The Hindee-Roman Orthoepigraphical Ultimatum;: Or a Systematic, Discriminative View of Oriental and Occidental Visible Sounds, on Fixed and Practical Principles for Speedily Acquiring the Most Accurate Pronunciation of Many Oriental Languages; Exemplified in One Hundred Popular Anecdotes, Tales, Jests, Maxims, and Proverbs of the Hindoostanee Story Teller

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Black, Kingsbury, Parbury, and Allen, booksellers to the Hon. East-India Company, Leadenhall Street., 1820 - 186 páginas
 

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Página lxxi - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel by divine command With rising tempests shakes a guilty land, Such as of late o'er pale Britannia past, Calm and serene he drives the furious blast ; And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind, and directs the storm.
Página xxxvi - Tis hard to say if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill ; But of the two less dangerous is th' offence To tire our patience than mislead our sense : Some few in that, but numbers err in this; Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss ; A fool might once himself alone expose ; Now one in verse makes many more in prose.
Página lxxxix - We are ready to acknowledge the benefits that would result from the adoption of an universal alphabet, in facilitating intercourse, promoting civilization and diffusing...
Página lxxxvii - This vocabulary would be completed, by a collection of all the ancient and modern alphabets of the district, their force being represented in english characters, according to Gilchrist's system, and it will be more convenient to adopt his orthography, which is fixed and generally known, than to contrive another, which, even if it were better, would require some time to teach, and probably encounter some opposition; Mr. Gilchrist's system being that which is now best known, and most generally adopted.
Página lxxxviii - There are only two systems of orthography that can be deemed consistent or complete ; the one invented' by Sir Wm. Jones,, the other by JB Gilchrist, LL.D. My reasons for adopting the system of the latter, in preference to the former,, are these : 1st. Because it is my humble opinion that his system is better calculated to express oriental words in roman characters than that of Sir Wm.
Página lxxxvii - and it will be more convenient ' to adopt his orthography, which ' is fixed and generally known, ' than to contrive another, which, ' even if it were better, would • require some time to teach, and ' probably encounter some oppo' sition ; Gilchrist's system being ' that which is now best known and
Página lxxxviii - Jones, who appears only to have had in view the representation of Oriental words by European characters, 3d. Because Dr. Gilchrist uses different letters to express different sounds, instead of employing the same letters with marks upon them; consequently, his system requires no accents whatever to distinguish long from short vowels as in Sir W. Jones
Página lxxxviii - Jones's plan. 4th. Because Dr. Gilchrist's system is more generally known in India than the other, owing to his numerous and valuable hindoostanee publications in the roman, arabic, persian, hindee, turkish and nagree characters. — This system being better adapted to express arabic, persian, hindee, and turkish words, has consequently been used by the late Dr. Hunter,, in his valuable hindoostanee and english dictionary ; it has likewise been used by AD Campbell, Esq. in his excellent grammar of...
Página li - ... (tshurtsh), j in judge (dzhudzh), to which, if due attention be paid now, the reader will never hereafter frenchify the j of just (dzhust) to zhust, as he will probably do at first, until frequently apprised that our j in jam (dzham) is composed of the dental d and sibilant zh, stated above. kh is the rough guttural k pronounced in the very act of hawking up phlegm from the throat, which becomes tremulous and ruffled, while the root of the tongue is with it forming the sound required.

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