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EDWARD Bacon, M.P. (816 8. vi. 407).-If in each case is as follows : The Anglo-Saxon g is information as to the

date of Edward Bacon's hard before y, gyth was pronounced güth, with y death has been forwarded, as asked, direct to MR. like the German ü, and the th vocal as in HOLBOMBE INGLEBY, I may hope for its repetition "smooth." But A.-S. g was pronounced as y in the pages of 'N. & Q.,' as the Member of before i, and then fell away. Thus, A.-S. gif was Parliament in question was of more than Norfolk pronounced yif, and is now if. fame. Bacon not only succeeded Sir Robert Wal Now the eleventh and twelfth centuries the pole as member for King's Lyon in February, i and y were confused, consequently A.-S. g passed 1742, when the statesman was created Earl of into the consonantal y sound, even before the Orford, but he sat for Callington during most of vowel y; so that gỹth actually became yith, and, of the Parliament of 1747 as a colleague of Horace course, it next became ith. Ealdgyth, being feminine, Walpole; and, after being returned for Newport, as I said, bad a genitive in e, aod so

we have Cornwall, in 1754, defeating at the poll Jeffery Ealdgythe-lege, or Aldithe-lege, Aldithe, genitive French and Ricbard Rigby, two of the Duke of in e; lege, dative in e. Datives occurring conBedford's “Bloomsbury gang," he resigned the stantly in place-bames, æl or at being understood, Beat two years later in order to succeed Horatio the parts of the name being Eald, old, gyth, battle, Walpole at Norwich. He is mentioned in Horace ley, lea. Walpole's correspondence as a not unlikely candi So you see there is no connexion whatever date for the Speakersbip, and be filled for a time between the place-Dames Aldredeslege and Althe Chairmanship of Committees. Was he a son ditbelege, and a great wrong has been done to the of Waller Bacon, who sat for Norwich in six memory of my ancestor Liolf de Aldethelege by Parliaments earlier in the eighteenth century ! assuming that he was charged with the murder of

DUNHEVED.
Gamel.

G. A. SNEYD.

Chastleton Rectory. HEAR, HEAR!”(8th S. iv. 447; v. 34).Welsted's'Art of Politicks,' 1731, p. 19, gives COLE'S RESIDENCES OF ACTORS' (8th S. vi. the following advice to a young aspirant to political 467).-In a privately printed catalogue of the honours :

antiquarian and topographical publications of John If when you speak, you 'd hear a Needle fall, Cole, in my collection, is the following entry :And make the frequent hear-hims rend the wall, “Histrionic Topography: or, the Birth-places, ResiIn matters suited to your Taste engage,

dences, and Funeral Monuments of the most distin. Romembring still your Quality and Age.

guished Actors. Engravings. 8vo. London, 1818." These lines refer to the origin of the names In breaking_up my collection the copy was Whig and Tory :

secured by the British Museum. Outsides deceive, 'tis hard the Truth to know,

JOAN TAYLOR. Parties from quaint Denominations flow,

Northampton.
As Scotch and Irish Antiquaries sbow,
Welsted's lines on the vicissitudines rerum are

The book which MR. I. C. Gould inquires for excellent.

W. F. PRIDEAUX.

is probably 'Histrionic Topography,' by J. N. Jaipur, Rajputana.

Brewer, which will be found in the British
Museum,

WM. DOUGLAS. THE GARRICK PAPERS (8th S. vi. 429). — The 1, Brixton Road. reference is probably to ‘The Private Correspondence of David Garrick,' published in 1832. 4to.

LEPER HOSPITALS IN KENT (8th S. vi. 428). – WM. DOUGLAS.

There was a pest bouse at Cranbrook when I was 1, Brixton Road.

at the Grammar Scbool. See 'Annals of Cran

brook Churcb,' by William Tarbutt (published by NOTES ON THE PEDIGREES OF THE AUDLEYS, Mr. Dennett, Cranbrook, 1873), page 64. Mr. STANLEYS, AND SNEYDS (866 S. vi. 463). — The Tarbutt quotes the following extract from the statement of the writer of the notes on the early parish register :-“1735, July 7, .John Polly, of pedigrees of the Audleys, Stanleys, and Sneyds, Burwasb, died of the small pox in the pest house." about Liulf Aldredeslega pot being Liulf de It was still called the post house, Mr. Tarbutt Aldithelege is, I think, further confirmed by adds, in 1873.

S. E. W. considering the derivation of Aldithelege. Aldredeslega is obviously Eald-rædes-leah, that is ANCIENT BRASSES (8th S. vi. 388). -A correEaldræd's lea, Ealdræd being a common Anglo- spondent who bas been kind enough to send me Saxon name. And we must notice the masculine some information on this subject privately, informs genitive in es. But Aldithelege is obviously me that the library, drawings, MSS., &c., of the Ealdgytbelege, that is, Ealdgyth's lea, Ealdgyth late John Meyrick, of Peterborough House, Parbeing a female name (vide “Liber Vita' of Dur- son's Green, were sold by King & Lochée, at their ham), so the genitive is in 6 and not in es. Our

rooms, 38, King Street, Covent Garden, the sale Edith was the Anglo-Saxon Eadgyth. The change lasting twelve days, from April 21, 1806. On the

last day four lots of brasses (2,636-7-8-8*) were with suffering; happy, recognizable, and full of expresdisposed of for 21. 28., but the copy of the cata- sion in others; and in others. again, serene, passionless, logue in the possession of my correspondent does and the task of exploration once begun is not easily not give the name of the purchaser. One lot is abandoned. Very large is the collection, but the masks described as A monumental effigy in brass from are of unequal authority. In some cases Mr. Hutton Fulbam Churcb," and another as “ A monumental can pouch for their authenticity; in others evidence effigy and ancient inscription on the decease of both internal—80 to speak—and external has to be conMargaret Cheyne, 1578." I should much like to sulted.. No reference is traceable in literature to any

mask of Sheridan, and no surviving member of the family trace the present whereabouts of these two brasses. of Coleridge has heard of the existence of a death mask; The firm appears to be extinct. Any information yet both are here, and both are obviously genuine. Mr. or suggestion will be greatly valued.

Hutton's collection is not what is ordinarily known as a CHAS. JAS. FÈRET. pbrenological collection, and in this is one of its greatest 49, Edith Road, West Kensington, W.

merite. For purposes of contrast, a mask of a Florida

negro boy is given at the close. There are, however, no SIR WALTER DE MANNY (8th S. vi. 369). — appalling or agonizing monstrosities. The heads shown

us are, with a few exceptions, tbose of the greatest, Beltz, Order of the Garter,' p. 122, gives the wisest, best of mankind – Dante, Shakspeare, Garrick, arms of Sir Walter Mandy, K.G., “Or, three Kean, Beethoven, Mirabeau, Newton, Thackeray, Keats, chevronels sa.," and states in foot-note :

Rossetti, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Turner, Wordsworth, “ These arms appear not only in many MSS. of Agassiz, Burke, Swift, Scott, Washington, and the like. authority, but also on a seal of Margaret, Duchess of If American statesmen and actors occupy, according to Norfolk, to a charter, temp. Richard II., 'the original English estimate, a somewhat disproportionate share, the of which was, according to Sandford, p. 207, in the pride and admiration, while the latter were his personal

former are, of course, the subjects of Mr. Hutton'a patriotic possession of Sir Edward Walker, Garter.”

friende. It is difficult to convey to others the impression A. W. CORNELIUS HALLEN. made by these revivifications, for such some of them are, Alloa,

of past heroes. What seems a glow of contentment is

seen in the broad, square, bandsome face of Tasso. Mrs. Beltz, in his 'History of the Order of the Siddons's long, interminable nose and large and some Garter' (pp. 110, et seq.), gives a full account of wbat flaccid under lip are very salient. The face of this gallant knight, and blazons bis arms as “Or, Louise of Prussia is exquisite in beauty and repore. three chevronels sable.” These arms appear not Malibran's long face and thick quasi-African lip cononly in many MSS. of authority, but also on the vey little idea of personal seduction. Beethoven looks

coarser, but not less powerful, than in bis portraits. seal of Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, to a charter, Mendelssohn is excellent. Newton's breadth of jaw temp. Richard II., the original of which was, seems almost grotesque. In Thackeray, we scarcely see according to Sandford, penes Sir Edward Walker, the broken noge. Coleridge's head is fascinatingly Garter. Burke gives " Sable, a cross voided arg.,'

strange and suggestive. In Keats the sensuous beauty of

the lips is shown. though we lack the intellectual con. but cites no authority.

trast of the eyes, Johnson's bead seems almost grotesque. C. . GILDERSOM E-DICKINSON.

Tbat of Rossetti conveys an idea altogetber unlike that Eden Bridge.

which memory supplies. Leopardi's seems serene and

strong. In Scott the supremo altitude of the forehead Greta (8th S. vi. 449).—Your correspondent has an effect almost uncanny. Perhaps the most striking has not mentioned the best-known Greta, thanks resemblance of all to familiar portraits is found in the to Sir Walter Scott, which falls into the river mask, of Brougham. We bave dealt with a few only, Tees near Rokeby.

R. B.

and those principally European, of the masks Mr. Hutton has given. The masks of Edwin Booth, one of which

as frontispiece, do not recall bis face as we

remember it. The same may be said of the masks of one Miscellaneous.

or two other Americans who have recently passed away.

Mr. Hutton's letterpress is interesting as matter and NOTES ON BOOKS, &o.

delightful in style. His book is welcome. We only hope Portraits in Plaster from the Collection of Laurence that he will live largely to augment his collection, large as Hullon. (New York, Harper Bros.)

this is, and give us companion volumes no less interesting, MR. HUTTON claims and his pretensions will scarcely

valuable, and artistic. be disputed to por8e88 the largest collection extant of portraits in plaster. His catalogue raisonné of these Celestina ; or, the Tragicke-Comedy of Calislo and Meli. first saw the light in Harper's Magazine, from which, bea. Englished...... by James Mabbe. With Introduc. with large additions both to the illustrations and the tion by James Fitzmaurice-Kelly. (Nutt.) text, it is now reprinted. That the mask furnishes an The latest volume of Mr. Henley's admirable series of unfailing phrenological index to the shape of the head “ Tudor Translations" consists of Mabbe's translation of and the proportion of the features will scarcely be con- the Celestina' of Fernando de Rojas, known as the tested. The bandsome volume now issued has, accord longest drama-dramatic poems apart in the world. It ingly, keen and abiding int rest to students of character, is a curious fact that though editions and translations and constitutes a profoundly valuable, if limited, addition of this strange, powerful, characteristic, and moving to our galleries of portraits. No flattery is there in the work multiply, all have remained scarce.

What, even, mask, wbicb, indeed, does "nothing extenuato nor set is the date of the first Spanish editiou—1499, or later down aught in malice." The absolute features are remains conjectural, like the authorship of the first, and before us, warped in some cases and all but distorted immeasurably the longest, of its twenty-one acts, or,

serves

indeed, the personality of its author. Since its appear. all Staffordshire writers and of all that they bave written. ance it has been praised, condemned, translated into a Every book, pampblet, or printed letter produced by a dozen languages, continued - as though it were not long native of or a resident in the county is here recorded, enough-wbat not. Yet not one scholar in a hundred together with the name of the writer, whenever this knows anything concerning it, or is aware, even, of its could be obtained, and a brief biography of him or her. existence. Our own introduction took place in ‘La Celes. And the list, it need hardly be said, includes not a few tine,' a French translation published at Rouen in 1599, an distinguished names, from Dr. Johnson and Miss Mulock edition, like all the early French renderings, of extreme downwards. All this information has been gathered in scarcity. Later we came on an English translation and arranged and edited by a poor and untaught Stafforde included in The Spanish Libertines,' 1707, 8vo., a trans- shiro man, who when a child was deprived by an accident Jation by Capt. Jobin Stevens of four Spanish works, and of both his hands and of the whole of his left arm. He another, by "soveral bands," added to a translation of has, indeed, had the aid of two most efficient assistants : the . Life of Guzman d'Alfarache,' of Aleman. Of the the one a devoted wife, the other-Mr. Lomax, of Lichearlier translation by Mabbe we had not heard. It now field—a generous printer, who not only advanced money comes before us, and we unbesitatingly pronounce it one for the work, but actually made its author a weekly of the most interesting and valuable of the delightful allowance to enable bim to complete it. He has comseries in which it is included. Fully to explain to those pleted it, and every copy of the book is subscribed for. unfamiliar with the story the nature of Celestina' But the author's little funds are exhausted. He and his would be waste time. It is the story of a Spanish wife, after years of privation and want, have accom. Romeo and Juliet, and is as poignant and fateful as plished a literary purpose of no small importance; and is the story taken by Shakspeare. The surroundings are the county, recognizing this, and sympathizing with his wholly different. The lovers are brought together by misfortune and his energy, is raising for his benefit a Celestina, a creature the infamy of whose calling is only small fund, to which, of course, any one is free and equalled by the subtlety of her spells, using the term with welcome to contribute. Rupert Simms, of Newcastleno superhuman significance. Over all whom she ap. under-Lyme-that is the author's name and bis address. proaches her maligo influence asserts itself, and she and her dupes alike come to an evil end. Quite unparalleled By Order of the Sun to Chile to see his Total Eclipse of in vivacity are the pictures of Spanish life and character,

April 16, 1893. By J. J. Aubertin. (Kegan Paul & and the book when read will not easily be forgotten.

Co.) Among the characteristics assigned the work by its latest The author has already appeared several times before editor is that of "perennial freshness." Seldom, indeed, the public as a traveller, but the journey described in the bas the influence of consuming passion been depicted present work was undertaken with the special object of with equal power. For the facts concerning the book, seeing the total eclipse of the sun which passed over its editions and its translator, the reader must be referred South America in April last year. His account of his to the introduction of Mr. Fitzmaurice-Kelly, which is own impressions of the great phenomenon and of the ripe in erudition and praise worthy in insight. All that observations taken by the scientific party which repaired can be sought or desired is there set down. To those to the same station as himself, near Merceditas, in Chile, who love to wander along untrodden ways Mabbe's trang- is written in a manner which cannot fail to make it of lation will be a delight. Those who know nothing of general interest, and the narrative of the journey will *Celestina' will make a curious acquaintance. Its pic- also be found both pleasant and instructive reading. tures of human weakness and depravity are striking, and Before returning to England the author paid a second in scenes perhaps too animated for the taste of the day, visit (he had been there about three years before) to the Seldom, however, bus human shortcoming been visited Lick Observatory, in California, where he again met Prof. by retribution more swift and condign, and the morality Schaeberle, in whose company he had observed the of the lesson won ultimately the recognition of the Cal eclipse in Chile. A portrait of that astronomer forms the vinistic conscience.

frontispiece, and there are other excellent illustrations,

particularly one of the sun's corona during the eclipse. Patient Griselda, and other Poems. By E. Walford.

(Chatto & Windus.) When over seventy years of age Mr. Walford, well

Notices to Correspondents. known in our columns, seeks to light his brows with the crown of poetry. It is true, however, that some of the

We must call sp attention to the following notices: poems now collected have previously seen the light. They On all communications must be written the name and are now first brought together, and show the author to address of the sender, not necessarily for publication, but possess a "pretty wit" and great power of expression. as a guarantee of good faith, The earlier poems deal with legends pleasantly narrated. We cannot undertake to answer queries privately. When we get further into the volume we find danger signals, in the way of politics and personal grievances,

To secure insertion of communications correspondents which induce us to rest content with introducing the must observe the following rule. Let each note, query, work to our readers.

or reply be written on a separate slip of paper, with the

signature of the writer and such address as he wishes to Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing. Edited by appear. Correspondents wbo repeat queries are requested W. A. Wright. (Oxford, Clarendon Press.)

to head the second communication "Duplicate." To the admirable series of single plays issued by the J. G. W. (“ Bait").-See · New English Dictionary.' Clarendon Press has been added an edition of Much Ad about Nothing,' which for purposes of study or

NOTICE. tuition is simply ideal and unsurpassable.

Editorial Communications should be addressed to “The

Editor of ‘Notes and Queries'”- Advertisements and Bibliotheca Stoffordiensis. By Rupert Simms. (Lich- Business Letters to “The Publisher”—at the Office, tield, Lomax.)

Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, E.C. This handsome quarto volume, of some 550 pages, is a We beg leave to state that we decline to return comremarkable example of the pursuit of knowledge under munications which, for any reason, we do not print; and difficulties. It is a dictionary, a catalogue raisonné, of to this rule we can make no exception.

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