or

3. In singing; or dancing; or playing upon a musical instrument; or in a theatrical exhibition; or in any wandering occupation; or,

4. In any illegal, indecent or immoral exhibition or practice; or in the exhibition of any such child when insane, idiotic, or when presenting the appearance of any deformity or unnatural physical formation or development; or

5. In any practice or exhibition or place dangerous or injurious to the life, limb, health or morals of the child, is guilty of a misdemeanor. But this section does not apply to the employment of any child as a singer or musician in a church, school or academy; or in teaching or learning the science or practice of music; or as a musician in any concert or in a theatrical exhibition, with the written consent of the mayor of the city, or the president of the board of trustees of the village where such concert or exhibition takes place. Such consent shall not be given unless ferty-eight hours' previous notice of the application shall have been served in writing upon the society mentioned in section two hundred and ninety-three of the Penal Code, if there be one within the county, and a hearing had thereon is requested, and shall be revocable at the will of the authority giving it. It shall specify the name of the child, its age, the names and residence of its parents or guardians, the nature, time, duration and number of performances permitted, together with the place and character of the exhibition. But no such consent shall be deemed

*For child labor in factories and mercantile establishments see articles VI and XI of the Labor Law.

to authorize any violation of the first, second, fourth or fifth subdivisions of this section. [As amended by L. 1884, ch. 46; L. 1886, ch. 31; L. 1892, ch. 309.]

Educational Restrictions.

LAWS OF 1891, CHAPTER 671, KNOWN AS THE COMPULSORY EDUCATION LAW

AND CONSTITUTING TITLE XVI OF THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL LAW. § 3. Required attendance upon instruction.—Every child between eight and sixteen years of age, in proper physical and mental condition to attend school, shall regularly attend upon instruction at a school in which at least the common school branches of reading, spelling, writing, arithmetic, English grammar and geography are taught, or upon equivalent instruction by a competent teacher elsewhere than at a school, as follows: Every such child between fourteen and sixteen years of age, not regularly and lawfully engaged in any useful employment or service, and erery such child between eight and twelve years of age, shall so attend upon instruction as many days annually, during the period between the first days of October and the following June, as the public school of the district or city in which such child resides, shall be in session during the same period. Every child between twelve and fourteen years of age in proper physical and mental condition to attend school, shall attend upon instruction during the school year then current, at least eighty secular days of actual attendance, which shall be consecutive except for holidays, vacations and detentions by sickness, which holidays, vacations and detentions shall not be counted as a part of such eighty days, and such child shall, in addition to the said eighty days, attend upon instruction when not regularly and lawfully engaged in useful employment or service. If any such child shall so attend upon instruction elsewhere than at a public school, such instruction shall be at least substantially equivalent to the instruction given to children of like age at the public school of the city or district in which such child resides; and such attendance shall be for at least as many hours of each day thereof, as are required of children of like age at public schools; and no greater total amount of holidays and vacations shall be deducted from such attendance during the period such attendance is required, than is allowed in such public school to children of like age. Occasional absences from such attendance, not amounting to irregular attendance in the fair meaning of the term, shall be allowed upon such excuses only as would be allowed in like cases by the general rules and practice of such public school. [As amended by L. 1896, ch. 606.]

$ 5. Persons employing children unlawfully to be fined.-It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to employ any child between the ages of eight and twelve years in any business or service whatever, during any part of the term during which the public schools of the district in which the child resides, are in session; or to employ any child between twelve and fourteen years of age who does not, at the time of such employment, present a certificate signed by the superintendent of schools of the city or district in which the child resides, or, where there is no

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