The American Veterinary Journal, Volumen1

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Página 350 - ... in the forehead and eyes, and were often ill and unable to work. Upon examining the rooms in question I found they were both equally well ventilated and lighted. I could not discover anything about the drainage of the premises that could affect the one room more than the other; but I observed that the room occupied by the cheerful workers was wholly whitewashed, and the room occupied by the melancholy workers was colored with yellow ochre. I had the yellow ochre washed off and the walls and ceilings...
Página 79 - My opinion is, that it is presumption in us to say no, because we do not understand them. A horse has memory, knowledge, and love. He knows his master from the servants, though the latter are more constantly with him. I had a horse myself, who knew me from any other person, and manifested by capering and proudly marching with his head erect, when I was on his back, his knowledge that he bore a person superior to the others by whom he was surrounded.
Página 95 - Then spread a little straw on the bottom of a boiler, on which place bottles with straw between them until the boiler contains a sufficient quantity. Fill it up with cold water ; heat the water, and as soon as it begins to boil, draw the fire, and let the whole gradually cool. When quite cold take out the bottles and pack them...
Página 256 - Ye whose hearts are fresh and simple, Who have faith in God and Nature, Who believe, that in all ages Every human heart is human, That in even savage bosoms There are longings, yearnings, strivings For the good they comprehend not, That the feeble hands and helpless, Groping blindly in the darkness, Touch God's right hand in that darkness And are lifted up and strengthened...
Página 41 - The improvement depends on this principle, that the power of the female to supply her offspring with nourishment, is in proportion to her size, and to the power of nourishing herself from the excellence of her constitution. The size of the...
Página 286 - He engages to exercise his best judgment, but is not responsible for a mistake of judgment. Beyond this the defendant is not responsible. The patient himself must be responsible for all else ; if he desires the highest degree of skill and care, he must secure it himself. 4. It is a rule of law that a medical practitioner never insures the result.
Página 416 - ... leaves the egg adhering to the hair: she hardly appears to settle, but merely touches the hair with the egg held out on the projected point of the abdomen. The egg is made to adhere by means of a glutinous liquor secreted with it. She then leaves the horse at a small distance, and prepares a second egg, and, poising herself before the part, deposits it in the same way. The liquor dries, and the egg becomes firmly glued to the hair: this is repeated by various flies, till four or five hundred...
Página 254 - The idle levy a very heavy tax upon the industrious when, by frivolous visitations, they rob them of their time. Such persons beg their daily happiness from door to door, as beggars their daily bread, and like them sometimes meet with a rebuff. A mere gossip...
Página 57 - The hereditary transmission of physical and moral qualities, so well understood and familiarly acted on in the domestic animals, is equally true of man. A superior breed of human beings could only be produced by selections and exclusions similar to those so successfully employed in rearing our more valuable animals.
Página 82 - ... of resemblance to the actual parent then becomes combined with that of the individual variations, and the result is an excess of deviation in the direction of the resultant of these two combined forces ; or, if it be preferred, the individual variations will then radiate, not round the common centre of the type, but round a point situated on the line which separates the type from the variety first obtained. Abandoned to nature, individual variations almost always perish in the superabundant mass...

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