Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

PRINTED BY SMITH AND MAXWELL.

TO

VOLUME I.

OF

THE PORT

PORT FOLIO,

NEW SERIES.

.

.

.

513

Page.

Page.
Abercrombie's Iutroductory Lec- Epistolary, :

517
ture on the Arts of Reading and Fox, Mr. Character of,

257
Public Speaking, 103—203–304 Female Education, Essay on, 382
Lecture 1, on Articulation, 373 Ferguson, Mrs. Elizabeth, life of, 520
II, an Accent,
495 Fashion, Court of,

532
Australasia, Voyage of Discovery to, 113 Gray's Bard, Remarks on,
Ashe's Travels in America, Review Hours of Idleness, Criticism, on, 258
of,

150 Honeywood's Poems, Review of, 408
Antony's Speech, Analysis of, 233 Insanity, a Fragment,

165
American Painters, Anecdotes of, 474 Inquirer, The, No. I.

569
Andre, Major, death of,

503 Jones, R. C. Obituary Notice of, 175
Buttermilk Falls Creek, descrip- Island of Hayti, Memoirs of the, 369
tion of,

10 Linn, John Blair, Life and Charc-
Chymistry,

41 ter of,

21-129-195
Columbiad, the, Criticism on, 59 Laura, a new Novel, Notice of, 68-274
Some Account of, 432 Literary World,

97 - 342
College of Medicine of Maryland,

Republic,

487
Notice of,
149 Leipsic Fair, Account of,

143
Correspondence,
169_455 Lord Lytik ten, Death of,

147
Cascade Creek, Description of, 233 Literary Intelligence,

346
Criticism, Dramatic,
261 Macbeth, Character of,

137
Remarks on,

513 Macchiavelli, Vindication of, 220
Columbian Spinster,

365 Military Character of Different
Chymic Gleaner, No. I.
414 Nations,

238
Documents, relative to the life of M‘Intosh, Duncan, Memoir of, 286

Cominodore Truxtun, . . 277 M.Call, Edwin L. Biographical
Effects of rarefied Atmosphere on

Notice of,

298
the Human Functions,

37 Mineral Waters, Account of, 311

.

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

338

[ocr errors]

Page.

Page.
Monitor, The, No. I.
348 Scribbler, The, No. I.

55
Mortuary,
357-460--550

No. II.

162
Memoirs of Hayti,

478

No. III.
Marriage in Greece,

480

No. IV.

421
Nuprial,
186 Sporting Intelligence,

72
Natural History, on the Study of, 511 Smith, I. Esq. Life of,

135
Olia Podrida,

45 Travels ; in a series of Letters from
Obituary,

187 Genera ac France, 13-121—211
Prospectus,

1 --329-395--464
Pembertons of Philaılelphia, Bio. Truxtun, Thomas, Biographical
graphical Notice of,
173 Memoirs of,

30
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine

Theatrical Intelligence

79
Arts,

461 Trumbull's Voyage round the
Penn, W. Life and Character of, 189 World, Reinarks on,

430
Pocket Book, My, No. I.
251 Variety,

80–170
No. II.
424 Villacerfe, Madame,

244
Pontcysyllty Acqueduct, in North Voltaire's Letters, Supplement to,
Wales, Account of,
419 Review of,

316
Public, to the.

552 Wine, Essay on the Nature and
Reflections on the conduct of cer-

Use of,

247
tain busy intermeddling people, 141 Wordsworth's Poems, Criticism on, 256
Headers and Correspondents, 89--338 Wayne, Maj. Gen. Ant. Biographi-
-455--546

'cal Sketch of,

402
Robertson, Dr. interview with, . 516 Wanderer, The,

527

536
Sympathy, Remarks on,

50 World, the Fashionable,

.

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors][merged small]

Page.

82

Page.
Address to

87 The Natural Bridge, .
Ad un Uomo Deforme, (Imitated,) 273 Ode on Spring,

454
Address to a Mother,

352 La Primavera, (Imitated,) 185
La Bella Scelta, (Imitated,) 273 Philario,

544
Elision to Hygeia,
179 Rettections at Sea,

268
Epigram,
186 To Stella,

181
Evening at Occoquon,
· 267 Song, ·

182
Forresters, The, a poem

538 On singing the pathetic Ballad of
Lines to the Memory of R. C. Jones, 178 Mozart's “Vergiss me nicht,” 272
Llewellyn,

184 Sopra il Ritratto D'Anacreonte,
Lumentation of an unfortunate Mo-

(Imitated,)

273
ther over the tomb of her only The Soldier of the Alps,

350
Son,
271 Sonnet to May,

454
Lines on an Eruption of Mount Etna, 450 The Transit of the Exotic,

88
on visiting the Exchange Cof- Udito ho Citherea, (Imitated,) 270
fee-House in Boston,
452 To Walter Scott, Esq.

84
-- on the departure of a Friend, 544 The Woodlands,

180
on the pleasure arising from Verses written on beholding the
Public Worship,

546 miniature of Miss Mary C-,
The Lover's Dream,

453 a lady whom the writer has
The Modern Laura,

184

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

354
never scen,

.

PROSPECTUS, &c.

66

“We lay, exulting, as the fruits refine,
“ Our annual offering at the public shrine.
“ Disdain it not, ye critics, nor decry
Your country's arts, nor view with adverse eye ;

Indulgent still, the rigid brow unbend,
" And e'en in censure, show that you

befriend.
“ Prize not the skill of foreign realms alone,
« Nor think it Taste to stigmatize your own;
“ But lean with bias to your country's arts,
“ And rather wrong your judgment, than your hearts.
“ Nor deem in soft, beseeching tone the Muse
“ From Kindness courts what Candour might refuse ;
“ No,-from her soul, though rising to her eye
“ What times remote, and realms around supply,
“ She hails, with honest pride, her Country's claim,
“ And calls on Taste to ratify her Fame.”

IN the form of an Advertisement of extensive circulation, the Proprietors, Assistants, and Editor of The Port Folio, have announced that work, as on the point of publication, in a new dress, and upon an improved plan. On the first vernal month, a Phænix Port Folio rises from the ashes of its predecessor. A light and imperfect sheet is changed into a copious pamphlet, an ample repository for the truths of Science, the blossoms of Genius,* and the fruits of Industry. Rigidly excluding party politics and the intractable topics of Theology, all the Gentlemen, who are interested in the work, are resolved that it shall vindicate

• The bloom of life, the flowers of heaven that blow,

To deck the soul's dark gloomy grave below;
That breathe refining fragrance through the air,
And purify this atinosphere of care.

the literary reputation of America. A rational hope is cherished that whether the exterior, or the interior of The Port Folio be curiously scanned, it may bear a comparison with any of the foreign Journals. Philosophy and Poetry, the Inventor and the Critic, the Classical Scholar, and the volatile Lounger, within the Literary Circle we have drawn, may meet in that charming concert where all the instruments are in perfect unison.t

As the objects of this liberal undertaking are equally numerous and valuable, so the beneficial results will be manifold. Ifably conducted, The Port Folio may contribute to the interest of individuals, to the power of Philadelphia, and the aggrandizement of our empire. The place of publication is unquestionably auspicious to all the projects of Genius, Science, and Art. A magnificent

† The subsequent passage from a fascinating writer is not only eloquent but just. The poetry is an honest tribute to our literary friends. The prose, may be profitably perused by the public.

Orare assemblage! rich amount of mind!
Collective light of intellect refined !
Scarce once an age from Nature's niggard hands
Bestowed on man, yet such the Muse demands;
Such, where'er found, let grateful states hold dear,
Reward them, Wisdom; Wealth and Rank, revere.

Great talents, when directed to improve and adorn society, can never be too highly esteemed, nor too conspicuously distinguished. Men of Genius are seldom mercenary: as the qualities which characterize them, are above all price, so money alone, however necessary to their wants, can never be considered the adequate reward of their exertions.

They require and deserve a nobler recompense: the homage of Widsom and Virtue ; the respect of their own times, and the regard of posterity.

There is no other description of persons from which a state can derive so much reputation, at so little expense. They are the pillars of its present dignity, and the foundations of its future fame. The acts of heroes live only in the enterprises of mind, and Cæsar's pen has done more to immortalize him than his sword.

Men of Genius are luminous points on the great disk of society, which shine even after the sun of power and prosperity has withdrawn its beams, and rescue the nations they adorn from total darkness in the long eclipse of time.

Commerce may make a people rich, and Power may render them formi. dable: in the one case, they excite envy without admiration; in the other, fear without respect. But exploits of intellect only, can secure that genuine estimation, that grateful homage of the heart, which it is almost as honourable to pay as to receive. The powers of Genius consecrate the claims of Great. ness, and invest Wealth with Dignity.

« AnteriorContinuar »