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Each government shall pay the expenses of its own Commissioner, and cost of marking the boundary in such manner as shall be determined upon shall be defrayed by the High Contracting Parties in equal moieties.

ARTICLE III.

The present Convention shall be duly ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Her Britannic Majesty; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington within twelve months from the date hereof, or earlier if possible.

In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington the 22d day of July one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two.

JOHN W. FOSTER. SEAL.
MICHAEL H HERBERT (SEAL.

1894.

CONVENTION EXTENDING THE TERMS OF THE ALASKAN BOUNDARY

COMMISSIONS.

Concluded February 3, 1894; ratification advised by the Senate Feb

ruary 12, 1894; ratified by the President February 15, 1894; ratifications exchanged March 28, 1894; proclaimed March 28, 1894. (U. S. Stats., Vol. XXVIII, p. 1200.)

ARTICLES.

I. Term of commissions extended.

| II. Ratification.

The Governments of the United States of America and of Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, being credibly advised that the labors of the Commission organized pursuant to the Convention which was concluded between the High Contracting Parties at Washington, July 22, 1892, providing for the delimitation of the existing boundary between the United States and Her Majesty's possessions in North America in respect to such portions of said boundary line as may not in fact have been permanently marked in virtue of treaties heretofore concluded, can not be accomplished within the period of two years from the first meeting of the Commission as fixed by that Convention, have deemed it expedient to conclude a supplementary convention extending the term for a further period and for this purpose have named as their respective plenipotentiaries :

The President of the United States, Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State of the United States, and

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, His Excellency Sir Julian Pauncefote, G. C. B., G. C. M. G., Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Great Britain;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers which were found to be in due and proper form, have agreed upon the following articles :

ARTICLE I.

The third paragraph of Article I of the Convention of July 22, 1892, states that the respective Commissions shall complete the survey and submit their final reports thereof within two years from the date of their first meeting. The Joint Commissioners held their first meeting November 28, 1892 ; hence the time allowed by that Convention expires November 28, 1894. Believing it impossible to complete the required work within the specified period, the two Governments hereby mutually agree to extend the time to December 31, 1895.

ARTICLE II.

The present Convention shall be duly ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Her Britannic Majesty, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington at the earliest practicable date.

In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington, the 3d day of February, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four.

SEAL. W. Q. GRESHAM
SEAL. JULIAN PAUNCEFOTE

1896.

CLAIMS CONVENTION. Concluded February 8, 1896; ratification advised by the Senate with

amendments April 15, 1896; ratified by the President April 23, 1896; ratifications exchanged June 3, 1896; proclaimed June 11, 1896. (U. S. Stats., Vol. 29, p. 844.)

This convention provided for a commission to settle the claims presented by Great Britain for the losses sustained by the seizures of British vessels for fur sealing in the Bering Sea, under the provisions of the award of the Paris Tribunal of 1893. The two commissioners authorized by the convention held their first session at Victoria, British Columbia, November 25, 1896, and December 17, 1897, rendered an award of $473,151.26 against the United States.

GREECE.

1837.

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.

Concluded December 22, 1837; ratification advised by the Senate March

26, 1838; ratified by the President April 12, 1838; ratifications exchanged June 13, 1838; proclaimed August 30, 1838. (Treaties and Conventions, 1889, p. 502.)

ARTICLES.

I. Freedom of commerce.
II. Tonnage duties, etc.
III. Imports.
IV. Exports.
V. Coasting trade.
VI. Government purchases.
VII. Navigation duties.
VIII. No discriminating prohibitions.
IX. Transit, bounties, and draw-

backs.

X. Vessels entering without un

loading.
XI. Unloading part of cargo.
XII. Consular officers and privileges.
XIII. Deserters from ships.
XIV. Shipwrecks.
XV. Quarantine.
XVI. Blockades.
XVII. Duration.
XVIII. Ratification.

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of Greece, equally animated with the sincere desire of maintaining the relations of good understanding which have hitherto so happily subsisted between their respective States, of extending also and consolidating the commercial intercourse between them; and convinced that this object cannot better be accomplished than by adopting the system of an entire freedom of Navigation, and a perfect reciprocity, based upon principles of equity equally beneficial to both countries; Have, in consequence, agreed to enter into negotiations for the conclusion of a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and for that purpose have appointed Plenipotentiaries; The President of the United States of America, Andrew Stevenson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States, near the Court of Her Britannic Majesty, and His Majesty the King of Greece, Spiridion Tricoupi Councillor of State on Special Service, his Envoy Extraordinary, and Minister Plenipotentiary near the same Court, Grand Commander of the Royal Order of the Saviour, Grand Cross of the American Order of Isabella the Catholic, Who, after having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:

ARTICLE I.

The Citizens and subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties may, with all security for their persons, vessels, and cargoes, freely enter the ports, places, and rivers of the Territories of the other, wherever Foreign Commerce is permitted. They shall be at liberty to sojourn and reside in all parts whatsoever of said territories; to rent and occupy houses and warehouses for their commerce, and they shall enjoy, generally, the most entire security and protection in their Mercantile Transactions, on conditions of their submitting to the Laws and Ordinances of the Respective Countries.

ARTICLE II.

Greek vessels arriving either laden or in ballast, into the Ports of the United States of America, from whatever place they may come, shall be treated on their entrance, during their stay, and at their departure upon the same footing as National Vessels coming from the same place, with respect to the duties of tonnage, light houses, pilotage, and port charges, as well as to the perquisites of Public Officers, and all other duties or charges of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishment whatsoever.

And, reciprocally, the Vessels of the United States of America arriving either laden, or in ballast, into the Ports of the Kingdom of Greece, from whatever place they may come, shall be treated on their entrance, during their stay, and at their departure upon the same footing as National Vessels coming from the same place, with respect to the duties of tonnage, light-houses, pilotage, and port charges, as well as to the perquisites of Public Officers; and all other duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever

ARTICLE III.

All that may be lawfully imported into the United States of America, in Vessels of the said States, may also be thereinto imported in Greek Vessels, from whatever place they may come, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if imported in National Vessels.

And, reciprocally, all that may be lawfully imported into the Kingdom of Greece, in Greek Vessels, may also be thereinto imported, in Vessels of the United States of America, from whatever place they may come, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if imported in National Vessels.

ARTICLE IV.

All that may be lawfully exported from th: United States of America, in Vessels of the said States, may also be exported therefrom in Greek Vessels, without paying other or higher duties or charges of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if exported in National Vessels.

And, reciprocally, all that may be lawfully exported from the Kingdom of Greece, in Greek Vessels, may also be exported therefrom in Vessels of the United States of America, without paying other or higher duties or charges, of whatever kind or denomination, levied in the name, or to the profit of the Government, the Local Authorities, or of any Private Establishments whatsoever, than if exported in National Vessels.

ARTICLE V.

It is expressly understood that the foregoing second, third, and fourth Articles are not applicable to the Coast-wise Navigation from one Port of the United States of America to another Port of the said States; nor to the navigation from one port of the Kingdom of Greece to another port of the said Kingdom, which navigation each of the two High Contracting Parties reserves to itself.

ARTICLE VI.

Each of the two High Contracting Parties engages not to grant, in its purchases, or in those which might be made by Companies or Agents acting in its name, or under its authority, any preference to importations made in its own vessels, or in those of a third Power, over those made in the vessels of the other Contracting Party.

ARTICLE VII.

The two High Contracting Parties engage not to impose upon the Navigation between their respective Territories, in the vessels of either, any tonnage or other duties of any kind or denomination, which shall be higher or other than those which shall be imposed on every other Navigation, except that which they have reserved to themselves respectively by the fifth Article of the present Treaty.

ARTICLE VIII.

There shall not be established in the United States of America, upon the products of the soil or industry of the Kingdom of Greece, any prohibition or restriction of importation or exportation, nor any duties of any kind or denomination whatsoever, unless such prohibitions, restrictions, and duties shall likewise be established upon articles of like nature, the growth of any other Country;

And, reciprocally, there shall not be established in the Kingdom of Greece on the products of the soil or industry of the United States of America, any prohibition or restriction of importation or exportation, nor any duties of any kind or denomination whatsoever, unless such prohibitions, restrictions, and duties be likewise established upon articles of like nature, the growth of any other Country,

ARTICLE IX.

All privileges of transit and all bounties and drawbacks which may be allowed within the territories of one of the High Contracting Parties, upon the importation or exportation of any article whatsoever, shall, likewise, be allowed on the articles of like nature, the products of the soil or industry of the other Contracting Party, and on the importations and exportations made in its vessels.

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