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1872.

NATURALIZATION CONVENTION. Concluded July 20, 1872; ratification advised by the Senate January

13, 1873; ratified by the President January 22, 1873; ratifications exchanged March 14, 1873; proclaimed April 15, 1873. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 241.)

ARTICLES.

I. Naturalization recognized.

| IV. Duration. II. Readmission to former status.

V. Ratification. III. Renunciation of acquired status.

The United States of America and his Majesty the King of Denmark being desirous to regulate the citizenship of the citizens of the United States of America who have emigrated, or who may emigrate, from the United States of America to the Kingdom of Denmark, and of Danish subjects who have emigrated, or who may emigrate from the Kingdom of Denmark to the United States of America, have resolved to conclude a Convention for that purpose, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say,

The President of the United States of America:
Michael J. Cramer,
Minister Resident of the United States of America at Copenhagen;
and His Majesty the King of Denmark:
Otto Ditlev Baron Rosenörn-Lehn,

Commander of Danebrog and Danebrogsmand, Chamberlain, His Majesty's Minister for Foreign Affairs, &c., &c., &c.; who, after having communicated to each other their respective full Powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles, to wit:

ARTICLE I. Citizens of the United States of America who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized, according to law, within the Kingdom of Denmark as Danish subjects, shall be held by the United States of America to be in all respects and for all purposes Danish subjects, and shall be treated as such by the United States of America.

In like manner, Danish subjects who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized, according to law, within the United States of America as citizens thereof, shall be held by the Kingdom of Denmark to be in all respects and for all purposes as citizens of the United States of America, and shall be treated as such by the Kingdom of Denmark.

ARTICLE II. If any such citizen of the United States, as aforesaid, naturalized within the Kingdom of Denmark as a Danish subject, should renew his residence in the United States, the United States Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may see fit to impose, readmit him to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States, and the Danish Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a Danish subject on account of his former naturalization.

In like manner, if any such Danish subject, as aforesaid, naturalized within the United States as a citizen thereof, should renew his

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residence within the Kingdom of Denmark, His Majesty's Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, readmit him to the character and privileges of a Danish subject, and the United States Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a citizen of the United States on account of his former naturalization.

ARTICLE III. If, however, a citizen of the United States, naturalized in Denmark, shall renew his residence in the former country without the intent to return to that in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization.

In like manner, if a Dane, naturalized in the United States, shall renew his residence in Denmark without the intent to return to the former country, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States.

The intent not to return may be held to exist, when a person naturalized in the one country shall reside more than two years in the other country.

ARTICLE IV. The present convention shall go into effect immediately on or after the exchange of the ratifications, and shall continue in force for ten years. If neither party shall have given to the other six months previous notice of its intention then to terminate the same, it shall further remain in force until the end of twelve months after either of the Contracting Parties shall have given notice to the other of such intention.

ARTICLE V. The present Convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by His Majesty the King of Denmark, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Copenhagen as soon as may be within eight months from the date hereof.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto their respective seals.

Done at Copenhagen the twentieth day of July, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy Two.

MICHAEL J. CRAMER.

[SEAL.]
0. D. ROSENÖRN-LEHN.

[SEAL.]

1888. AGREEMENT SUBMITTING CLAIM OF CARLOS BUTTERFIELD & Co.,

TO ARBITRATION. Concluded December 6, 1888; ratification advised by the Senate Feb

ruary 11, 1889; ratified by the President April 23, 1889; ratifications exchanged May 23, 1889; proclaimed May 24, 1889. (U. S. Stats. Vol. 26, p. 1490.)

By this agreement the claim of Butterfield & Co., for indemnity for seizure of vessels by the Danish colonial authorities of St. Thomas, West Indies, was referred to Sir Edmund Monson, by whom it was disallowed.

1892.

TRADE-MARK CONVENTION.

Concluded June 15, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate July 21,

1892; ratified by the President July 29, 1892; ratifications exchanged September 28, 1892; proclaimed October 12, 1892. (U. S. Stats. Vol. 27, p. 963.)

ARTICLES.

I. Reciprocal rights. II. Formalities.

III. Duration.
IV. Ratification.

With a view to secure for the manufacturers in the United States of America, and those in Denmark, the reciprocal protection of their Trade Marks and Trade Labels, the Undersigned, duly authorised to that effect, have agreed on the following dispositions.

ARTICLE I.

The subjects or citizens of each of the High Contracting Parties shall in the Dominions and Possessions of the other have the same rights as belong to native subjects or citizens, in everything relating to Trade Marks and Trade Labels of every kind.

Provided, always, that in the United States the subjects of Denmark, and in Denmark, the citizens of the United States of America, cannot enjoy these rights to a greater extent or for a longer period of time than in their native country.

ARTICLE II. Any person in either country desiring protection of his Trade Mark in the Dominions of the other must fulfil the formalities required by the law of the latter; but no person, being a subject or citizen of one of the contracting States, shall be entitled to claim protection in the other by virtue of the provisions of this convention, unless he shall have first secured protection in his own country in accordance with the laws thereof.

ARTICLE III. This arrangement shall go into effect immediately on or after the exchange of the ratifications and shall be in force until a year after it has been recalled by the one or the other of the two High Parties.

ARTICLE IV. The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof and by His Majesty the King of Denmark, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Copenhagen as soon as may be within ten months from the date hereof.

In witness whereof the Undersigned have signed the present convention and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms. Done at Copenhagen in double expedition the 15. June 1892.

CLARK E. CARR.

(SEAL.] REEDTZ THOTT.

[SEAL.]

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.

1867.

CONVENTION OF AMITY, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION, AND EXTRA

DITION. Concluded February 8, 1867; ratification advised by the Senate March

20, 1867; ratified by the President July 31, 1867; ratifications exchanged October 5, 1867; proclaimed October 24, 1867. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 244.)

This convention of thirty-two articles terminated January 13, 1898, by notice from the Dominican Government.

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ECUADOR.

1839.

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, NAVIGATION, AND COMMERCE.

Concluded June 13, 1839; ratification adrised by the Senate July 15,

1840; ratified by the President July 31, 1840; ratifications exchanged April 9, 1842; proclaimed September 23, 1842. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 255.)

This treaty of thirty-five articles was abrogated August 25, 1892, by notice from the Ecuadorian Government.

1862.

CLAIMS CONVENTION.

Concluded November 25, 1862; ratification advised by the Senate Jan

uary 28, 1863; ratified by the President February 13, 1863; ratifications exchanged July 27, 1864; proclaimed September 8, 1864. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 265.)

Under this convention of seven articles the commission of two members and an arbitrator met at Guayaquil August 22, 1864, and terminated its session August 17, 1865. The amount awarded against Ecuador was $94,799.56.

1872.

NATURALIZATION CONVENTION.

Concluded May 6, 1872; ratification advised by the Senate May 23,

1872; ratified by the President May 25, 1872; ratifications exchanged November 6, 1873; proclaimed November 24, 1873. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 267.)

This convention of seven articles was abrogated August 25, 1892, upon notice given by the Ecuadorian Government.

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