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" For Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them. "
The Prose Works of John Milton: With a Life of the Author - Página 209
por John Milton, Charles Symmons - 1806
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Études littéraires ou cours complet de littérature anglaise

Georges Hardinge Champion - 1849
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books...potency of life in them , to be as active as that soûl whose progeny they are ; nay, they do préserve, as in a vial, Ihe purest efficacy and extraction...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volumen20

1850
...the side of liberty. "Books," said he, "are not absolutely dead ' things, but do contain a progeny of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve, as in a vial, the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them....
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The North British review, Volumen13

1850
...the side of liberty. " Books," said he, " are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a progeny of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve, as in a vial, the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them....
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The Friend, Conducted by S.T. Coleridge, No

Henry Nelson Coleridge - 1850
...thereafter to confine, imprifon, and do marpeft juftice on them as malefaftors. For books are not abfolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as aftive as that foul was whofe progeny they are ; nay, they do preferve as in a vial the pureft efficacy...
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Recollections of a Literary Life: Or, Books, Places and People

Mary Russell Mitford - 1852 - 558 páginas
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves, as well as men ; and therefore to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books...things, but do contain a potency of life in them, to he as active as that soul whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve as in a phial the purest efficacy...
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John Milton: A Biography, Especially Designed to Exhibit the Ecclesiastical ...

Cyrus R. Edmonds - 1851 - 251 páginas
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve...
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Sketches of English Literature from the Fourteenth to the Present Century

Clara Lucas Balfour - 1852 - 404 páginas
...a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men, and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books...potency of life in them, to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve, as in a vial, the purest efficacy and extraction of...
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Foliorum Centuriae: Selections for Translation Into Latin and Greek Prose ...

Hubert Ashton Holden - 1852 - 360 páginas
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors; for books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton, Volumen1

John Milton - 1852
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves, as well as men; and thereafter to confine in prison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors; for books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a progeny of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are. Nay, they do preserve,...
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The Yale Literary Magazine, Volumen17

1852
...quiet inlet. " For," exclaims Milton, "books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a progeny of life in them, to be as active, as that soul was, whose progeny they are." Does it not wring your heart, dear fellow Bibliophilos, to hear of Chaucer in Websterian spelling ?...
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