Serving Our Country: Japanese American Women in the Military During World War II

Portada
Rutgers University Press, 2003 - 211 páginas

Following the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and America's declaration of war on Japan, the U.S. War Department allowed up to five hundred second-generation, or "Nisei," Japanese American women to enlist in the Women's Army Corps and, in smaller numbers, in the Army Medical Corps.

Through in-depth interviews with surviving Nisei women who served, Brenda L. Moore provides fascinating firsthand accounts of their experiences. Interested primarily in shedding light on the experiences of Nisei women during the war, the author argues for the relevance of these experiences to larger questions of American race relations and views on gender and their intersections, particularly in the country's highly charged wartime atmosphere. Uncovering a page in American history that has been obscured, Moore adds nuance to our understanding of the situation of Japanese Americans during the war.

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Contenido

Introduction
1
Before the War
31
Contradictions and Paradoxes
60
Womens Army Corps Recruitment of Nisei Women
88
Service in the Womens Army Corps
106
Commissions in the Army Medical Corps
135
The Postwar Years
148
Wacs Who Entered the Army from Hawaii December 1944
167
Notes
169
Glossary
191
Bibliography
195
Index
203
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Referencias a este libro

World War II
G. Kurt Piehler
Vista de fragmentos - 2007

Acerca del autor (2003)

Brenda Lee Moore is an associate professor of sociology at Suny Buffalo, and is the author of To Serve My Country, To Serve My Race: The Story of the Only African American WACS Stationed Overseas during World War II.

Información bibliográfica