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ARTICLE I.

The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order still further to promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two Powers, mutually agree to give the most careful and favorable attention to the representations of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

ARTICLE II.

The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the ports of the United States; and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China, to transport it from one open port to any other open port, or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports of China. This absolute prohibition which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power, and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of China and the United States; and the benefits of the favored nation clause in existing Treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens or subjects of either Power as against the provisions of this article.

ARTICLE III.

His Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of China hereby promises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues, or duties for imports or exports, or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States, or upon the produce manufactures or merchandise imported in the same from the United States, or from any foreign country; or upon the produce manufactures or merchandise exported in the same to the United States or to any foreign country, or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes of any other nation or on those of Chinese subjects.

The United States hereby promise and agree that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to the subjects of His Imperial Majesty, and coming either directly or by way of any foreign port, from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign trade, to the ports of the United States, or returning therefrom either directly or by way of any foreign port, to any of the open ports of China; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China or from any foreign country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, or coastwise trade; or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

ARTICLE IV.

When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of the United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined and decided by the public officers of the two nations, it is agreed between the Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trial and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilities for watching the proceedings in the interests of justice. If he so desires, he shall have the right to present, to examine and to cross examine witnesses. If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall be permitted to protest against them in detail. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking in English and Chinese, being three originals of each text, of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord, 1880. Kuanghsü, sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

JAMES B. ANGELL.

SEAL.
JOHN F. SWIFT.

SEAL.
WM. HENRY TRESCOT. SEAL.
PAO CHÜN.
LI HUNGTSAO.

(SEAL.]

1894.

CONVENTION REGULATING CHINESE IMMIGRATION.

Concluded March 17, 1894; ratification advised by the Senate August

13, 1894; ratified by the President August 22, 1894; rutifications erchanged December 7, 1894; proclaimed December 8, 1894. (U. S. Stats., Vol. 29, p. 1210.)

ARTICLES.

I. Immigration of Chinese laborers ! IV. Protection of Chinese in the United prohibited for ten years.

States. II. Regulations for return to the V. Registration of citizens in China. United States.

VI. Duration. III. Classes of Chinese not affected.

Whereas, on the 17th day of November A. D. 1880, and of Kwanghsü, the sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day, a Treaty was concluded between the United States and China for the purpose of regulating, limiting, or suspending the coming of Chinese laborers to, and their residence in, the United States;

And whereas the Government of China, in view of the antagonism and much deprecated and serious disorders to which the presence of Chinese laborers has given rise in certain parts of the United States, desires to prohibit the emigration of such laborers from China to the United States;

And whereas the two Governments desire to co-operate in prohibiting such immigration, and to strengthen in other ways the bonds of friendship between the two countries;

And whereas the two Governments are desirous of adopting reciprocal measures for the better protection of the citizens or subjects of each within the jurisdiction of the other;

Now, therefore, the President of the United States has appointed Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State of the United States, as his Plenipotentiary, and Ilis Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of China has appointed Yang Yü, Officer of the second rank, Sub-Director of the Court of Sacrificial Worship, and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States of America, as his Plenipotentiary; and the said Plenipotentiaries having exhibited their respective Full Powers found to be in due and good form, have agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

The High Contracting Parties agree that for a period of ten years, beginning with the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention, the coming, except under the conditions hereinafter specified, of Chinese laborers to the United States shall be absolutely prohibited.

ARTICLE II.

The preceding Article shall not apply to the return to the United States of any registered Chinese laborer who has a lawful wife, child, or parent in the United States, or property therein of the value of one thousand dollars, or debts of like amount due him and pending settlement. Nevertheless every such Chinese laborer shall, before leaving the United States, deposit, as a condition of his return, with the collector of customs of the district from which he departs, a full description in writing of his family, or property, or debts, as aforesaid, and shall be furnished by said collector with such certificate of his right to return under this Treaty as the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe and not inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty; and should the written description aforesaid be proved to be false, the right of return thereunder, or of continued residence after return, shall in each case be forfeited. And such right of return to the United States shall be exercised within one year from the date of leaving the United States; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an additional period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness or other cause of disability beyond his control, such Chinese laborer shall be rendered unable sooner to return—which facts shall be fully reported to the Chinese consul at the port of departure, and by him certified, to the satisfaction of the collector of the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no such Chinese laborer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea without producing to the proper officer of the customs the return certificate herein required.

ARTICLE III.

The provisions of this Convention shall not affect the right at present enjoyed of Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants or travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not laborers, of coming to the United States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese subjects as are above described to admission into the United States, they may produce a certificate from their Government or the Government where they last resided viséd by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the country or port whence they depart.

It is also agreed that Chinese laborers shall continue to enjoy the privilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the course of their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations by the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent said privilege of transit from being abused.

ARTICLE IV.

In pursuance of Article III of the Immigration Treaty between the United States and China, signed at Peking on the 17th day of November, 1880, (the 15th day of the tenth month of Kwanghsü, sixth year) it is hereby understood and agreed that Chinese laborers or Chinese of any other class, either permanently or temporarily residing in the United States, shall have for the protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the United States to citizens of the most favored nation, excepting the right to become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms its obligation, as stated in said Article III, to exert all its power to secure protection to the persons and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

ARTICLE V. The Government of the United States, having by an Act of the Congress, approved May 5, 1892, as amended by an Act approved November 3, 1893, required all Chinese laborers lawfully within the limits of the United States before the passage of the first named Act to be registered as in said Acts provided, with a view of affording them better protection, the Chinese Government will not object to the enforcement of such acts, and reciprocally the Government of the United States recognizes the right of the Government of China to enact and enforce similar laws or regulations for the registration, free of charge, of all laborers, skilled or unskilled, (not merchants as defined by said Acts of Congress), citizens of the United States in China, whether residing within or without the treaty ports.

And the Government of the United States agrees that within twelve months from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention, and annually, thereafter, it will furnish to the Government of China registers or reports showing the full name, age, occupation and number or place of residence of all other citizens of the United States, including missionaries, residing both within and without the treaty ports of China, not including, however, diplomatic and other officers of the United States residing or travelling in China upon official business, together with their body and household servants.

ARTICLE VI. This Convention shall remain in force for a period of ten years beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications, and, if six months before the expiration of the said period of ten years, neither Government shall have formally given notice of its final termination to the other, it shall remain in full force for another like period of ten years.

In faith whereof, we, the respective plenipotentiaries, have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals. Done, in duplicate, at Washington, the 17th day of March, A. D. 1894.

WALTER Q. GRESHAM SEAL.
YANG YÜ.

SEAL.

COLOMBIA.

The Republic of Colombia, established in 1819, was divided in November, 1831, into three independent republics, New Grenada, Venezuela, and Ecuador. In 1862 its name was changed to the United States of Colombia, and in 1886 the States were abolished and the country became the Republic of Colombia. The treaties with New Grenada are given in chronological order with those of Colombia.

1824. TREATY OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION. Concluded October 3, 1824; ratification advised by the Senate March 3,

1825; ratified by the President March 7, 1825; ratifications exchanged May 27, 1825; proclaimed May 31, 1825. (Treaties and Conven

tions, 1889, p. 186.) • This treaty of thirty-one articles expired by its own limitation October 3, 1836.

(NEW GRANADA).

1846.

TREATY OF PEACE, AMITY, NAVIGATION, AND COMMERCE. Concluded December 12, 1846; ratification advised by the Senate June

3, 1848; ratified by the President June 10, 1848; ratifications exchanged June 10, 1848; proclaimed June 12, 1848. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 195.)

ARTICLES
I. Amity.

XX. Blockade.
II. Most-favored-nation clause. XXI. Visitation and search.
III. Commerce and navigation. XXII. Proof of nationality of vessels.
IV. Mutual privileges of shipping. XXIII. Vessels under convoy.
V. Customs duties.

XXIV. Prize cases.
VI. Declaration of reciprocal XXV. Conduct of hostilities.
treatment.

XXVI. Letters of marque.
VII. Freedom of trade.

XXVII. Protection in case of war. VIII. Embargo.

XXVIII. Confiscation prohibited.
IX. Asylum to vessels.

XXIX. Diplomatic privileges.
X. Captures by pirates.

XXX. Consular officers.
XI. Shipwrecks.

XXXI. Consular rights. XII. Disposal of property.

XXXII. Consular exemptions. XIII. Mutual protection.

XXXIII. Deserters from 'ships. XIV. Religious freedom.

XXXIV. Agreement for consular conXV. Neutrality; free ships, free

vention. goods.

XXXV. Isthmus of Panama; duraXVI. Enemy's property.

tion; violations. XVII. Contraband goods.

XXXVI. Ratification. XVIII. Trade by neutrals

Additional article. Acceptance of naXIX. Confiscation of contraband. tionality of vessels. The United States of North America and the Republic of New Granada in South America, desiring to make lasting and firm the friendship and good understanding which happily exist between both nations

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