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An Introduction to Vegetable Physiology, with
References to the Works of De Candolle, Lindley, etc.

No. X.
On the Principles of Criminal Law.

No. XI.
Christian Sects in the Nineteenth Century.

(Second Edition.)

No. XII.
General Principles of Grammar.

No. XIII.
Sketches of Geology.

No. XIV. On the State of Man before the Promulgation of Christianity.

No. XV.
Thoughts and Opinions of a Statesman.

(Second Edition.)

No. XVI.
On the Responsibilities of Employers.

No. XVII.
Christian Doctrine and Practice in the Twelfth
Century.

No. XVIII.
The Philosophy of Ragged Schools.

No. XIX.

Will be published in June On the State of Man after the Promulgation of

Christianity : (being Part I. of the concluding Treatise ; it will include the History of Christianity as far as the death of Constantinus Magnus.)

EDITED BY SOME WELL-WISHERS

TO KNOWLEDGE.
PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM PICKERING,

177, PICCADILLY.

I. PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES AND PHILOSO

PHICAL EXPERIENCE, SECOND EDITION. To give forth sound views of science and great philosophical principles, in brief and clear language, is the aim of the Well-Wishers to Knowledge,' and most successfully have ihey laboured ....We are satisfied that our readers will heartily thank us for having introduced to their knowledge the.Small Books on Great Subjects,' and derive as much delight from their perusal as we have done."-Critic, June, 1844.

II. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN PHYSIOLOGY

AND INTELLECTUAL PHILOSOPHY. SECOND

EDITION, ENLARGED. “The writer has drawn bis materials from the writings of physiologists of the highest repute, so that this lecture may be perused with profit by the professional as well as the general reader... Our readers will best understand our idea of a good lecture upon an abstract subject, by perusing the one from which we have quoted.”-British and Foreign Medical Review, April, 1843.

“We hail the appearance of these works as the commencement of an enterprise to which all who love their fellow-creatures must wish well-that of inducing men to think, and of affording them the means of doing so to good purposes.”-Philosophical Magazine, December, 1843.

We welcome the present volumes, assured that every person who reads them will rise from their perusal with the tone of his miad strengthened and improved.”-Literary Gazette, November, 1843.

III. ON MAN'S POWER OVER HIMSELF TO PRE

VENT OR CONTROL INSANITY. SECOND EDI

TION, ENLARGED. “ This little essay possesses the same claims as the former to the attention of the general reader, in the truthfulness, simplicity, and, at the same time, the comprehensiveness of its views."-British and Foreign Medical Review, June, 1844.

IV. AN INTRODUCTION TO PRACTICAL ORGANIC

CHEMISTRY. “We approve its execution, and highly recommend its perusal and study. Much interesting and useful information for the farmer, gardener, and valetudinarian, is to be derived from it, and profit to every reader from the thoughts and conclusions which pervade it." -Literary Gazette, March, 1844,

Small Books on Great Subjects.

V. A BRIEF VIEW OF GREEK PHILOSOPHY UP TO

The Age of Pericles. Second EDITION, VI. A BRIEF VIEW OF GREEK PHILOSOPHY,

FROM THE AGE OF SOCRATES TO THE COMING OF

CHRIST. SECOND EDITION. This pleasing sketch is part of a series of 'Small Books on Great Subjects, which offer sound views on science and philosophy to those who cannot seek them in more voluminous writings. Brief as it is, it is put together very nearly and discerningly. The opinions are perfectly sound, and extremely well expressed.”—Examiner, September, 1844.

“We cannot doubt that these small manuals will prove sources of pure delight and solid advantage to all attentive readers. In fact, the reader will find that within the short coinpass of about 200 small pages is comprised the pith of all that can be ascertained respecting the leading schools and teachers of Greek philosophy down to the Christian era.-Athenæum, November, 1844."

VII. CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE AND PRACTICE IN

THE SECOND CENTURY.

To those who love thoughtful, eloquent, and coloured writing, we cordially recommend Christian Doctrine in the Second Century.' So judicious bas been the selection of subjects, and such the zeal, ability, and earnestness of purpose everywhere displayed by the writers, that it has secured itself in the reflective portion of the reading public a reputation as solid and brilliant now as it will be spreading and enduring hereafter.”-Critic, January 7, 1845.

VIII. AN EXPOSITION OF VULGAR AND COM

MON ERRORS. “A world of wisdom bas, indeed, been condensed in this little work. This is a worthy addition to the series of Small Books on Great Subjects.""

Critic, May, 1845. A sensible performance....As a set of rational and pleasing papers it will be perused with satisfaction."--Literary Gazette, October, 1847.

“There can be no doubt of one thing, that there is both wisdom and eloquence in several of these essays, and no thinking mind can peruse them without interest. This book is worth more than one perusal.”

Athenæum, September, 1845.

IX. AN INTRODUCTION TO VEGETABLE PHYSI

OLOGY. "To such as are unacquainted with the sound and sterling character of these books, and especially to all who, ignorant of the physiology of plants, desire to have their eyes opened to the beauties that surround them, or wish for fresh evidences of the power and beneficence of the Creator, we strongly recommend this unpretending though comprehensive and popular work. In the reflections with which the author concludes his book, there is so much beauty, so high and holy a train of thought, that we cannot forbear gracing our pages with a part of them.”-Critic, September, 1845.

X. ON THE PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL LAW.

“ This is a meritorious attempt towards the solution of a problem, the difficulty of which is constantly becoming morc acknowledged.... The whole book deserves to be read; and its length is not such as to deter any one from doing so, ....It (the author's plan of treatment of juvenile offenders) offers many advantages over the present systems (Parkhurst's included), and seems to tend more to the attainment of the true object of punishment.”

The Jurist, December, 1846.

XI. CHRISTIAN SECTS IN THE NINETEENTH

CENTURY. SECOND EDITION. This book is an interesting as well as a very useful book to general readers and persons who, from want of opportunities, have only vague and confined ideas of sectarian doctrine....His account of the Unitarians is one which may be read with much advantage, and especially as the generality of persons have formed very inconclusive notions about them.”

Theologian, September, 1846. “This is a good volume, teaching, with Christian feeling, humanity, and benevolence." - Literary Gazette, March, 1847.

XII. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF GRAMMAR.

“ The treatise is in itself a bold and successful endeavour to rescue the science of grammar from the trammels of pedantry, and to view it in its loftier aspect, as associated with, if not a portion of, the philosophy of the human mind.”-Critic, March, 1847.

“ This little treatise contains some good remarks, to be valued both by critic and student."-Atheneum, July, 1947

XIII. SKETCHES OF GEOLOGY.

“Of course within so narrow a compass it is impossible to do more than trace an outline of the science; but it is done so systematically and so clearly, that the reader will find a oad and sure foundatio for

researches in more extended works as well as for his personal observation of Nature....We can heartily recommend it to the student as by far the best Introduction to Geology which has come before us.”-Critic, February, 1848. “We need go no further with this clear and well arranged exposition.”

Literary Gazette, September, 1848.

XIV. ON THE STATE OF MAN BEFORE THE

PROMULGATION OF CHRISTIANITY. “The author has attentively studied his subject, and his book abounds with shrewd and original thoughts.-Spectator, July, 1848.

A little work written with more than usual care and talent.... The Author reviews the previous systems of civilization at considerable length, and with much acumen.

His estimate of the different values of the statuary and progressive systems is marked by sound judgment.”-Athenæum, Aug. 26, 1848.

“A very ably written and striking treatise."-Literary Gaz. Sept. 23, 1848.

Small Books on Great Subjects.

XV. THOUGHTS AND OPINIONS OF A STATES

MAN. SECOND EDITION.

“We had marked many other passages for extract, but the length to which our review has already run forbids their insertion. We trust we have interested our readers sufficiently to induce them to consult the book itself.

Literary Gazette, March 3, 1849.

XVI. ON THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF EMPLOY

ERS.

“ We recommend this thonghtful little Book to all who have workmen in their charge."-Athenæum, December 8, 1849.

XVII.

CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE AND PRACTICE IN
THE TWELFTH CENTURY.

“ There is much historical research displayed in this volume, and the results are placed before the readers without parade, and freed from the polemical acerbities which the discussion of such topics is but too prone to excite.”

Atlas, February 2, 1850.

XVIII. THE PHILOSOPHY OF RAGGED SCHOOLS.

Will be published in January 1851.

PERICLES; A TALE OF ATHENS IN THE EIGHTY

THIRD OLYMPIAD.
By the Author of “ A Brief View of Greek Philosophy.”

A beautiful and bewitching narrative. We should not do justice to our feelings concerning this Tale of Athens,' if we did not express our belief that the perosal of it stimulates the noblest and best affections of the heart. It will make the young and thoughtless wiser; and it will freshen up right sentiment and high aspiration in those who already stand on the same level as the writer .... In conclusion, we must observe, that our anthor's English is pure and easy, not like that of some fashionable novelists, and remains eqnally simple and natural through the many brilliant passages with which it abonnds."

Eclectic Revicw, July, 1846. "The object of this fiction is to exhibit the writer's view of the character of Pericles and Aspasia, and the general features of Athenian society in their age. The exposition of public affairs, the description of public events, and the dra. matic introduction of historical persons are often done with power and interest; there is also thought and matter in his work, and the composition is vigorous and eloquent.”-Spectator, April, 1846.

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