Stage Directions in Hamlet: New Essays and New Directions

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Hardin L. Aasand
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2003 - 234 páginas
The subject of stage directions in 'Hamlet', those brief semiotic codes that are embellished by historical, theatrical, and cultural considerations, produces a rigorous examination in the fifteen essays contained in this collection. This volume encompasses essays that are guardedly inductive in their critical approaches, as well as those that critique modern productions that attempt to achieve Shakespearean effect through a modern aesthetic. The volume also includes essays that enunciate the production of stage business as a cultural interplay between productions and social agencies outside the theater.

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Contenido

Stage Directions in Arden 3 Hamlet
19
Entrances in the Ophelia Sequence of Hamlet
33
Exit by Indirection Finding Directions Out
42
Hamlets Stage Directions to the Players
47
Explicit Stage Directions Especially Graphics in Hamlet
74
The Case against Tidiness
92
Tis heere Tis gone The Ghost in the Text
101
To Soliloquize or Not to Soliloquize Hamlets To be Speech in Q1 and Q2F
115
The Stage Directions Overt and Covert of Hamlet 51
140
Interpolations Extended Scenes and Musical Accompaniment in Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet
161
Properties and Stage Business in Hamlet 34
170
Visual Representations of the Graveyard Scene in Hamlet
189
Hamlet Yorick and the Chopless Stage Direction
214
Afterword
226
Contributors
228
Index
231

Theatricality and Authorship
134

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Página 58 - And let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered: that's villainous; and . shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it.
Página 57 - ... accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Página 28 - To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, As he is very potent with such spirits, Abuses me to damn me. I'll have grounds More relative than this: the play's the thing Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Página 49 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.
Página 49 - That he should weep for her? What would he do Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have? He would drown the stage with tears, And cleave the general ear with horrid speech, Make mad the guilty and appal the free, Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed The very faculties of eyes and ears.
Página 65 - I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? quite chap-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must come ; make her laugh at that. Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing. Hor. What's that, my lord? Ham. Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this fashion i
Página 53 - Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell, Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words, And fall a-cursing, like a very drab, A scullion!
Página 52 - To outface me with leaping in her grave? Be buried quick with her, and so will I. And, if thou prate of mountains, let them throw Millions of acres on us, till our ground, Singeing his pate against the burning zone, Make Ossa like a wart! Nay, and thou'lt mouth, I'll rant as well as thou.
Página 62 - tis too true; How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience! The harlot's cheek, beautied with plastering art, Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it Than is my deed to my most painted word: O heavy burden!
Página 50 - I have taken note of it ; the age is grown so picked that the toe of the peasant comes so near the heel of the courtier, he galls his kibe.— How long hast thou been a grave-maker?

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