The National Geographic Magazine, Volumen22,Temas7-12

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National Geographic Society, 1911
 

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Página 860 - The pride of thine heart hath deceived thee, thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock, whose habitation is high ; that saith in his heart, Who shall bring me down to the ground ? Though thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and though thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the Lord.
Página 869 - ... evident through the fruiting of the Mulgoba in Florida in 1898 and subsequent years, there has been an active interest in the introduction of other reputed choice varieties of this most interesting fruit. A large number of such have been brought from India and some from other tropical countries by the Office of Seed and Plant Introduction of the Bureau of Plant Industry, while private enterprise has become sufficiently interested to import considerable numbers of certain sorts. Of those that...
Página 639 - Collectively they have learned the value of organized effort, of cooperation, and of compromise; and the social instinct has been developed in them — a matter of great importance in rural districts, where the isolated condition of the people has long been a great hindrance to progress. 3. The influence upon the communities at large, the parents as well as the children, has been wholesome. Beginning with an...
Página 627 - At this camp we killed five poisonous snakes: a lightcolored tree snake, two puff adders, and two seven-foot cobras. One of the latter three times "spat" or ejected its poison at us, the poison coming out from the fangs like white films or threads, to a distance of several feet. A few years ago the singular power of this snake, and perhaps of certain other African species, thus to eject the poison at the face of an assailant was denied by scientists; but it is now well known. Selous had already told...
Página 639 - The general advantages that may be expected from the inauguration of boys' and girls' club work have been demonstrated by abundant experience in clubs aggregating probably more than 200,000 members. They have been summarized as follows: 1. Individually the members of such clubs have been led to observe more closely, to recognize good and bad qualities in the products they have grown, and in the insects, fungi, and other various conditions affecting their work; they have met and learned to solve some...
Página 705 - ... or four to forty or fifty. Each family has its own portion of this ruai, and in each there is a small fireplace, which consists of a slab of stone, at which the men warm themselves, when they get up, as they usually do, in the chill of the early morning before the sun has risen. Over this fireplace hangs the most valuable ornament in the eyes of the Dyak, the bunch of human heads. These are the heads obtained when on the warpath by various members of the family — dead and living — and are...
Página 872 - ... in the Rocky Mountains Park. Canada, safe and comfortable. In recognition of this generous act, the people of Montana and Alberta have called this particular highway "The Brooklyn Eagle Trail." , PUBLIC CAMP FOR BELLY RIVER. The Belly River region is known to but relatively few people, but all who have seen it declare it to be one of the most beautiful mountian areas in the entire national park system.
Página 717 - ... it from the rock. The spear is then withdrawn until the head is within reach of the second man, who takes the nest off the prongs and puts it in a pouch carried at the waist.
Página 1113 - Treasury shall lease, for the rental mentioned in section six of this act, to proper and responsible parties, to the best advantage of the United States, having due regard to the interests of the Government, the native inhabitants, the parties heretofore engaged in trade, and the protection of the seal fisheries...
Página 603 - From the peculiar character of the articulations of the limb- bones, it is inferred that these animals were largely aquatic in their habits, and fed on some abundant species of water plants. One can readily see the advantage of the long neck in browsing off the vegetation on the bottom of shallow lakes, while the animal was submerged, or in rearing the head aloft to scan the surrounding shores for the approach of an enemy. Or, with the tail as a counterpoise, the entire body could be reared out of...

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