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" A glooming peace this morning with it brings : The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare ...: With the Corrections and Illustrations ... - Página 384
por William Shakespeare - 1809
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Romeo and Juliet : a Play in One Act

Lindsay Price - 2001 - 39 páginas
...CAPULET: As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie, Poor sacrifices of our enmity! PRINCE: A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun for sorrow will...head. Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. ALL exit. THE END. at such rate...
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Soul Mates: Understanding Relationships Across Time

Richard Webster - 2001 - 221 páginas
...story moves inexorably to its tragic end. As Shakespeare wrote in the final two lines of the play: For never was a story of more woe, Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. In Act Two, Scene Two there is an indication that Shakespeare considered this tragic pair to...
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Famous Last Words: Apt Observations, Pleas, Curses, Benedictions, Sour Notes ...

Alan Bisbort - 2001 - 154 páginas
...last two lines of a forty-five-line soliloquy. The play itself possesses some famous last words, too: "For never was a story of more woe / Than this of Juliet and her Romeo." 'O town of my fathers in Thebes' land. 0 gods of our house 1 am led away at last. Look, leaders...
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Romeo and Juliet

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - 2001 - 32 páginas
...Juliet. Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardon' d and some punished: For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. Act v Sciii The play's characters Juliet Juliet Juliet is a young girl, only 14 years of age....
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - 1989 - 1280 páginas
...As rich shall Romeo by his lady lie; Poor sacrifices of our enmity! PRINCE ESCALUS. A glooming peace face: Steed threatens steed, in high and boastful neighs Piercing the night's dull ear; For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. [Exeunt. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM...
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Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare - 2002 - 270 páginas
...lady's lie, Poor sacrifices of our enmity! PRINCE A glooming peace this morning with it brings, 305 The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence to have more talk of these sad things; 296-8 In the Nunn-Kyle production of 1975, John Woodvine's formerly violent Capulet delivered these...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volumen15

Allardyce Nicoll - 2002 - 216 páginas
...a Prince among men react to catastrophe with a sifting of responsibility and a demand for justice: Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things ; Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished. Zeffirelh's change to dignified dumb-shows of grief could not endow these words with the socially responsible,...
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Essential scripts and screenplays: models for writing

Elizabeth Clark - 2002 - 120 páginas
...HIGH ANGLE on audience and stage. 'THE PRINCE' played by WABASH is having the last word. THE PRINCE "For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo." The end. There is complete silence. The \CTORS are worried. But then the udience goes mad with...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volumen16

Allardyce Nicoll - 2002 - 208 páginas
...the Capulets abroad'; when Verona is drawn down to the dark world of the lovers, 'a glooming peace this morning with it brings, The Sun for sorrow will not show his head'. Romeo and Juliet, then, have their being in a secret kept darkly from the world. Only two people share...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volumen49

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 364 páginas
...responsibility. His are the closing lines which round off the play, returning it to the condition of myth: For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. The formality evident in the appearances of the Prince recurs in many other aspects of the play's...
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