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imagination revelled equally in regions of mirth, beauty and terror, now evoking spectres, now sporting with fairies, and now “ascending the highest heaven of invention.” Milton was cast on times too solemn and eventful, was called to take part in transactions too perilous, and had too perpetual need of the presence of high thoughts and motives, to indulge himself in light and gay creations, even had his genius been more flexible and sportive. But Milton's poetry, though habitually serious, is always healthful, and bright, and vigorous. It has no gloom. He took no pleasure in drawing dark pictures of life; for he knew by experience, that there is a power in the soul to transmute calamity into an occasion and nutriment of moral power and triumphant virtue. We find nowhere in his writings that whining sensibility and exaggeration of morbid feeling, which makes so much of modern poetry effeminating. If he is not gay he is not spirit-broken. His L’Allegro proves that he understood thoroughly the bright and joyous aspects of nature; and in his Pensoroso, where he was tempted to accumulate images of gloom, we learn that the saddest views which he took of creation, are such as inspire only pensive musing or lofty contemplation.

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CONTENTS,

PAGE 1-A.G.E.

Took I. ...................... 1 Book VII. ... 140

- II........................... ..... 22 || VIII. ... ..... . . 156

III. .................... 49 || – IX. ... ... - - - - - - - 173

IV. ............ ... 68 || X........... - 203

- V. ................... 94 | – XI. ... ... . . . 231

- VI. .............................. 117 | – XII. ... 254

PARADISE REGAINED.

Book I. ................ 271 Book III. ........... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 29s

– II........................... 285 IV: .......... --- ... 311

Samson Agonistes ..................................... ... . 329

Lycidas .......................................... 375

L'Allegro.............................. .... 380

Il PEN.senoso.............................. . . ... 384

ARCADEs ................................... . 38.9

Consus ........................................................................... 395

SONNETS.

PAGE Page

To the Nightingale.................. 423 On the religious memory of Mrs.

On his being arrived at the Age Catherine Thomson............... 427

of Twenty-three .................. ib. To the Lord General Fairfax ... ib.

When the Assault was intended To the Lord General Cromwell 428

to the City......................... 424 || To Sir Harry Vane, the Younger ib.

To a Virtuous Young Lady...... ib. On the late Massacre in Piomont 429

To the Lady Margaret Ley ...... 425 || On his Blindness............ --- ib.

on the Detraction which followed To Mr. Lawrence............. 430

on my writing certainTreatises ib. To Cyriack Skinner ... ib.

On the same ........................... 426 || To the same ............ - - - - - - - - --- 431

To Mr. H. Lawes, on the pub- On his deceased Wife............... ib

lishing his Airs................... ... ib.

MISCELLANEOUS.

On the Morning of Christ's Na- Anno AEtatis six. .................. 447

tivity ................................. 432 An Epitaph on William Shaks-

The Passion........................... 439 peare ................................. 450

Upon the Circumcision............ 440 An Epitaph on the University

On the Death of a Fair Infant... 441 Carrier .............................. ib.

At a Solemn Music.................. 443 Another on the same.............. 451

An Epitaph on the Marchioness On the New Forcers of Con-

of Winchester ..................... 444 science.............................. 452

Song on May Morning............ 446 On Time........................ --------- ib.
ox1-

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TRANSLATIONS.

- PAGE PAGE
The Fifth Ode of Horace, Lib.I. 454 From Euripides ... 456

- - From Geoffrey of Monmouth ... ib. From Horace......... ib.
From Dante ........................... 455 From Horace...... . . ... ib.

From Dante...... ib. From Sophocles ... --- ib.

From Ariosto ......... ib. From Seneca.......... --------- ib.

From Horace.... ib.

IPSALMS.

Psalm I.................................. 457 | Psalm LXXXII. .................. 469

II. ..... ib. – LXXXIII. ... --- 470

-- III. ... -458 – LXXXIV. ... 472
- --IV. ... . . . 459 – - LXXXV. ......... 474
– V. ... . . . 460 LXXXVI. .............. 475
- – VI. ...... 461 LXXXVII. ...... . 477
– VII. . . . . 462 || LXXXVIII. ...- 478
– VIII. ... . . 464 || – CXIV. 481
- || – LXXX. ... ... 465 || CXXXVI.................... ib
|| LXXXI. ... 467

. ELEGIARUM LIBER.

- Elegia Prima ........................ 484 | Elegia Quinta ...................... 402

Elegia Secunda .......... 486 | Elegia Sexta ... ...-------- 496

Elegia Tertia........................... 487 Elegia Septima ... 498

Elegia Quarta .... 489

EPIGRAMMATUM LIBER.

In Proditionem Bombardicam. 502 Ad Eandem .......................... 504

In Eandem.............................. ib. Apologus de Rustico et Hero ... ib.

- o - In Eandem..... ... ib. Ad Christinam Suecorum Regi-

- In Eandem.... ... 503 nam, Nomine Cromwell......... ib.

In Inventorem loombaruas ...... ib. In Salmasii Hundredam ...... 505

Ad Leonaram, Romae Canentem ib. In Salmasium ..................... ib.
Ad Eandem .......................... ib. In Mørum ....... ib.

SILVARUM LIBER.

Psalm coiv. ........................... 506, Ad Patrem.............................. 519

In Obitum Procancellari Medici 507 AdSalsillum, Poetam Romanum,

In Quintum Novembris............ 508 AEgrotantem ........................ 522

In Obitum Praesulis Eliensis ... 514 || Mansus ................................. 523

Naturam. Non Pati Semium ...... 516 Epitaphium Damonis............... 526

De Idea Platonica Quemadmo- Ad Joannem Rousium, Oxonien-

dum. Aristoteles Intellexit...... 517 sis Academiae Bibliothecarium 532

ITALIAN Son.NETs .......................................................................... 535

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The First Book proposes, first in brief, the whole subject, Man's disobedience, and the loss thereupon of Paradise, wherein he was placed: then touches the prime cause of his fall, the serpent or rather Satan in the serpent; who, revolting from God, and drawing to his side many legions of angels, was, by the command of God, driven out of heaven, with all his crew, into the great deep. Which action passed over, the poem hastens into the midst of things, presenting Satan, with his angels, now fallen into hell, described, here, not in the centre (for heaven and earth may be supposed as yet not made, certainly not yet accursed,) but in a place of utterdarkness, fitliest called Chaos: here Satan, with his angels, lying on the burning lake, thunder-struck and astonished, after a certain space recovers, as from confusion, calls up him who next in order and dignity lay by him: they confer of their miserable fall: Satan awakens all his legions, who lay till then in the same manner confounded. They rise; their numbers; array of battle; their chief leaders named according to the idols known afterward in Canaan and the countries adjoining. To these Satan directs his speech, comforts them with hope yet of regaining heaven, buttells them lastly of a new world, and a new kind of creature to be created, according to an ancient prophecy, or report, in heaven; for, that angels were long before this visible creation, was the opinion of many ancient fathers. To find out the truth of this prophecy, and what to determine thereon, he refers to a full council. What his

associates thence attempt. Pandemonium, the palace of satan, rises | suddenly built out of the deep: the infernal peers there sit in council. |

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Restore us, and regain the blissful seat,
Sing, heavenly muse, that on the secret top
Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire
That Shepherd who first taught the chosen seed,
In the beginning, how the heavens and earth
Rose out of chaos: or, if Sion hill
Delight thee more, than Siloa's brook that flow'd
Fast by the oracle of God; I thence
Invoke thy aid to my adventurous song,
That with no middle flight intends to soar
Above the Aonian mount, while it pursues
Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.
And chiefly thou, O Spirit, that dost prefer
Before all temples the upright heart and pure,
Instruct me, for thou know'st ; thou from the first
Wast present, and, with mighty wings outspread,
Dove-like satist brooding on the vast abyss,
And madest it pregnant: what in me is dark,
Illumine; what is low, raise and support;
That to the height of this great argument
I may assert eternal Providence,
And justify the ways of God to men.
Say first, for Heaven hides nothing from thy view,
Nor the deep tract of hell; say first what cause
Moved our grand parents, in that happy state,
Favour'd of Heaven so highly, to fall off
From their Creator, and transgress his will
For one restraint, lords of the world besides,
Who first seduced them to that foul revolt
The infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
Stirr'd up with envy and revenge, deceived
The mother of mankind, what time his pride
Had cast him out from heaven, with all his host
Of rebel angels; by whose aid, aspiring
To set himselfin glory above his peers,
He trusted to have equalled the Most High,
If he opposed; and with ambitious aim
Against the throne and monarchy of God,
Raised impious war in heaven, and battle proud,
With vain attempt. Him the Almighty Power
Hurl’d headlong flaming from the ethereal sky,

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