The Scottish Nation: Or, The Surnames, Families, Literature, Honours, and Biographical History of the People of Scotland, Volumen2

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A. Fullarton & Company, 1877

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Página 303 - For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake ; 30 Having the same conflict "which ye saw in me, and now hear to be in me.
Página 177 - Who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean ? Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer?
Página 177 - God and nature if he was the faithful viceroy of an empire wrested in blood from the people to whom God and nature had given it; he may and must have preserved that unjust dominion over timorous and abject nations by a terrifying, overbearing, insulting superiority, if he was the faithful administrator of your Government, which, having no root in consent or affection — no foundation in similarity of interests — nor support from any one principle which cements men together in society, could only...
Página 303 - For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of : for necessity is laid upon me; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel...
Página 176 - Hastings himself to have reminded the public that he was a native of this free land, entitled to the common protection of her justice, and that he had a defence, in his turn, to offer to them, the outlines of which he implored them in the...
Página 178 - ... oriental empire. Until this be done, neither religion nor philosophy can be pressed very far into the aid of reformation and punishment. If England, from a lust of ambition and dominion, will insist on maintaining despotic rule over distant and hostile nations, beyond all comparison more numerous and extended than herself, and...
Página 176 - Gentlemen, the question you have therefore to try upon all this matter is extremely simple. It is neither more nor less than this : At a time when the charges against Mr Hastings were, by the implied consent of the Commons, in every hand and on every table ; when by their managers the lightning of eloquence was incessantly consuming him, and...
Página 178 - ... be shocked at the execution of her own orders ; adverting to the exact measure of wickedness and injustice necessary to their execution, and complaining only of the excess as the immorality, considering her authority as a dispensation for breaking the commands of God, and the breach of them as only punishable when contrary to the ordinances of man. Such a proceeding, Gentlemen, begets serious reflections.
Página 17 - London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys, and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas, as he went to court, or returned from it. As he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door, to go in to the king ; and would let them know exactly at what hour he intended to come out again, and return to his lodgings.
Página 177 - ... said the warrior, throwing down his tomahawk upon the ground, and raising the war-sound of his nation. These are the feelings of subjugated man all round the globe ; and depend upon it, nothing but fear will control where it is vain to look for affection.

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