Transactions of the Essex Agricultural Society from ...

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Press of Foote & Brown, 1818

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Página 14 - Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep ; so shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want as an armed man.
Página 85 - To carry it into effect advantageously, it becomes the indispensable duty of him, who is employed to overlook and conduct the operations, to take a prospective and comprehensive view of the whole business, which is laid before him, that the several parts thereof may be so ordered and arranged, as that one sort of work may follow another sort in proper succession, and without loss of labor or of time...
Página 86 - ... be equal in all respects. Let both these managers rise equally early, go equally late to rest, be equally active, sober, and industrious, and yet, in the course of the year, one of them, without pushing the hands under him more than the other, shall have performed infinitely more work.
Página 4 - Nothing is more wanting in agriculture than experiments in which all the circumstances are minutely and scientifically detailed. This art will advance with rapidity in proportion as it becomes exact in its methods.
Página 82 - ... but likewise of gaseous matter, is lost; so much so, that the dung is reduced one half, or two thirds in weight ; and the principal elastic matter disengaged is carbonic acid, with some ammonia ; and both these, if retained by the moisture in the soil, as has been stated before, are capable of becoming an useful nourishment of plants.
Página 82 - ... the fibrous texture of the vegetable matter is entirely broken down, and till the manure becomes perfectly cold, and so soft as to be easily cut by the spade. Independent of the general theoretical views unfavourable to this practice founded upon the nature and composition of vegetable substances, there are many arguments and facts which show that it is prejudicial to the interests of the farmer. During the violent fermentation which is necessary...
Página 53 - I know of no fimple improvement in (Economies greater than this is, when compared with the ufual mode of curing butter by means of common fait alone. I have...
Página 31 - Taxes for the of , and made oath that the above statement by him subscribed is true. Before me, Justice of the Peace.
Página 82 - The excess of fermentation tends to the destruction and dissipation of the most useful part of the manure ; and the ultimate results of this process are like those of combustion. It is a common practice amongst farmers to suffer the farm-yard dung to ferment till the fibrous texture of the vegetable matter is entirely broken down ; and till the manure becomes perfectly cold, and so soft as to be easily cut by the spade.
Página 85 - ... in fair weather (unless there be a necessity for it), there will be nothing to do in foul weather ; the people therefore must be idle. The man of prudence and foresight will always keep these things in view, and order his work accordingly, so as to suffer no waste of time, or idleness. These same observations apply with equal force to frozen ground, and to ground too wet to work in, or which, if worked, will be injured thereby.

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