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required to cover the same, while on lighters or other crafts, with tarpaulins or other more permanent and substantial material; and that each failure to do so shall be considered a violation of this ordinance, and be punished as hereinafter provided.

It shall be unlawful for any person to make or to use matches in any way in the holds of the vessels of any description, or on the decks of the same during the time said vessels may be taking in or unloading cargoes of ott naval stores, hay oil, or other inflammable merchandise.

Speed of vesels : No steamer shall, while pasing along the line of the wharves of this City, exceed in speed four miles an hour; and where two or more vessels are moored abreast of any of said wharves the steamer passing will stop her engines and turn “over slowly," using every precaution to avoid unnecessary suction until the vessels in her immediate vicinity are passed by. In passing near the dredge and dredge flats employed at any point on the river between the Western limits of the city and Tybee, steamers must be slowed down and where necessary stopped and worked as above specified, until the dredge or flats are passed.

No steamer while passing the line of Quarantine wharves opposite the eastern end of Long Island, shall exceed a speed of five miles per hour.

The harbor fees, as established by ordinance, shall be as follows: By each transient Brig or Schooner, four ($4) dollars. By each transient Ship or Bark, six ($6) dollars. By each transient Steamship, fifteen ($15) dollars. By each coastwise Steamship running regularly to this port, six ($6) dollars per month. By each Bark, Barkentine, Brig, Schooner or Sea Going Barges engaged in the coastwise trade, four ($4) dollars; each transient tug engaged in towing, eight ($8) dollars, payable not more than twice in every twelve months. By each sailing Vessel or Steamer plying inland, measuring forty feet or more, two cents per foot over all measurement, payable quarterly in advance. AN ORDINANCE TO PROHIBIT THE DISCHARGE OF REFUSE OIL IN THE SAVANNAH

RIVER.

It is unlawful for any person, firm or corporation, or master of any ship, to discharge, throw, or dump refuse oil into the Savannah River, in the Savannah Harbor, or into any of the streams flowing therein, or into any of the docks, or alongside any of the piers, or along the shores or banks of said river refuse oil of any character.

That any person, firm or corporation, or master of any vessel, violating the provisions of this ordinance shall upon conviction before the Police Court of the City of Savannab be fined in sum not more than $100.00, or to be imprisoned not more than 30 days, either or both, or any part of either or both, in the discretion of the Court.

Savannah rates of pilotage.

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NOTE.-All vessels drawing seventeen (17) feet or less, when loaded, shall pay 25 per cent less than the above rates.

Detention of pilots per day, $4.32.

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From Quarantine to Savannah same as from Tybee to Savannah.

Doboy and Sapelo Bar, and Darien and Sapelo River-Pilotage.

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$34.00 $82.00 37.00 89.00 39.00 SS. 06 41.00 99.00 43.00 103.00 46.00 110.00 48.00 115.00 49.00 119.00 50.00125.00 53.00

135.00 55.00 145.00 57.00 60.00

180.00 197.00

Drop, $7; every day's detention, $3.; foreign vessels, 50 per cent additional to the above rates.

PORT OF BRUNSWICK, GA.—PILOTAGE. For the bar of St. Simons and Turtle River and the bar of St. Andrews and Satilla River:

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FLORIDA.

[Extracts from the General Statutes of Florida, 1906.]

1300. RATES OF PILOTAGE.—The board of pilot commissioners of each port may fix the rates of pilotage which shall be paid by any vessel entering their port; but in no case shall they fix the rates greater than the rates now provided by law, as follows: All steamers or vessels entering any port or leaving the same, shall be subject to pay to any licensed pilot performing duty on board, or to the pilot who shall first speak to such steamer or vessel, the following rates of pilotage: For steamers or vessels drawing 6 feet, or less than the same, two dollars per foot; for steamers or vessels drawing from 6 to 10 feet, three dollars per foot; for steamers or vessels drawing from 10 to 14 feet, four dollars per foot; for steamers or vessels drawing 14 to 20 feet, five dollars per foot; for vessels or steamers drawing over 20 feet, six dollars per foot. These rates shall apply to all steamers or vessels, whether owned wholly by citizens of this state or not: Provided, That all steamers or vessels carrying the regular United States mails shall pay half pilotage only: Provided, further, That all steamers or vessels drawing less than 6 feet of water, and having a coastwise license, shall be exempt from paying whole or half pilotage, unless they employ a pilot.

1326. COMPENSATION.—Harbor masters respectively shall receive from the master, owner or consignee of vessels coming into the port for which he is appointed as aforesaid for the services rendered by himself or his deputy, under the provisions of this section, not exceeding the sum of twenty dollars for each vessel, according to the amount and value of the services rendered.

PORT OF JACKSONVILLE, PILOTAGE.

[Extracts from the Rules and Regulations.)

1. The master of any vessel entering the port of Jacksonville, who does not accept the services of a pilot shall be compelled to pay the full legal rates of pilotage.

7. Any pilot detained on board of any vessel by the master or quarantine officer, shall receive for each and every day's services the sum of five dollars per day over and above his pilotage.

12. The rates of pilotage to be charged and collected by the pilots on the St. Johns Bar, on all steamers and vessels entering the port of Jacksonville, shall be as follows:

$2.50 per foot draft, into Mayport.

$3.00 per foot draft, out of Mayport. Vessels desiring to take pilots from Mayport to Jacksonville, $1.50 per foot draft each way.

PORT OF KEY WEST,

[Extracts from the Rules and Regulations.]

SEC. 1. The master of any vessel entering the port of Key West, who does not accept the services of a pilot shall be compelled to pay the full legal rates of pilotage, provided the vessel be spoken outside the following limits :

If she be entering Main Ship Channel she must be spoken outside the Western Head Buoy. If by Hawk Channel, she must be spoken east of Midchannel buoy, intersecting Southeast Channel and Hawk Channel, Key West Light bearing NW. 1 N.

If entering by Southeast Channel, must be spoken outside of No. 4 red buoy, Sand Key bearing SW. by W. & W.

Should a vessel entering the port of Key West without being spoken by a licensed pilot outside the foregoing limits, the first pilot speaking her there. after shall be entitled to full outward pilotage.

SEC. 13. The rates of pilotage as now established by law are as given in section 1300 preceding.

And all vessels drawing 14 feet or less shall pay the sum of ten dollars for dropping from one anchorage to another and those drawing over 14 feet shall pay the sum of twenty dollars.

INTERNATIONAL RULES TO PREVENT COLLISIONS OF VESSELS.

I. ENACTING CLAUSE, SCOPE, AND PENALTY.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following regulations for preventing collisions at sea shall be followed by all public and private vessels of the United States upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels.

Art. 30. Nothing in these rules shall interfere with the operation of a special rule, duly made by local authority, relative to the navigation of any harbor, river, or inland waters.

PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS.

In the following rules every steam vessel which is under sail and not under steam is to be considered a sailing vessel, and every vessel under steam, whether under sail or not, is to be considered a steam vessel.

The words“ steam vessel ” shall include any vessel propelled by machinery.

A vessel is under way," within the meaning of these rules, when she is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.

II. LIGHTS AND SO FORTH.

The word “visible" in these rules when applied to lights shall mean visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere.

ARTICLE 1. The rules concerning lights shall be complied with in all weathers from sunset to sunrise, and during such time no other lights which may be mistaken for the prescribed lights shall be exhibited.

STEAM VESSELS-MASTHEAD LIGHT.

Art. 2. A steam vessel when under way shall carry--(a) On or in front of the foremast, or if a vessel without a foremast, then in the fore part of the vessel, at a height above the hull of not less than twenty feet, and if the breadth of the vessel exceeds twenty feet, then at a height above the hull not less than such breadth, so, however, that the light need not be carried at a greater height above the hull than forty feet, a bright white light, so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least five miles.

STEAM VESSELS-SIDE LIGHTS.

(b) On the starboard side a green light só constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the starboard side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(c) On the port side a red light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the port side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.

(d) The said green and red side lights shall be fitted with inboard screens projecting at least three feet forward from the light, so as to prevent these lights from being seen across the bow.

STEAM VESSELS-RANGE LIGHTS.

(e) A steam vessel when under way may carry an additional white light similar in construction to the light mentioned in subdivision (a). These two lights shall be so placed in line with the keel that one shall be at least fifteen feet higher than the other, and in such a position with reference to each other that the lower light shall be forward of the upper one. The vertical distance between these lights shall be less than the horizontal distance.

STEAM VESSELS WHEN TOWING.

ART. 3. A steam vessel when towing another vessel shall, in addition to her side lights, carry two bright white lights in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and when towing more than one vessel shall carry an additional bright white light six feet above or below such lights, if the length of the tow measuring from the stern of the towing vessel to the stern of the last vessel towed exceeds six hundred feet. Each of these lights shall be of the same construction and character, and shall be carried in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), excepting the additional light, which may be carried at a height of not less than fourteen feet above the hull.

Such steam vessel may carry a small white light abaft the funnel or aftermast for the vessel towed to steer by, but such light shall not be visible forward of the beam.

SPECIAL LIGHTS.

ART. 4. (a) A vessel which from any accident is not under command shall carry at the same height as a white light mentioned in article two (a), where they can best be seen, and if a steam vessel in lieu of that light two red lights, in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, and of such a character as to be visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least two miles; and shall by day carry in a vertical line one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen, two black balls or shapes, each two feet in diameter.

(b) A vessel employed in laying or in picking up a telegraph cable shall carry in the same position as the white light mentioned in article two (a), and if a steam vessel in lieu of that light three lights in a vertical line one over the other not less than six feet apart. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red, and the middle light shall be white, and they shall be of such a character as to be visible all around the horizon at a distance of at least two miles. By day she shall carry in a vertical line, one over the other, not less than six feet apart, where they can best be seen, three shapes not less than two feet in diameter, of which the highest and lowest shall be globular in shape and red in color, and the middle one diamond in shape and white.

(c) The vessels referred to in this article, when not making way through the water, shall not carry the side lights, but when making way shall carry them.

(d) The lights and shapes required to be shown by this article are to be taken by other vessels as signals that the vessel showing them is not under command and can not therefore get out of the way.

These signals are not signals of vessels in distress and requiring assistance. Such signals are contained in article thirty-one.

LIGHTS FOR SAILING VESSELS AND VESSELS IN TOW.

Art. 5. A sailing vessel under way and any vessel being towed shall carry the same lights as are prescribed by article two for a steam vessel under way, with the exception of the white lights mentioned therein, which they shall never carry.

LIGHTS FOR SMALL VESSELS.

ART. 6. Whenever, as in the case of small vessels under way during bad weather, the green and red side lights can not be fixed, these lights shall be kept at hand, lighted and ready for use; and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to prevent collision, in such manner as to make them most visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side, nor, if practicable, more to an two points abaft the beam on their respective sides. To make the use of these portable lights more certain and easy the lanterns containing them shall each be painted outside with the color of the light they respectively contain, and shall be provided with proper screens.

LIGHTS FOR SMALL STEAM AND SAIL VESSELS AND OPEN BOATS.

ART. 7. Steam vessels of less than forty, and vessels under oars or sails of less than twenty tons gross tonnage, repectively, and rowing boat, when under

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