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who embrace it ought to understand, low the head and smoothed the brow and which those who understand it of sullen bate in the presence of this do and must adopt, presented only a man of plain appearance and address. motive to thought and reflection, and As yet, however, he remained in consoon vanished like the morning dew. nexion with the old congregations, Bright sunshine followed, and few stemming the torrent of their animosity could be found that more clearly dis- against the “sect every where spoken cerned the sublime and consoling against," yet in a state of comparative doctrine of Hobbes and Hartley. The infancy. His efforts were efficacious terrors which have confounded others, in briúging many to favour the truth, and frightened them from embracing and many to embrace it with decision the clear “truth as it is in Jesus," that and constancy. Since the time in there is “ one God and one Mediator wbich Jenkin Jones and David Lloyd between God and men, the man Christ bad opposed themselves to the vioJesus," could have little effect on one leuce of clamour, when they began a who had been taught from his youth reformation of the general creed, conto “ obey God rather than man," and troversy had, in a manner, ceased. to follow truth whithersoever it should The enemy had quitted the field, and lead him. He had the happiness to a lifeless indifference had succeeded. embrace the pure gospel while yet With indifference came ignorance, young. Yet such was his candour, and, for the most part, the people his openness to conviction, his teach- knew not on what ground they had ableness and childlike simplicity of been built, contenting themselves with heart, that, had the evidence of the the name which their predecessors bad truth been presented to him in matu- revdered illustrious by their intellirity or in old age, he, unlike many gence and zeal. Now, a fresh activity men who are obstinate in proportion was produced, and it would surprise as they are ignorant, and dogmatical those who think they excel many, how in proportion as they are advanced in much talent was called forth, and how years, would probably have received much penetration was displayed, in it with the same docility and readiness this remote district, in finding and as he manifested at an earlier period. managing arguments in support of the

An opportunity presented itself to doctrines that so many concurred to D. Jenkin Rees of shewiog bis zeal reprobate. In few instances has the for truth in the latter years of the spirit of Jesus shewn itself more capaeighteenth century, when Thomas ble of overcoming the world. Slander, Evans, principally by the assistance of wbich knew no bounds and observed Mr. Lindsey, erected the first chapel no decorum, was fairly driven to howl that, in South Wales, was devoted in the haunts that served to protect it expressly to the worship of “ one from shame and confusion. God, the Father." Although that The time at length arrived when attempt to collect a congregation of D. J. Rees was called upon to act still Unitarians, at Brechva, eventually a more conspicuous part, when it beproved abortive, the spirit of inquiry came necessary to separate the wheat was then more decisively roused than froin the chaff

, and congregate, in one at any former period. The subject of body, the disciples that had been this account gave to the infant cause more silently formed in the bosom of an unequivocal support, and the in- the old connexion. For reasons that fuence of his talents and character cannot now be detailed," it seemed contributed largely to remove bigotry, fit to all the brethren" to form them. and conciliate favour to the doctrines selves into a society of professed Uniwhich he strenuously avowed. So tarians. The consequence of which great was the influence of his patron- resolution was, that two chapels were age, that the inclination to scoff at erected, one at Llwyn-y-groes, and the the truth and to calumniate its advo- other at Pant-y-defaid. These are the cates was powerfully checked by the mother churches of this respectable consideration that D. J. Rees was one name in the Principality of Wales, advocate of that truth. Those who They are the first in point of time, remember the time, can testify that and, it is humbly believed, the first the fierce enemies of the doctrine of in point of real consequence and inforone “God and one Mediator," bowed mation. They are pure and unmixed,

being of one mind in the faith of diffidence, which ever rendered him Jesus Christ. God only can foresee incapable of arrogating to himself the how long they may retain their en. least pre-eminence, was decidedly the viable distinction after this pillar of most conspicuous character. Persuatheir Christian edifice has been re- sion seemed always to accompany his moved. The heart bleeds and the eye address, which was expressed in words is suffused with tears, when the pos- the most proper and best chosen. After sible consequences of the departure of hearing him, one might be tempted this great and good man present them- to exclaim, never man spake like selves to the imagination. Assuredly, this man.” if these united churches should be. This gift of speech, which served to come extinct, a “ candle that was not display a mind filled with profound hid under a busliel but gave light" to knowledge, and some circumstances the whole district will be extinguished, in the society which made it desirable, leaving the whole country in compa. induced the people to urge the man rative darkness. Such a loss to a whom all so highly respected to speak country can scarcely be conceived, to them in public, and by slow degrees and it must be felt by all, of whatever he became a pretty constant preacher. Dame, that have any concern for the There is reason to think, however, moral and intellectual cultivation of that he lamented afterwards this acthe human race. The chapel of quiescence in the flattering solicitaLlwyn-y-groes owed its erection prin- tions of his fellow-christians. When cipally to the exertions, and greatly the evils to the general respectability to the contributions, of D. J. Rees. and success of the cause of the pure Another person saw the chapel at truth, arising from the public services Pant-y-defaid completed for the use of of uneducated persons, were, at a later the people. That branch of the church period, with an express exception which assembled at the former, fou with respect to himself, briefly stated rished greatly under the auspices of in his presence, he could not help this enlightened man; and, though saying, that he was not entitled to some untoward circumstances have exception; and that, if he were worthy occurred, such as the present event, of it, yet his example had an unfait is believed that a foundation has vourable tendency. He regretted that been laid which no man shall be able "he had taken a step which he did not to remove.

then believe was justified by the neTo the most distinguished talents, cessity of the case. D. J. Rees united a very happy felicity The gift of utterance was most hapof utterance. He spoke the English pily applied by D. J. Rees in exercises language with considerable fluency. of devotion. Many have prayed as But he was truly eloquent in his own well, for prayer is nothing else but tongue. It was remarkable also, that pouring out the heart before God. those among whom he moved, and But who are they who have expressed especially his religious associates, ac- the desire of the heart with such copiquired an extraordinary readiness and ousness, variety, suitableness and imcorrectness of expression. The writer pression as he, when he assembled his of this article was surprised, on be. numerous family at the commencecoming acquainted with them as a ment and end of day to seek the fareligious people, at the copiousness of vour and blessing of the “ Father in language which was at their command, heaven"? It is confidently believed, and the uncommon propriety, and that few who heard bim, however even elegance, of phraseology, which they were and must be edified by liis they employed. He was not before solemnity and pathos, could help enaware of the capacity of the Welsh vying the felicity and choice of sentilanguage to convey ideas on subjects ments and words which he poured of morality, metaphysics and general out at the footstool of the Divine Mascience. This was an excellent school jesty. Premeditation was less necesfor those who designed to become sary to him than to most men. His public speakers, and he was himself thoughts were habitually religious and not a little benefited by the advan- devotional ; he spoke daily and printages which it afforded him. In the cipally on religious subjects; he conmidst of all, D. J. Rees, with a natural stantly read the Scriptures, and had who embrace it ought to understand, low the head and smoothed the brow and which those who understand it of sullen hate in the presence of this do and must adopt, presented only a man of plain appearance and address. motive to thought and reflection, and As yet, however, he remained in consoon vanished like the morning dew. nexion with the old congregations, Bright sunshine followed, and few stemming the torrent of their animosity could be found that more clearly dis- against the “sect every where spoken cerned the sublime and consoling against," yet iu a state of comparative doctrine of Ilobbes and Hartley. The infancy. His efforts were efficacious terrors which have confounded others, in bringing many to favour the truth, and frightened them from embracing and many to embrace it with decision the clear “ truth as it is in Jesus," that and constancy. Since the time in there is “ one God and one Mediator which Jenkin Jones and David Lloyd between God and men, the mau Christbad opposed themselves to the vioJesus," could have little effect on one lence of clamour, when they began a who had been taught from his youth reformation of the general creed, couto “ obey God rather thau man," and troversy had, in a manner, ceased. to follow truth whithersoever it should The enemy had quitted the field, and lead him. He had the happiness to a lifeless indifference had succeeded. embrace the pure gospel while yet With indifference came ignorance, young. Yet such was his caudour, and, for the most part, the people his openness to conviction, his teach- knew not on what ground they had ableness and childlike simplicity of been built, contenting themselves with heart, that, bad the evidence of the the name which their predecessors had truth been presented to him in matu- rendered illustrious by their intelli. rity or in old age, he, unlike many gence and zeal. Now, a fresh activity men who are obstinate in proportion was produced, and it would surprise as they are ignorant, and dogmatical those who think they excel many, how in proportion as they are advanced in much talent was called forth, and how years, would probably have received much penetration was displayed, in it with the same docility and readiness this remote district, in finding and as he manifested at an earlier period. managing arguments in support of the

An opportunity presented itself to doctrines that so many concurred to D. Jenkin Rees of shewing his zeal reprobate. In few instauces has the for truth in the latter years of the spirit of Jesus shewn itself niore capaeighteenth century, when Thomas ble of overcoming the world. Slander, Evans, principally by the assistance of which knew no bounds and observed Mr. Lindsey, erected the first chapel no decorum, was fairly driven to how! that, in South Wales, was devoted in the haunts that served to protect it expressly to the worship of “one from shame and confusion. God, the Father." Although that The time at length arrived when attempt to collect a congregation of D. J. Rees was called upon to act still Unitarians, at Brechva, eventually a more conspicuous part, when it beproved abortive, the spirit of inquiry came necessary to separate the wheat was then more decisively roused than from the chaff, and congregate, in one at any former period. The subject of body, the disciples that "bad been this account gave to the infant cause more silently formed in the bosom of an unequivocal support, and the in. the old connexion. For reasons that Auence of his talents and character cannot now be detailed, “ it seemed contributed largely to remove bigotry, fit to all the brethren" to form themand conciliate favour to the doctrines selves into a society of professed Uniwhich he strenuously avowed. So tarians. The consequence of which great was the iufluence of his patron- resolution was, that two chapels were age, that the inclination to scoff at erected, one at Llwyn-y-groes, and the the truth and to calumniate its advo. other at Pant-y-defaid. These are the cates was powerfully checked by the mother churches of this respectable consideration that D. J. Rees was one name in the Principality of Wales. advocate of that truth. Those who They are the first in point of time, remember the time, can testify that and, it is humbly believed, the first the fierce enemies of the doctrine of in point of real consequence and inforone “God and one Mediator,” bowed mation. They are pure and unmixed,

for the truth, which he promoted understood to be large. Having vo from the most benevolent and enlarged children, he employed his substance views, as necessary to the virtue and in doing good, in which his discrimi. happiness of mankind. “ Go ye, and nation was truly admirable, and in do likewise." His age was from fifty which the extent of his largesses was to sixty. His fortune, with great measured by the extent of his ability. opportunities for its increase, is not London, Dee. 9, 1817. C. LL.

INTELLIGENCE

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Warwick Fellowship Fund.

Removals amongst Unitarian
SIR,
Warwick, Dec. 12, 1817.

Ministers.
I Am desired by the friends of a Fellow- · Mr. JOHN PLATTS has removed from
ship Fund lately established in our society, Boston, Lincolnsbire, where he was for
to request the favour of an insertion of the many years minister over the Unitarian
following rules, with a hope that it will congregation which be raised in that town,
stimulate others to follow the example. to DONCASTER in Yorksbire.
Your obedient servant,

J. ASH. The Unitarian Baptist Congregation, of Warwick Unitarian Fellowship Fund.

Wisbeach, have invited Mr. Neil WALKER, At a meeting of persons friendly to the formerly of Glasgow and Dundee, and establishment of a Fellowship Fund, on

who was a short time in the Unitarian the plan adopted at Birmingham, London, Academy, under the patronage of the UniManchester, Exefer, and other places, belá tarian Fund, to succeed the late Mr. Winin the Vestry Room of the High-Street der, as their pastor.Chapel, October 27th, 1817, The Rev, W. FIELD in the Chair.

Sir,

Clapton, Dec. 29, 1817. 1. That its object be, besides assisting leave to inform the subscribers to Dr.

I am sorry to be obliged to request your to defray the expense of supporting di vine Worship, in this place, to furnish' Priestley's Works, that the Third Volume annual subscriptions to the Unitarian aca

cannot possibly be delivered, as proposed, demies, to afford occasional contributions

on the 31st instant. It will however be to small and indigent congregations,mand ready for delivery, at Mr. Eaton's, No. 187, to promote generally the diffusion of those High-Holborn, on January 15th. great principles of religious truth which,

The disappointment has been occasioned as it

appears to us, were taught by Christ by the size to which I bave been obliged and his apostles.

to extend the volume for the purpose of 2. That the Fund be supplied by sub- connecting the subjects in the most conscriptions of one shilling per quarter, to be venient form, and to the much longer paid in advance.

occupation of time than I expected in as3. That an annual general meeting be certaining the authorities to which the held in the month of October, at which author has referred, and in a careful cortime a President, Treasurer, Collector, and rection of the numerous quotations. Committee, shall be chosen.

I cannot help adding my request, that 4. That the Committee shall consist of the subscribers who have not yet received the President, Treasurer, and six other their volumes, would send for them to Mr. persons, to be chosen at the annual meets Eaton's, and order payment of their sube ing, of whom five shall be competent to scriptions, as I have before taken the liber

ty to suggest. Should any friend to my 5. That the meetings of the Committee design have any letters or information shall be quarterly, and shall be open to

which they may choose to communicate, I every subscriber.

must request their immediate assistance, 6. That in cases that may require it, a

as I purpose, if possible, to deliver the special meeting may be called.

first volume, comprehending the biogra. 7. That the Rev. Mr. Field be request- phy and correspondence of Dr Priestley, ed to accept the office of President.

in the earlier part of the ensuing year. 8. That Mr. Brown be appointed Trea

The fourth volume, containing the Dissurer, and Mr. Ash Collector.

cussion with Dr. Price--The letters to 9. That the following persons be chosen various Opponents Dr. Priestley's Col. members of the Committee : viz. Messrs. lins's Enquiry, and the Letters to a PhiloArmstrong, Clarke, Dowler Gili, Holland, sophical Unbeliever will, I expect, be and Sansome.

ready for delivery at the end of February. WILLIAM FIELD, CHAIRMAN.

1. T. RUTT. VOL. XR.

act.

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their best expressions at command; dauger of life should not bare re. and he was master of the best words straiued? He died; but he was preand phrases in his language on that pared to die. Assuredly no uneasiness and most other topics. He was natu- assailed him but such as might arise rally irascible, but principle and habit from a necessary consciousness of the had enabled him to subdue the quick- irreparable luss that must be sustained ness of his temper, which served only, by his domestic circle, by his veigh. in process of time, to give animation bourhood, and by his Christian coilto his zeal and exertion in the cause nexion, when he could no longer of benevolence and truth. He was, benefit them by his substance, by his on this account, calm and collected, example, by his instructious and ilstanding like a huge column secure fluence. against the tempests

that raged around After thus describing the life and him. With such a man in the midst sphere of action of this “ friend to our of them, it may be, at least faintly, nation," who has done more than · conceived what gladness and triumph" build us a synagogue," and the reigned amougst his brethren, when manner in which he discharged the they had succeeded in forming them. part he had to act on a theatre of most selves into a religious body, wben they extensive usefulness, which it requires saw the first temples expressly devoted sone knowledge of the mamers of to the service of ibe true God erected, his country fully to appreciate, there the first that had any prospect of per- is no need of enlarging on Iris chamaneuce; when, for the first time, racter. It was marked by simplicity, they went up to the house of God and modesty, great comprehensiveness of called upon his name. They forgot intellect, the most correct moral purity the hubbub which, for mauy months, and unwearied benevolence. This had resounded through the country. benevolence was exerted towards all

, They grasped the hands of one ano- but towards none more than towards ther : they sung praise to the Most ministers, and towards young mer High with loud sliduts: they looked preparing for the ministry, many of the devotion and gladness that dwelled whom, on reading this account

, will in their hearts: they partook of the recollect their own most essential oblitokens of remembrance of Christ, as gations to him for tender interest in if they had kuown him in the “ days their welfare and for substantial serof his flesh.” The sous of Jacob went vices. They will join with the writer, not up with more unbounded exulta- who takes this opportunity of acknowtation to the temple of the Lord at ledging services from him more than Jerusalem, where dwelled the glory fraternal, in bedewing his grave with of tlie. Lord. As long as the blood tears of sincere esteem and affection. shall continue to flow in the veins of “A prince and a great man is this day the present writer, and till the heart falleu in Israel." shall cease to throh, the remenıbrance No apology is deemed necessary for of that day will not be effaced. thus dwelling on the excellencies of

No considerable event in the reli- D.J. Rees. He was not an obscure gious life of D. J. Rees seems to have Though unambitious of dis. occurred in the latter part of his life, tinction, he employed a very high except at the very close of his career. order of talents to the best purposes, Ever prompt to succour distress, for till by doing good " he found it fame." which he had a truly compassionate To the Unitariaus in London he was feeling, no sooner did a inalignant known by reputation, though I have fever appear among his poor neigh. observed that he has, at times, been bours, than he flew to their assistance. brought into notice with evident reNot content with supplying them luctance. Let the Unitarians shew from his moderate means, he visited such another man, and he will have them, he spoke to them the words of equal justice done to his memors; consolation, and, alas for them and for Who would not live

as he did, and the world, the haunts of misery con- who would not die his death? The tained contagion which communicated character of his Unitarianism especially to the good Samaritan himself a mortal deserves imitation. He adopted bis disease! Why did distance preclude principles because he considered them the offices of friendship which the as a part of the truth. His zeal was

man.

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