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- very talented, and as kind-hearted as he is gifted. It is no unusual thing for him to watch all night by the bedside of some destitute sufferer, after a fatiguing day spent in the exercise of his profession.”

And thus Marion first heard of Dr. Philip Floyd.

Now it so happened that Marion and her uncle had been making some curious and valuable chemical investigations, and as the doctor was exceedingly busy, he told Marion that he wished she would prepare an article on the subject, for the “Chemists' Monthly Chronicle.” She understood it perfectly-having assisted him from the beginning of his experiments, and that she would describe them better than he would.

With less confidence in her own power's, Marion undertook the task, and completed it greatly to her uncle's satisfaction. About a week after it appeared, he was met in the street by Dr. Floyd, who, after talking a few moments, said,

Glad you

“That was a splendid article of yours in the Chronicle, this month; it gave me just the information I was searching for on the subject.”

liked it; but I am sorry to add, I did not write it."

“No? Why, Smith told me he had it from you."

“So he did; but my assistant wrote it.”

“Not old Clark? he hasn't head enough; it is so clear, so direct, and the style is so polished.”

“Not Clark : my laboratory assistant.”

“He must be a talented fellow ; I should like to know him."

“Well, drop in almost any evening, and I'll introduce you; we take tea at seven.” " Thank

you,

I will be sure to come." And thus Dr. Floyd first heard of Marion without knowing it.

Dr. Wood and Marion were playing chess, one evening, when Dr. Floyd called. He glanced round the roorn, but saw only the doctor and his niece; and being introduced to “My niece, Miss Sumner," sat down, feeling a little disappointed at not seeing the person he expected

He was not what is called a lady's man. Though perfectly courteous, he rarely sought ladies' society. He said he had not time; his friends said an early disappointment had changed him, for he used to like company. However this might be, he was certainly very agreeable to night. Marion's tranquil self-possession put him at ease, and the conversation soon became animated.

From chess they spoke of the games of different nations, and how far they are illustrations of national character. From this they passed to music, poetry, literature and art, touching lightly on all, it is true, but with the familiar touch that bespeaks long habitude, and the abundant illustration of cultivated minds.

So perfectly did Dr. Floyd enjoy the evening, that he forgot the real purpose of his visit, until Dr. Wood was parting from him at the door.

“Your assistant is late to-night, doctor—it is actually past twelve; I must hope to make his acquaintance some other evening."

“I thought you had got on pretty well tonight, for a first introduction,” said Dr. Wood, dryly.

Floyd faced round suddenly. “What do you mean!--not that—it can't be possible that quiet girl wrote that paper; you are jesting.”

“Not in the least, my good sir; I never knew before that noisy people were better chemists than quiet ones. Miss Marion Sumner has been my assistant for about a year and a half, and a most excellent one she is.”

“No doubt, no doubt; but it is very strange."

“Only strange (like many other things in this world) because you know nothing about it.”

“Do tell me how it happened ?"

“Not to-night, thank you—it is quite time for busy people to be in bed; but I will some day."

And Dr. Floyd discovered during his walk home, that he had experienced more than one new sensation.

CHAPTER XI.

HOME PLEASURES.-UNFASHIONABLE MARRIAGE.

And the nights shall be filled with music,

And the cares that infest the day
Shall fold their tents like the Arabs,

And silently steal away."-LONGFELLOW.

A SUMMER evening in New York. After all that has been said and written about the beauty of the country, it may seem vain to claim aught for the city, scorned in poet's dream. Yet it has its charm too.

The sunlight fades slowly up the high walls, lingers a moment floating in the air, kisses a passing cloud, which answers with a golden smile—there—it is gone.

The sea-breeze comes from the bay with a cool freshness and a salt perfume that brings thoughts of a rocky shore and dashing spray, and a wide ocean swaying in the tranquil light.

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