Elements of International Law

Portada
Little, Brown, 1855 - 728 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Individuals or corporations the subjects of international
4
Sovereignty defined
5
Sovereignty how acquired
6
Identity of a State
7
Identity of a State how affected by external violence
8
By the joint effect of internal and external violence confirmed by treaty
9
Province or colony asserting its independence how considered by other foreign States
10
International effects of a change in the person of the sovereign or in the internal constitution of the State 12 Sovereign States defined
11
Restitution by the neutral State of property captured within its juris
12
Semisovereign States
13
Tributary and vassal States
14
Single or united States
15
Personal union under the same sovereign
16
Real union under the same sovereign
17
Incorporate union
18
Union between Russia and Poland
19
Federal union
20
Confederated States each retaining its own sovereignty
21
Supreme federal government or compositive State
22
Recommencement of hostilities on the expiration of truce
23
coco
26
Germanic Confederation 24 United States of America
72
Swiss Confederation
79
PART SECOND ABSOLUTE INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS OF STATES
83
CHAPTER I
85
Rights of sovereign States with respect to one another 2 Right of selfpreservation
92
Independence of the State in respect to its internal government
106
CHAPTER II
112
Jurisdiction of the State over its public and private vessels on the high
143
seas
158
Consular jurisdiction
167
Extent of the judicial power over criminal offences
181
Extent of the judicial power as to property within the territory
196
Distinction between the rule of decision and rule of proceeding in cases
205
CHAPTER III
217
Natural equality of States modified by compact and usage
278
Letters of credence
281
Full power
282
Diplomatic etiquette
283
Letter of recall
315
CHAPTER II
317
Form of treaty 317 3 Cartels truces and capitulations
318
Full power and ratification
319
The treatymaking power dependent on the municipal constitution
328
National proprietary rights
329
Freedom of consent how far necessary to the validity of treaties
331
Transitory conventions perpetual in their nature
332
Treaties the operation of which cease in certain cases
342
Treaties revived and confirmed on the renewal of peace
343
Right of intervention or interference 4 Wars of the French Revolution
344
Treaties of alliance
345
Distinction between general alliance and treaties of limited succor and subsidy
346
Hostages for the execution of treaties
354
Interpretation of treaties
355
Trade with the common enemy unlawful on the part of allied subjects
390
Merchants residing in the east
409
CHAPTER III
480
capture
494
Prohibition enforced by municipal statutes
500
Congress of Aix la Chapelle of Troppau and of Laybach 6 Congress of Verona
502
The two maxims of free ships free goods and enemy ships enemy goods
507
Neutrality modified by a limited alliance with one of the belligerent
534
Contraband of
536
Transportation of military persons and despatches in the enemys service
562
Rule of the war of 1756
572
Breach of blockade
581
Right of visitation and search
587
Right of a neutral to carry his goods in an armed enemy vessel
593
CHAPTER IV
607
Additional note on naturalization by the editor
625
Act to remodel the diplomatic and consular systems of the United States
634
Debate on neutral rights House of Commons July 4 1854
643
234
696
Navigation of the St Lawrence
702
413
707
Diplomatic history 355
708
British interference in the affairs of Portugal in 1826
712

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 180 - ... upon complaint made under oath, to issue a warrant for the apprehension of the fugitive or person so charged, that he may be brought before such judges or other magistrates, respectively, to the end that the evidence of criminality may be heard and considered; and if, on such hearing, the evidence be deemed sufficient to sustain the charge, it shall be the duty of the examining judge or magistrate to certify the same to the proper Executive authority, that a warrant may issue for the surrender...
Página 239 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Página 691 - After we shall have offered Spain a price for Cuba far beyond its present value, and this shall have been refused, it will then be time to consider the question, docs Cuba, in the possession of Spain, seriously endanger our internal peace, and the existence of our cherished Union ? " Should this question be answered in the affirmative, then, by every law, human and divine, we shall be justified in wresting it from Spain, if we possess the power...
Página 174 - Agents shall have the right, as such, to sit as judges and arbitrators in such differences as may arise between the Captains and crews of the vessels belonging to the nation whose interests are committed to their charge, without the interference of the local authorities...
Página 100 - It is impossible that the Allied Powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness; nor can any one believe that our southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
Página 242 - The high contracting parties hereby solemnly engage to consider the decision of the Commissioners conjointly, or of the Arbitrator or Umpire, as the case may be, as absolutely final and conclusive in each case decided upon by them or him respectively.
Página 238 - Belleisle and thence Northwardly indefinitely along the Coast, without prejudice however, to any of the exclusive Rights of the Hudson Bay Company...
Página 197 - No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the. perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone.
Página 242 - Islands, for the purpose of drying their nets and curing their fish ; provided that, 'in so doing, they do not interfere with the rights of private property, or with British fishermen in the peaceable use of any part of the said coasts in their occupancy for the same purpose.
Página 459 - The constitution vests the whole judicial power of the United States in one Supreme Court, and such inferior courts as congress shall, from time to time, ordain and establish.

Información bibliográfica