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Wesleyan ministers was witnessed on the 13th of June, 1883, when it broke up for the last time, and when there was a very large gathering of ladies and gentlemen. Many of them were the parents of the pupils, and many others were old Grove boys, as well as other friends of the school from the neighbourhood. It was a pleasant meeting, but to the old Grove boy the occasion mingled whatever pleasure he might experience in meeting old friends and schoolfellows with a feeling of melancholy, at the thought that the Woodhouse Grove of the past was to be no more. There were present old men with grey hairs, and others possessing the freshness of youth, many of them in the ministry, and others engaged in professional or commercial pursuits. The late venerable John Farrar, who entered the school during the first year of its existence, was one of the party assembled. In the middle of the day a good game of cricket was played between a team of old Grove boys and another of old Kingswood boys, which was won by the Grovians. In the afternoon a numerous group of old Grove boys, with Mr. Farrar in the centre, having the youngest boy in the school at the time at his feet, were photographed by Mr. Sachs, of Bradford, who also, on the same occasion, photographed the front of the premises, a copy of the photograph appearing as a frontispiece to the volume.

After tea the company assembled in the schoolroom, when prizes where distributed and suitable speeches were made. Afterwards most of the company took their departure, but about twenty or thirty old pupils, including both old and young, remained till rather a late hour and had supper

together. It seemed as though they could not tear themselves from the dear old spot. At last, after supper, we all stood round the room, and joining hands, crossed, sang “ Auld Lang Syne,” in a way and with feelings seldom equalled.

A few days afterwards I received by post a very large memorial card, with a very deep black border, embodying no doubt the sentiments of many. The following is a copy of it:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
WOODHOUSE GROVE SCHOOL,

BORN JANUARY 8TH, 1812 ;

DIED JUNE 13TH, 1883,
A MARTYR TO FINANCIAL EXPEDIENCY ;
LEAVING BEHIND A RICH LEGACY OF PRECIOUS
MEMORIES AND SOLID LEARNING TO MORE

THAN TWO THOUSAND CHILDREN.

“HÆREDITAS NOSTRA VERSA EST AD ALIENOS, DOMUS NOSTRA AD EXTRANEOS; PUPILLI FACTI SUMUS ABSQUE MATRE.”

Lam. V. 2.

It is some relief to the saddened feelings which possess one's mind to know that the Grove has not been sold, but is still the property of the Wesleyan Connexion; and though it is no longer a school for ministers' sons entirely, it is still devoted to educational purposes. It has been leased to a Limited Liability Company, and was re-opened as a boy's school in September, 1883. On foundation day, once more, a large gathering was assembled, myself being honoured with an invitation, which was accepted. It was pleasing to find that Mr. Arthur Vinter, M.A., the principal, was a Christian and a gentleman as well as a scholar. The old schoolroom of a former day was fitted up and made into laboratories for the pupils. It is impossible to withdraw one's sympathies from the old place and not to wish it success. The site is unequalled and the surroundings render the place eminently fitted for its intended purpose; and it is pleasing to know that it is becoming filled with scholars, having in December, 1884, 155 pupils of whom 25 were day scholars and 20 were the sons of Wesleyan ministers.

With this account of the close of the old school and the opening of the new one I must end my story. Its narration has been accompanied with much delight. It is perhaps difficult to determine whether the pleasures of hope or those of memory are the keener. Of this we may be certain, the latter are more solidly based, being created by the recollection of real experiences. It cannot be otherwise than a source of joy in the decline of life thus to possess happy memories of the past, as well as bright hopes for the future. Englishmen, with some exceptions, ever look back to their school days with pride and pleasure. The general character of English public school life justifies this fond regret. In these memorials I wish to pay my tribute, as a true Englishman and as a true Grove lad, to the training, the teachers, and the school companions of my old alma mater, WOODHOUSE GROVE.

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SCHOLARS

WHO HAVE PASSED THROUGH THE SCHOOL.

The first part contains the names of 1,770 boys, with some account of he future history of about 800 of them, and short biographical sketches of more than forty. The second part contains the names of 238 junior boys who entered the school after 1877, making a total of 2,008 names. Che figures preceding each name indicate the year of entry into the chool.

ABBREVIATIONS.
C.Sc.-Conference Scholarship,

B.M.-Bedford Medal.
7.Sc.-Jubilee Scholarship.

L.M.-Lane Medal.
M.Sc.-Morley Scholarships.

M.M.--Meek Medal.

1868.-ABBOTT, F. E.
1845.-ABRAHAM, J. A.
1841.-ABRAHAM, WILLIAM.
1873.-ADAMS, John F.
1871.-ADDISON, GEORGE.
1856. -AKRILL, JAMES.
1857.-AKRILL, WILLIAM E, Died in 1860.
1877.-ALLEN, C. H.
1846.—ALLEN, EDWARD.
1848.- ALLEN, EDWIN.
1876.—ALLEN, E. J.
1854.—ALLEN, E. T.
1836.—ALLEN, George. Wesleyan ministry, 1850.
1875. -ALLEN, H. N.
1867.—ALLEN, JAMES S.
1873.-ALLEN, JOHN S.
1875.—ALLEN, W. G.
1861.-ALTON, GEORGE A.
1830.-ANDERSON, CHARLES Died in India, 1844.
1812.-ANDERSON, J. B.

1827.- ANDERSON, John. Wesleyan ministry, 1836; supernunerary at Lytham.

1831.-ANDERSON, JOHN Scott. Died at Sheffield, 1857.

1874.-ANDREWS, A. E. 1872. —ANDREWS, C. W. 1870.-ANDREWS, F. N. 1875.-ANDREWS, F. W. 1832.-ANWYL, ED. Died at Carnarvon, aged seventeen, 1836.-Anwyl, John Owen, chemist. Died 1878. 1827.—APPLETON, W., clergyman of English Church, near Oxford. 1839.-ARCHBOLL. 1833. - ARCHBOLL, John P. 1839.-ARMSON, J. 1875.-ARMSTRONG, S. J. 1841. -Arnott, M., hosier, Rotherham. 1829.-ARNOTT, W. 1831.—Ash, John, M.D., British Columbia. 1833. --ASLIN, JAMES H., East India Co. Service. Died in 1861. 1829. --Aslin, JOHN, wholesale druggist, Sunderland. 1835.-ASLIN, RICHARD, chemist, Chorley. Died in 1875. 1825.--Aslin, Robert, general dealer, Ripon. 1835.–ASLIN, WILLIAM, chemist, Sunderland.

1815.-ATHERTON, WILLIAM. Sir William Atherton was one of the earlier race of boys at Woodhouse Grove School. He was the son of the Rev. William Atherton, who commenced his ministry in 1797, and died in 1850, having been President of the Conference at Bristol in 1846. After leaving the school the son continued his studies under the Rev. Jonathan Crowther, having for a fellowpupil John Robinson Kay, who became in later life the Chairman of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Co. Atherton adopted the law as his profession, and, after going through the usual routine of a legal education, he practised as a special pleader from 1832 to 1839. In 1833 he published a valuable work on some of the technicalities of the profession connected with “General Actions." He was called to the bar in November, 1839, and went the Northern Circuit, and in 1852 became Queen's Counsel and a Bencher. The same year he was returned in the Whig interest as M.P. for the City of Durham, and in 1855 he became Counsel to the Admiralty and Judge-Advocate of the Fleet. In 1860 he succeeded Sir H. S. Keating, who was appointed one of the Judges of the Common Pleas, as Solicitor-General, when he was knighted, and was re-elected M.P. without opposition. From

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