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ARTICLE V.

If the individual claimed by one of the two High Contracting Parties, in pursuance of the present Convention, should also be claimed by one or several other Powers on account of crimes or offenses committed within their respective jurisdictions, his extradition shall be granted to that state whose demand is first received.

The provisions of this Article, and also of Articles II to IV, inclusive, of the present Convention, shall apply to surrender for offenses specified in the aforesaid Tenth Article, as well as to surrender for offenses specified in this Convention.

ARTICLE VI.

The extradition of fugitives under the provisions of this Convention and of the said Tenth Article shall be carried out in the United States and in Her Majesty's dominions, respectively, in conformity with the laws regulating extradition for the time being in force in the surrendering State.

ARTICLE VII.

The provisions of the said Tenth Article and of this Convention shall apply to persons convicted of the crimes therein respectively named and specified, whose sentence therefor shall not have been executed.

In case of a fugitive criminal alleged to have been convicted of the crime for which his surrender is asked, a copy of the record of the conviction and of the sentence of the court before which such conviction took place, duly authenticated, shall be produced, together with the evidence proving that the prisoner is the person to whom such sentence refers.

ARTICLE VIII.

The present Convention shall not apply to any of the crimes herein specified which shall have been committed, or to any conviction which shall have been pronounced, prior to the date at which the Convention shall come into force.

ARTICLE IX.

This Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at London as soon as possible.

It shall come into force ten days after its publication, in conformity with the forms prescribed by the laws of the High Contracting Parties, and shall continue in force until one or the other of the Iligh Contracting Parties shall signify its wish to terminate it, and no longer.

In witness whereof, the undersigned have signed the same and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at the city of Washington, this twelfth day of July, 1889.

SEAL.

JAMES G. BLAINE.
SEAL.

JULIAN PAUNCEFOTE.

1892.

CONVENTION RELATING TO FUR-SEALS IN BEHRING SEA.

Concluded February 29, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate

March 29, 1892; ratified by the President April 22, 1892; ratifications exchanged May 19, 1892; proclaimed May 9, 1892. (Ú. S. Stats., Vol. 27, p. 947.)

By this convention of fifteen articles the questions “concerning the jurisdictional rights of the United States in the waters of Behring's Sea, and concerning also the preservation of the fur-seal in, or habitually resorting to, the said Sea, and the rights of the citizens and subjects of either country as regards the taking of fur-seal in, or habitually resorting to, the said waters," were submitted to a tribunal of seven arbitrators, appointed, two by the President of the United States, two by Her Britannic Majesty, one by the President of the French Republic, one by the King of Italy, and one by the King of Sweden and Norway. It was provided by Article VI that

“In deciding the matters submitted to the Arbitrators, it is agreed that the following five points shall be submitted to them, in order that their award shall embrace a distinct decision upon each of said five points, to wit:

1. What exclusive jurisdiction in the sea known as the Behring's Sea, and what exclusive rights in the seal fisheries therein, did Russia assert and exercise prior and up to the time of the cession of Alaska to the United States?

2. How far were these claims of jurisdiction as to the seal fisheries recognized and conceded by Great Britain?

3. Was the body of water now known as the Behring's Sea included in the phrase “Pacific Ocean”, as used in the Treaty of 1825 between Great Britain and Russia; and what rights, if any, in the Behring's Sea were held and exclusively exercsied by Russia after said Treaty?

4. Did not all the rights of Russia as to jurisdiction, and as to the seal fisheries in Behring's Sea east of the water boundary, in the Treaty between the United States and Russia of the 30th March, 1867, pass unimpaired to the United States under that Treaty?

5. Has the United States any right, and if so, what right of protection or property in the fur-seals frequenting the islands of the United States in Behring Sea when such seals are found

outside the ordinary three-mile limit?” The tribunal met at Paris, February 23, 1893, and delivered their decision August 15, 1893. The decision having been against the contention of the United States, a convention was concluded February 8, 1896 (see p. 267), for the creation of a commission to assess the damages to be paid to the British claimants.

1892.

CONVENTION FOR THE RENEWAL OF THE EXISTING MODUS VIVENDI

IN BEHRING SEA.

Concluded April 18, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate April 19,

1892; ratified by the President April 22, 1892; ratifications exchanged May 7, 1892; proclaimed May 9, 1892. (U.S. Stats., Vol. 27, p. 952.)

By this convention of seven articles both Governments prohibited the killing of fur seals by their respective citizens and subjects in the eastern part of Behring Sea during the pendency of the fur-seal arbitration.

1892.

TREATY FOR THE RECOVERY OF DESERTERS FROM MERCHANT

VESSELS.

Concluded June 3, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate June 30,

1892; ratified by the President July 14, 1892; ratifications exchanged August 1, 1892; proclaimed August 1, 1892. (U. S. Stats., Vol. 27, p. 961.)

'ARTICLES

I. Arrests of deserting seamen. II. Ratification.

III. Duration,

Whereas the Governments of the United States of America and of Great Britain are desirous to make provision for the apprehension, recovery and restoration of persons who may desert from merchant vessels of their respective countries while in the ports of the other country, and to conclude a treaty for the above purpose, the High Contracting Parties have accordingly appointed as their Plenipotentiaries to conclude the said treaty, that is to say:

The President of the United States of America, James G. Blaine, Secretary of State of the United States; and

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Sir Julian Pauncefote, G. C. M. G., K. C. B., Her Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers found in due and good form, have agreed upon the following articles.

ARTICLE I.

The Consuls General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls and Consular Agents of either of the High Contracting Parties, residing in the dominions, possessions or colonies of the other, shall have power to require from the proper authorities the assistance provided by law for the apprehension, recovery and restoration of seamen who may desert from any ship belonging to a citizen or subject of their respective countries, while in the ports of the other country. If, however, any such deserter shall have committed any crime or offence in the country where he is found, his surrender or restoration may be delayed until the proper tribunal before which the case shall be pending or may be cognizable, shall have pronounced its sentence and the sentence shall have been carried into effect.

It is understood that the preceding stipulations shall not apply to the citizens or subjects of the country where the desertion shall take place.

ARTICLE II.

The present Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington or at London without delay.

ARTICLE III.

The present Treaty shall come into operation at the expiration of thirty days from the date of the exchange of ratifications. It shall remain in force for five years after that date and thereafter until terminated by a twelve months' notice to be given by either High Contracting Party to the other.

In faith whereof, we, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and have hereunto affixed our Seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington, this third day of June, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two.

JAMES G. BLAINE [SEAL.]
JULIAN PAUNCEFOTE (SEAL.

1892.

CONVENTION FOR DELIMITING BOUNDARIES NOT PERMANENTLY

MARKED.

Concluded July 22, 1892; ratification advised by the Senate July 25,

1892; ratified by the President July 29, 1892; ratifications exchanged August 23, 1892; proclaimed August 26, 1892. (U. S. Stats., Vol. 27, p. 955.)

ARTICLES.

I. Commissions to survey Alaskan boundary.
II. Commission to mark the boundary in Passamaquoddy Bay.
III. Ratification.

The United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, being equally desirous to provide for the removal of all possible cause of difference between their respective governments hereafter in regard to the delimitation of the existing boundary between the United States and Her Majesty's possessions in North America in respect to such portions of said boundary as may not in fact have been permanently marked in virtue of treaties heretofore concluded; have resolved to conclude a Convention in furtherance of these ends, and for that purpose have appointed as their respective plenipotentiaries;

The President of the United States, John W. Foster, Secretary of State of the United States, and

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, The Honorable Michael H. Herbert, Chargé d'Affaires ad interim of Great Britain,

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form, have agreed to and concluded the following Articles:

ARTICLE I.

The High Contracting Parties agree that a coincident or joint survey (as may be found in practice most convenient) shall be made of the territory adjacent to that part of the boundary line of the United States of America and the Dominion of Canada dividing the Territory of Alaska from the Province of British Columbia and the Northwest Territory of Canada, from the latitude of 54° 40' North to the point where the said boundary line encounters the 141st degree of longitude westward from the meridian of Greenwich, by Commissions to be appointed severally by the High Contracting Parties, with a view to the ascertainment of the facts and data necessary to the permanent delimitation of said boundary line in accordance with the spirit and intent of the existing treaties in regard to it between Great Britain and Russia and between the United States and Russia.

Application will be made without delay to the respective legislative bodies for the appropriations necessary for the prosecution of the survey, and the Commissions to be appointed by the two governments shall meet at Ottawa within two months after said appropriation shall have been made, and shall proceed as soon as practicable there after to the active discharge of their duties.

The respective Commissions shall complete the survey and submit their final reports thereof within two years from the date of their first meeting

The Commissions shall, so far as they may be able to agree, make a joint report to each of the two governments, and they shall also report, either jointly or severally, to each government on any points upon which they may be unable to agree.

Each government shall pay the expenses of the Commission appointed by it.

Each government engages to facilitate in every possible way any operations which, in pursuance of the plan to be agreed upon by the Commissions, may be conducted within its territory by the Commission of the other.

The High Contracting Parties agree that, as soon as practicable after the report or reports of the Commissions shall have been received, they will proceed to consider and establish the boundary line in question.

ARTICLE II.

The High Contracting Parties agree that the Governments of the United States and of Her Britannic Majesty in behalf of the Dominion of Canada shall, with as little delay as possible, appoint two Commissioners, one to be named by each party, to determine upon a method of more accurately marking the boundary line between the two countries in the waters of Passamaquoddy Bay in front of and adjacent to Eastport, in the State of Maine, and to place buoys or fix such other boundary marks as they may determine to be necessary.

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