History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Volumen2

Portada
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1881
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Mandeville
35
Corruption of
36
Political economy
37
Meaning of his doctrine
38
Virtue and asceticism
39
Virtue fictitious
40
Mandevilles view of nature
41
Mandeville and Shaftesbury
44
in
46
Replies
49
His vicious circle
50
Selflove and the passions
51
W Laws Reply ville
53
Value of his theory
54
Francis Hutcheson
56
Hutcheson and Shaſtesbury
57
The moral sense
59
His double standard 6o 62 His utilitarianism
61
Reid
62
Association and sympathy
63
His belief in necessity
64
His optimism
65
His psychology
66
The rule of life
67
46
68
Its value
69
Adam Smith 7o 74 His theology
71
Sympathy
72
The moral sense
74
The man within the breast
75
The standard of virtue
76
Its value
77
Tendencies of the preceding writers
78
Relation to the utilitarians
79
Locke 8o 85 Good and happines
81
Innate ideas in morality
82
Reality of virtue
83
The law of God
84
Lockes vacillation
85
Humes moral theory
86
section page 93 Attack on the ontologists
87
Humes crude psychology
88
Value of his criticism
89
Experience the foundation 9o 98 Humes purpose
91
Hume and Butler
92
Ioo Natural and artificial virtues
94
Io2 Hume and modern theories
95
Io9 The utilitarian standard
96
Practical weakness of Hume
97
Ioš The moral calculus
98
Ioč Lowering of the standard
99
IoS Necessary postulate IOO Io9 Laxity of Humes view IOO IIo Reaction from theological view
101
Moral sanctions IO3 II2 Altruistic sentiments
103
Conflict with selfish school Ica II 4 Theological utilitarianism Io 115 Waterlands morality
108
His definition of virtue Ioy II 7 Its convenience IoS I 18 Gay on morality Io9 II9 Abraham Tucker
109
Page
110
Tuckers Light of Nature I 11
111
Tuckers philosophical posi tion II 2
116
His meaning I 16
118
Equality of happiness
120
Tuckers optimism I2O 131 Paleys morality I2 I
122
The criterion
123
Paley a typical moralist I24 136 Paley and Bentham
125
Benthams influence
126
His philosophical weakness
127
CHAPTER IX
128
and superficial
131
INTRODUCTORY
133
party
135
Locke on the state of nature
137
Influence on late thinkers
143
19
146
2O 2I 23
148
25
150
27
152
28
153
29
155
31
156
32
157
33
159
34
160
35
161
36
162
38
163
39
164
42
167
44
168
Impression of England 21
212
section pace 1 Connection of theology and morality I
219
Hatred of metaphysics
225
IoS Burkes writings 23 I
232
126
252
American politics
259
Godwins Political Justice
265
General rules
271
Reason and perfectibility
277
Chief writers of the school 3
281
Smiths Wealth of Nations
283
THE MERCANTILE THEORY
289
Sir Dudley North
296
Io His utilitarianism IO 11 Eternal and immutable laws Io 12 Prices Review I2 13 The intellect and the emo tions
305
Prudential morality
336
Prudential teaching 34 I
343
section PAGE 20 Hugh Blair
346
His inanity
347
The PoETs 22 Significance of poetry
348
Popes poetry
349
The Essay on Man
350
Didactic tendencies
351
His inconsistency
352
Popes Homer
353
Classical canons
354
Poetic invention
355
Machinery
356
Theological analogy
357
Pope and Spenser
358
Popes followers
359
Thomson
360
Ilove of nature
361
Youngs Night Thoughts
362
Young and Pope
363
Akenside
364
Decay of Popes school
365
GENERAL LITERATURE 42 New literary forms
367
Aversion to Deism
369
Aversion to enthusiasm 37
370
Swift and Johnson 37 I
371
Swifts misanthropy
372
His pessimism
373
Johnson and Voltaire
374
Johnson on cant
375
The essayists and moralists
376
Henry Fielding
377
English novels
378
59
381
The REACTION Conceivable modes of change The actual process Its intricacy 381 381 383 VI THE RELIGIOUS REACTION section PAGE 62 M...
383
Bishop Wilson
384
Isaac Watts
385
Philip Doddridge
386
Doddridges Rise and Pro gress c
388
Wesleys teachers
389
Law and the Gibbons
390
7o Law at Kings Cliffe
393
Laws Serious Call
394
Result of his teaching
395
Lawand contemporary divines
396
His asceticism
398
His portraits of character
399
Various instances 4OO 78 His logical thoroughness 4ol 79 Laws Replies to Mandeville and Tindal
402
8o The difficulties of his position
403
Laws Short Method
404
Reason and the heart
405
Magnetism
407
Resulting system
408
John Wesley
409
His superstitions 4II 89 Wesleys view of science
414
Wesleys logical position
415
Wesleys difficulties
416
Enthusiasm
417
Theory of conversion
418
Wesley on original sin
419
Meaning of his statements
421
1oo Its limits
422
IoI Origin of Wesleyanism
423
1oz The Methodists
424
Whitefield
425
iod Fletcher of Madeley
426
IoS Toplady
427
The Evangelicals
428
Protestantism old and
433
Origin of new schools I5 16 Commonsense school I5 17 Questions at issue 16
437
INDEX
440
His Whiggism 18
449
Butler and Shaftesbury 48 Butlers sermons Ö 46
462

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 26 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began : From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
Página 190 - I authorise and give up my right of governing myself to this man, or to this assembly of men, on this condition, that thou give up thy right to him, and authorize all his actions in like manner.
Página 189 - ... from his loins), a man capable of placing in review, after having brought together, from the east, the west, the north, and the south, from the coarseness of the rudest barbarism to the most refined and subtle civilization, all the schemes of government which had ever prevailed amongst mankind...
Página 87 - Tis not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger.
Página 88 - Reason is, and ought only to be, the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.
Página 149 - I take to be a voluntary society of men, joining themselves together of their own accord, in order to the public worshipping of God, in such a manner as they judge acceptable to him, and effectual to the salvation of their souls.
Página 344 - Let her see him in his most retired privacies; let her follow him to the mount, and hear his devotions and supplications to God. Carry her to his table to view his poor fare, and he^r his heavenly discourse.
Página 226 - I may assume, that the awful Author of our Being is the Author of our place in the order of existence; and that having disposed and marshalled us by a divine tactic, not according to our will, but according to His...
Página 97 - Virtue (for mere good-nature is a fool) Is sense and spirit with humanity : 'Tis sometimes angry and its frown confounds ; 'Tis even vindictive, but in vengeance just.
Página 248 - The nature of man is intricate; the objects of society are of the greatest possible complexity ; and therefore no simple disposition or direction of power can be suitable either to man's nature, or to the quality of his affairs.

Información bibliográfica